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June 13, 1972 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 13, 1972I

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, June 13, 1972

Up, up and away sail the balloon fans

(Continued from Page 3
the craft will rise.
When the pilot wants to de-
scend, he simply shuts off the
burner.
The balloon pilot can not
steer his craft. He is literally at
the mercy of the wind.
If the wind is blowing at a
speed of more than eight miles
per hour, most balloonists pre-
fer to stay home.
Balloon flights generally do
not exceed two hours in dura-
tion and 10,000 feet (two miles)
in height.
The record for a hot air bal-
loon flight is six and a half
hours.
The world high-altitude mark
in hot air ballooning was set
last June in Colorado when
Chauncey Dunn lifted 33,400
feet off the ground.
Hot air ballooning first began
in France in 1783 when the
Montgolfier brothers launched

the first hot air balloon ever to
carry a man aloft in recorded
history 500 feet into the air.
Soon afterwards, however, it
was discovered that lighter-
than-air gases such as hydrogen
and helium could stay aloft
longer, travel higher and fur-
ther and carry more weight.
In light of this discovery, hot
air ballooning all but died out
until it was revived in the late
1950's by Paul Yost and Don
Piccard of the United States.
Capitalizing on the modern
technology and engineering that
contributed to the success of
the powered flight, the hot air
balloon has made a comeback.
There are now over 125 active
balloonists in the U.S. and sev-
eral more in European countries
as well.
The Federal Aeronautics As-
sociation requires that persons
who operate hot air balloons be
properly certified. To obtain a

Johnson, Warren, Dukes

win school
(Continued from Page1)
votes. Vote totals for Litty
Wickliffe, Bishop and Brussolo
were very close. These candi-
dates polled 5,689, 5,673 and
5,654 votes respectively.
Wilsoo won 3,315 votes and
Hlolt took 2,876 votes.
HRP supporters termed the
election a success. "With two-
thirds of the students absent and
one-third of the workers for the
City Council election, we still
won two-thirds of the percentage
for the City Council victory,'
an HRP statement said.
Though the election is called
non-partisan. Holt. Wilson and
Yaco ran on a unified party plat-
form.
Two sets of the remaining
candidates received group en-
dorsements. based on common
general positions.
Bishop, Brussolo and Johnson
received the endorsement of Cit-
izens to Assure a Responsive Ed-
ucational System (CARESs. a
community organization.
Dukes, Wickliffe and Warner
also formed a rough alliance
based on more conservative
views.
M.Terry Martin ran individ-
ually.
A variety of issues were dis-
cussed during the campaign.
0 C f
th ru

board seats
Busing, racism, student rights,
"community involvement in deci-
sion making, the credibility of
the administration and sexism
were the controversial issues that
the candidtes debated .
Yaco's candidacy drew atten-
tion to the place of students on
the board.
Severe floods
hit S.D. city
(Continued from Page 1
flood waters.
Natural gas remained off but
telephone and electric service
were normal .
The Army Corps of Engineers
reported a new problem develop-1
ing in Sturgis, 25 miles north of
Rapid City. Engineers said a
dam built in 1903 was in danger
of bursting. Pumps were in-
stalled to relieve pressure on
the dam holding back 22 million
gallons of water.
Robert Finch. President Nix-
on's adviser on relief and volun-
teer svork, toured the floor areas
for an hour by helicopter yester-
day and later told newsmen, "It
was an act of God that the Na-
tional Guard happened to be in
camp here when this happened."
Finch said he woud report di-
rectly to the President and urge
that tite nation contribtite
through the Red Cross to pro-
vide "the short-term funds need-
ed for Iotekeeping, food a n d
sheller."
Be said the progress made in
cleaning the area has been re-
markable and he said all fed-
eral agencies that can be acti-
vated are working in Rapid City.
"What we need now is to mobil-
ize nongovernmental resources."

