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June 07, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tornadoes: Twisting
into season locall

By DIANE LEVICK
You say "it can't happen
here?" Wrong. Michigan is def-
initely tornado country, as are
most of the midwestern, south-
ern, and central states.
Right now is tornado season.
According to Dr. Dennis Baker
of the University's Meterology
and Oceanography Dept., May
and June offer the most chance
for tornadoes, but tornadoes
can occur anytime from March
to September.
A tornado is a small area of
winds rotating in a counter-
clockwise direction at high
speed, forming the well-known
funnel-shaped cloud.
"Tornadoes are caused by
thunderstorms," Baker says,
"so they're most active in the
afternoon."
Severe thunderstorms usually
develop late in the afternoon
because of the heating of the
earth's surface by the sun. "The
longer the sun has heated the
surface, the more energy the
storm has to develop with,"
Baker explains. "And the more
energy in the storm, the more
likely it is for a tornado."
A tornado travels at 20 to
40 mph
Although the high winds of a
tornado uproot trees and create
House OKs
personal
income tax
LANSING, Mich. (M) - The
Michigan House, by a narrow,
57-46 margin, voted yesterday to
continue the state's 3.9 per cent
personal income tax beyond an
approaching Aug. 1 expiration
date.
Passage of the tax extension,
approved many months ago by
the Senate, appeared to clear
the way for final settlement of
a 1972-73 fiscal year spending
budget now estimated at some
$2.6 billion.
The House yesterday also ap-
proved, 69-33, a state-local rev-
enue sharing bill that will
spread $240 million among var-
ious governmental units next
fiscal year.
The figure is up some $18
million from the amountmbeing
shared this year. The measure
now goes to the Senate.
Final House approval of the
tax bill came only after two
roll calls that saw Democrats
and Republicans repeatedly re-
fuse to support it in an election
year.
Many Democrats predicted the
$300 million to $350 million ex-
pected from the tax would prove
insufficient and would have to
be augmented by a higher tax
rate or other budgetary adjust-
ments.
Passage came several hours
after approval of a $240 million
state-local revenue s h a rci n g
measure.
House Speaker William Ryan
(D-Detroit) expressed optimism,
however, for prompt action on
accumulated budget bills. Ryan
said the $640-million welfare bill
would be one of the first pushed
toward final voting, but he said
he remained uncertain whether
the controversial issue would
pass without an amendment to
limit overall welfare spending.

U-M BARBERS
and HAIRSTYLISTS
RAZOR CUTS
SHAGS
CUSTOM
MICH UNION

serious hazards from objects
blown through the air, houses
are damaged in another way.
"That damage is caused by
the low pressure area inside the
tornado. The house seems to
explode as the air inside it tries
to get out into this low pressure
area," Baker says,/
Because of the potential dan-
ger of a tornado, knowing safe-
ty rules can mean the differ-
ence between life and death.
If a tornado "watch" is is-
sued by the weather bureau,
this means that a tornado is ex-
pected. People are advised to
keep an ear tuned to the radio
for further information.
If, however, the weather bu-
reau reports a tornado "warn-
ing", a tornado has already been
observed. According to a Civil
Defense pamphlet, the state has
had 198 tornado warnings in
the past 16 years.
Baker advises that storm
cellars or the southwest cor-
ners of basements make safe
shelters. "If a warning is issued,
any heavily constructed building
will do," he says. "Most Uni-
versity buildings are probably
okay."
In addition, people should
stay away from windows. If in
an office building, workers can
use an interior hallway on the
lowest floor possible.
For those in open fields with
no chance of taking refuge in a
cellar or strong building, ra-
vines or ditches offer some pro-
tection.
'U'bus visits
Fuller Pooal
(Continued from Page 3)
schools let out," he said. "With
an estimated peak of 1400 peo-
ple the parking lot will be pret-
ty full. Especially at the pick-
up time of 4 or 5 when the
pool closes it would be dan-
gerous."
How about an earlier pick-up
time?
"I would assume the people
want to use the pool all day."
John Feldkamp, University
Housing Director and initiator
of the outing seemed most un-
comfortable of all.
"Our position," he said, "is
still that the buses should stop
at the pool."
"Who can make the deci-
sion?" Beck asked.
Ellsworth said it was up to
Feldkamp. Feldkamp just grin-
ned, and everybody seemed
confused.
What now? "Well, I guess
we'll just have to study it some
more," Feldkamp said.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Blletin is an
official phublcation of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYFJWRITTEN FORM to
400 E. Jefferson, efore 2 p.n. of
the day preceding pulication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
notracceptc foe, publicatio. For
niere infoemation, phone 764-20.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7
Commission for women: Homere
Heth Louge, Untin, 11 am.
HniveUsity Players: Thomas' "Char-
ley's Aunt," Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre e8pm.

