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June 14, 1972 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1972-06-14

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1140 trhigan Baiil;
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author This must be noted in all reprints.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 1972 News Phone: 764-0552
Proclaiming gay pride
WITH CITY Council's passage Monday night of a reso-
lution proclaiming June 19-25 "Gay Pride Week,"
homosexuals have finally been officially recognized as
the oppressed minority they are.
Proposed by the Human Rights Party (HRP), the
resolution cites homosexuals' lack of equal treatment
under the law, as well as the discrimination they have
long faced in areas such as employment. Council should
be commended for passing the resolution which brings
these facts out in the open.
Yet it is not enough to simply give lip-service to fair
treatment of homosexuals. There must be a profound
change in our personal attitudes toward homosexuality,
for it is not "sickness" or "perversion." It is a viable al-
ternative to heterosexual lifestyles, even though present
attitudes in our country often force homosexuals to live
in shame and constraint.
As council member Jerry DeGrieck said, "Gayness is
for all people." He said that a new look at homosexuality
might allow us all to discover the "non-exploitive rela-
tionshios" that can exist between those of the same sex.
With the pitifully sexist, exploitive relationshios that
exist among heterosexuals now, another look might be
very valuable.
THE IMPORTANT POINT is to get the question of
homosexuality out in the open Apnarently, since the
council passed the Gay Pride resolution by a narrow
six to four vote. some of our cotncil memhers lack con-
cern for this minority and lack onen-mindedness.
Councilmnn William Colhbrn comeniained that "one's
sexual behavior in a matter of nivate business." Fine. It
should be. But through histor. if a nrson were a homo-
sexual, that fact freouentv fi ird in cases of nublic
scrutinv-emnlovmont, court trials, celebrity publicity
and even imorisonment.
Council member Bruce Bnner ftnd it "hard to
justifv a whole week" for the ntroose. He didn't consider
the opnression of homosexuals imnortant enoush to allot
more than a single day, so he voted against the resolu-
tion.
THE FOUR who voted to defeat the resolution presented
very weak arguments against it-arguments that
lacked seriousness. With uneasy smiles that betrayed
their feelings, the four obviously would have preferred
to hush up the entire subiect. Let us hope that Gay
Pride Week will change attitudes like theirs among our
community.
-DIANE LEVICK
NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT BARKIN
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR: ARTHUR LERNER
ASSISTANT NIGHT EDITOR: MERYL GORDON
PHOTO TECHNICIAN: DENNY GAINER

no I rsrc

WASHINGTON -- The FBI is
still stalking a ghost from the
past. He is 67-year-old Alger Hiss.
Hiss is the former State De-
partment official who, in 1948,
was named by Whittaker Cham-
bers as a card-carrying comrade.
Hiss denied the charge and, for
that matter, is still denying it.
But a jury didn't believe him and
sent him to jail for lying about it.
Whether he is a Communist or
not, he would be the last man the
Russians would now call on to
spy for them. Nevertheless, the
FBI still files regular reports on
him now that he's out of prison.
One report noted, for example,
that Hiss was living with a wom-
an in Manhattan under another
name. Agents have also run
checks on his bank accounts at
the Manufacturers H a n ov e rv
Trust Company in New York.
On one occasion, Hiss lectured
at the New School for Social Re-
search in New York, and the FBI
scanned the school's publications
suspiciously.
About four years ago, Nina
went abroad for the first time
since the 1940s. When he re-
turned. an FBI agent, using a
"suitable pretext," phoned him.
The inquiring G-tnan learned
that Hiss 'intended to give addi-
tional lectures . . . , enjoyed his
trip . . . and did not appear to
have any definite plans at this
titneto visit Europe in the near
future."
Apparently, the FBI is so
short of new spies that it must
occupy its tine watching themold
has-beens.
SOME SACRIFICE
Donicratic National Chairman
Larry O'Brien has made much of
the fact that he serves without
salary. His apparent sacrifice has
given him leverage within the
bankrupt party that a paid chair-
man might not have. But O'-
Brien's sacrifice may be more il-
lusion than reality.
O'Brien is a friendly, outgoing
man who has always had a taste
for good living. Although he gets
no pay, virtually all his personal
expenses are paid by the party.
He is provided a chauffeur-driven
car, his rent at the plush Shera-
ton Park Apartments is paid and
he eats in the best restaurants in
town-all courtesy of the party.
What's more, his air travel
bills are also charged to the party,
often including tickets for his
wife. Not long ago, O'Brien and
his wife and two aides, one of
them a secretary, flew first-class
from New York to San Juan,
Puerto Rico. After several days in
the sun, they caught a plane to
Chicago. Mrs. O'Brien continued

on to Aspen, Colo., for some time
on the ski slopes. '
Party officials insist that Mrs.
O'Brien's fare to Colorado will
be paid by her husband personal-
ly. And they say she only travels
with her husbandswhen her pres-
ence is needed for official func-
tions.
But Democrats who are being
asked to bail the party out of its
$9 tmillion debt might wonder.
HOW TO SELl, A WAR
President Nixon would like the
Vietnam War to go away until
after the election. If he can't ac-
complish this, he hopes to keep
the controversy below the boiling
point.
The President has had some
success. In Moscow, he got the
Russians to agree secretly to
phase down their material sup-
port to North Vietnam. In turn,
he agreed to decrease our sup-
port for Saigon.

orandum and distributed it to
HEW bigwigs. Included in the
sales package were "positive talk-
ing points prepared by the State
Department . . . and suggested
paragraphs f o r insertion in
speeches as desired."
One of the talking points
states: "We should ensure that
every employee of all our agen-
cies fully understands the facts,
and that your principal and sen-
ior officers . . . should take the
opportunity to stress these essen-
tial facts."
Then there followed a short
course on how to sell the war.
- ELECTION NOTES -
* President Nixon has rejectd
recommendation from the Sec-
set Service that he confine his
campaigning this year to televi-
sion appearances. The Secret
Service, unnerved over the shoot-
ing of George Wallace, has
warned that the President can-
not be fully protected in a crowd.
He had already decided to limit
his catnpaign appearances, not
because of the risk but because
he thought it would be better
politics to attend to his personal
duties. He informed the Secret
Service, however, that he expects
to make a number of appear-
ances and that he fully intends to
mingle with the crowds.
0 President Nixon ordered his
political lieutenants to help de-
feat his own congressman, John
Schmitz, in the California Re-
publican primary. The ultra-con-
servative Schmitz, in comment-
ing on the President's Peking pil-
grimmage, said he wasn't op-
posed to Nixon's visit to China,
but was only opposed to his com-
ing back. The President was fur-
ious and directed aides to help
arrange Schmitz's replacement.
Schmitz was nosed out in the pri-
mary by Andrew Hinshaw, who
had the President's quiet sup-
port.
1972, by United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Letters to The Daily should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to M a r y
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should
not exceed 250 words. The
Editorial Directors reserve the
right to edit all letters sub-
mitted.

Alger Hiss:
Has-been spy
But at home, he is preparing a
propaganda effort to counter the
political criticism. The State De-
partment, for example, recently
called a meeting of what is
known as the Inter-Department-
al Group on Foreign Policy In-
formation.
Attending, however, were a lot
of people who have nothing to do
with foreign policy. Robert Beat-
ty, for example, showed up. Beat-
ty happens to be the Assistant
Secretary for Public Affairs at
the Department of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare.
Beatty accepted a package of
material on how to sell the Presi-
dent's Vietnam policy. He then
attached his own covering mem-

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