balloon pilot's license, one must
take eight training flights, pass
a writtten exam, and obtain a
second class medical certificate.
Accidents in balloons, accord-
ing to Dr. Grabb, are rare but
not unheard of. The greatest
danger is flying into electrical
wires.
Hot air balloon rallies are
scheduled annually at the Ohio
State Fair, Whamobass in
northern California, and at the
St. Paul Winter Carnival.
The largest yearly balloon
events are the National Balloon
Races at Simpson College in
Indianola. Iowa. Ballooning is
also a fairly popular interna-
tional sport. Last fall an Inter-
national Gas Balloon event took
place in Sint-Niklaas, Belgium.
Dr. Grabb was among the par-
ticipants representing the U.S.
there.
Fifty German balloon pilots
participated in the Sept., 1970.
German National Championship
at Augsburg.
The major structural compon-
ents of a hot air balloon are its
hasket, oweere the pilot is seated,
the burner atd fuel tatks carry-
ing liquified propane, and the
envelope, the colorful rounded
part which visibly distinguishes
the baltoon from below.
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
Dascola Barbers
2 SHOPS
0611 E. University
0615 E. Liberty
TONIGHT 7 and 9
3020 Washtenaw Dial 434-1782
Award Winner
1972 Cannes
Festival
'SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
fIVE"

The envelope is made of
specially treated and reinforced
nylon which is very light, yet
very strong. The fabric is used
because it will not support a
flame and resists tearing.
The diameter of most bal-
loon envelopes is 45 to 50 feet.
Heights range from 70 to 90
feet.
A fully inflated hot air bal-
loon is about the size of a three-
story house.
Hot air balloons cost from
$2,000 to $5,000.
Many manufacturers' provide
lessors in addition to balloons.
Among the most noted manu-
facturers are Raven Balloons in
South Dakota and Piccard Bal-
loons in California.

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671
Read Daily
Classifieds

We have the BES T
REPAIRS and SERVICE
around-TRY US
SPORTS CAR SERVICE
OF ANN ARBOR, Inc.
4705 Wosktenow
(snextto Ypsi-Annodieint
434-01 10
T-W-F-8-6; M and Th 8-9
"MODERN TIMES" HAS
NEVER BEEN SHOWN
ON TELEVISION!
STARTS WEDNESDAY
Ckare Chln
vwith Paulette Goddard
Writen, produced and directed b} ChCarles. Chtaprl.
Rele edt i tu th C tlumia liture
"A vcr, very futtymeittie. It is alsoan extremely
loving one. If for some ridiculous reason, you
haven't sects it, tou cannot afford to delay."
--VincenW t tmt, ttw'Y ork Times, Jan. 2i, 1972
CHARLIE CHAPLIN-WINNER SPECIAL ACADEMY AWARD
"MODERN TIMES" STARTS WEDNESDAY
u Ends Tuesday
"THE BUTTERFLY"
"FO . A . "7 "97" 6:30-8:00-9:30- X

BLOW-UP
BLOW-UP
Michaelangelo Antonioni's stunning color cinematic milestone
0 DAVID HEMMINGS . VANESSA REDGRAVE 0 SARAH MILES
Music by HERBIE HANCOCK 0 THE YARDBIRDS (with Jeff Beck)
. BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR " BEST DIRECTOR
* " . . the sharpest cinema of the year."--Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
* "Antonioni revolutionalized the art of the color film with Blow-Up . , Until Blow-Up no film-
maker had successfully used color to deal with real people in real situations on a contemporary basis."
ORIGINAL FORMAT UNCUT 35MM THEATRICAL PRINT FOR BRILLIANCE OF AND SOUND
TONIGHT-June 13th ONLY
auditorium a, angell hall 7 & 9 p.m. $1
Tickets for both shows on sale outside the auditorium at 6 P.M.
For a copy of our complete spring/summer schedule, write us at P.O. Box 8, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48107
Coming Thursday, June 15, 7 & 9 p.m. COMING TUESDAY, JUNE 17,.7 & 9 p.m.
VINCENT PRICE in Roger Corman's VICE AND VERSA
MASQUE OF THE MICK JAGGER & JAMES FOX in
RED DEATH PERFORMANCE
First on campus showing in the Gangster on the lam meets recluse
original 35mm Cinemascope format. rode-star, magic and ritual.

o o i It's
Fried Chicken
Lunch 994o
3035 Wasftlenaw across rrom Lee Oldsmobile

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