Anti-apartheid demonstration
Police, wielding sticks, charge a group of students demonstrating against the racial policies of the
South African government Monday outside the St. Mary's Cathedral in Johannesburg.
I'f l d Z //NTi nOSA d"jC ' l? .

Ul,"Alk AIVII UAG(rEK: I

Spyvs. sp
BONN, Germany (A) - Like
characters in a James Bond mo-
vie, Communist spy controller
X met agent Y at a secret
Frankfurt location to brief him
on his latest assignment.
The undercover spymaster
offered his agent 100,000 marks
-about $30,000 - to meet and
marry a senior West German
government official to obtain
classified information from her.
Other tasks included tracing
Biirsley, talks
about abortion
(Continued from Page 3)
were recently acted upon by the
state legislature.
One such bill, which was pass-
ed Monday night, allows organ-
izations to distribute birth con-
trol information to minors age
16 to 18 without first receiving
permission from the young
people's parents.
Two other bills are currently
being considered by the legis-
lature, one of which would allow
the words "birth control" to be
used in public school sexreduca-
tion classes and the other would
require county clerks to include
a list of all local family planning
agencies when he issues a mar-
riage license.
Bursley said that it is impor-
tant to win "these little vic-
tories concerning family plan-
hing" in order to convince legis-
lators that family planning is
not a politically dangerous issue
to endorse.
TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

in Germany
the whereabouts of a colleague
who defected to the West, get-
ting information on West Ger-
man electronics research and
obtaining West German pass-
ports and blank auto registra-
tion papers.
Agents and spymaster were
caught red-handed at their
15th meeting, the Federal Of-
fice for the Protection of the
Constitution, Bonn's internal
security watchdog, reported
yesterday in its 1971 report on
counterespionag.
The spymaster, a trade mis-
sion representative, was deport-
ed, though his wife refused to
go back to their unidentified
East European-home. The agent
became one of 47 persons pro-
secuted last year on treason
and espionage charges.
The West German report in-
dicated this incident was only
a fragment emerging from West
Germany's underworld of East-
West intrigue and espionage.
West Germany, an East-West
switching point in more ways
than one, has been a prime tar-
get for Communist East Euro-
pean espionage ever since the
cold war days of the '50s and
'60s.
COMING
MARAJ/SADE
Residential College
Summer Players
JUNE 14-17
Co-sponsored by UAC

The
UMAN
RIGHTS
aPARTY
Dinner Diocussion
Thurs., June 8 at 6 p.m.
sn issues and strategy of the
school board cawpaign
304 S. THAYER
761-6650 75c
M(AT-DAT-GRE
LSAT-ATGSB
NAT'L.BDS.
* Preparation for teses required far
adwission to graduate and pro-
fessonal schools
" Sia asd twelve. session groups
" Swall groups
* Voluminous waterial for howe
study prepared by esperts in
each field
" Lesson schedule can be tailored
to west individual needs
Summer Sessions
Special Compact Courses
Weekends-1Intersessions
STANLEY H. KAPLAN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
DETROIT BRANCH
21711 W.TenMiloRd.,Suite 113
Southfield, Michigan 48075
13131 354-0085
Success Through Education
Since 1938
Branches in principal cities in U.S.
The Tutoring School with the
Natinwide-eputation

HEALTH SERVICE
SUMMER HOURS
The Main Medical Clinic and most of the other clinics and
supportive services will continue through the summer on the
same hours as usual (8 to 5, daily). However, there are. a few
changes you should know about:
ALLERGY CLINIC-8 to 11 :30 & 1 to 4, daily
GYNECOLOGY CLINIC-8 to 12 & 1 to 5, daily
PHYSIOTHERAPY-8 to 12, daily
PROBLEM PREGNANCY COUNSELING-3 to 5,
Monday & Thursday
As always, the Immunization Clinic closes at 4. If you have
other questions, or a complaint, call us.
Health
Service 6-0" P
WEEKDAYS Idf
NOONTO
THREE t
763-4384

Simpson Institute Benefit

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-June 7-10-8 p.m.
-air conditioned for your comfort
Tickets at $5-4-3-2. TAX DEDUCTABLE
Box Office 10-1; 2-5; 668-6300

i i

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