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June 09, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

h
Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, June 9, 1972

Ten school candidates vie for three vacant seats

(Continued from Pagel2)
the party has initiated a write-
in campaign.
"I'm running because the
school board controls the lives
of students 180 days a year and
I believe in self-government,"
Yaco says.
Addressing himself to the is-
sues of racism and sexism in the
schools, Bishop says, "We must
be sensitive to what the prob-
lems are. Every child should be
treated as an individual."
Bishop disagrees that students
should have a voting place on
the board. The student advisory
board is "a mechanism for stu-
dents to feed information to the
board. But I could adjust if
things were changed"
Bishop also condemns track-
ing. "Some children get labelled
as not having ability and end
up with an inferior education,"
he says.
Brussolo supports an increase
in community input into deci-
sion-making. But she expresses
some reservations on the con-
cept of a tripartite board.
"If we get schools so decen-
tralized, I wonder what it does
to them. However, we do need
to change the pattern of par-
ticipation."

She supports busing as a viable
tool to achieve racial balance.
"The board must make a com-
mitment to equal allocation of
resources and equal education."
Dukes is opposed to busing
"for the sole purpose of -achiev-
ing an artificial racial balance.
"We should concentrate on
spending funds to improve edu-
cational opportunities for all," he
says. Dukes supports the "neigh-
borhood school" concept which
would allow "the youngest chil-
dren to live within walking dis-
tance from their homes."
Dukes believes the system's
discipline policy must he admin-
istered fairly and firmly to pro-
tect student rights.
Johnson says he is running
for a second term on the board
to push for change to make
"the educational experience
meaningful, innovative and hu-
mane."
Johnson was recently appoint-
ed vice president for student
services.
Johnson advocates recruiting
teachers from minority groups
and promoting minority group
professionals to administrative
positions.
Johnson supports busing if
necessary to give children "ac-

cess to educational resources
and a multi-ethnic experience,"
Martin supports tracking as
an educationally valid practice.
Children "feel most secure in a
structured situation in school.
Kids like to remain kids," she
says.
Martin strongly opposes bus-
ing, saying that it does not
achieve "anything" and that
black children do not need to
be with white children to learn.
Martin says that a student
has no place on the board as a
voting member. Referring to
Yaco, Martin says, "She doesn't
represent anyone at all, includ-
ing 15 year olds."
Warner, the current school
hoard president, opposes hosing,
saying that "there is no evi-
dence that busing for integra-
tion will help poor kids learn
basic skills." He proposes apply-
ing money that would be spent
on busing to go into "beefed up
programs."
Warner believes the current
school discipline policy is too
weak and confusing and should
be more specific. He also says
expulsion should be available to
the board.
Warner does not believe that
a student should have a voting

voice on the board.
Lettie Wickliff, a retired
teacher, expresses concern
about teachers getting needed
help and support. "If teachers
are dissatisfied it will affect
how they teach our children.
The administration should lis-
ten to the teachers who feel ig-
nored and don't have the op-
portunity to voice their differ-
ences or get help they may
need."
Wickliff opposes busing for
racial balance, and says it im-
plies that blacks are intellect-
ually inferior to white chil-
dren.
HUMAN REWARDS
OZONE HOUSE is looking for
friendly people who can provide
a floor or couch to crash sum-
mer travellers overnight. If you
can help call 769-6540. Spe-
cify desired limitations on your
hospitality.

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by Tower Plaza
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at East U.

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