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June 02, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, June 2, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

S. iets hit northe
Hue, seek N. Viets&Q

(Continued from Page 3)
country.
In the central highlands Sai-
gon government soldiers con-
tinued to make slow progress in
the provincial capital of Kontem,
Associated Press correspondent
Michael Putzel reported.
North Vietnamese forces held
onto parts of the former 22nd
Division headquarters at Kon-
tum's northern sector as well
as an armored cavalry com-
pound. Spokesmen said they
found 98 communist dead, in-
cluding 49 killed by air strikes
just north of town.
At the provincial capital of
An Loc, 60 miles north of Sai-
gon, communist troops ringing
the town fired 220 rounds of
artillery, field reports said. The
attack was much lighter than
in the earlier days of the siege.
Fighting continued along
bloody Highway 13 as a Saigon
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relief column still tried in vain
to reach An Loc's battered'de-
fenders.
The sweep, above Hue was di-
rected at the 48th Regiment of
North Vietnam's 304B Division.
The paratroopers planned to
first ask for surrender 'with
loudspeakers and pamphlets.
American military sources
said it was possible that Gen.
Creighton Abrams, U.S. com-
mander in Vietnam, would leave
for reassignment within the
month despite the offensive.
Abrams, 57, is considered a
leading candidate for the post
of U.S. Army chief of staff.
Warran"ts
i0ss uudin
Diag dig
(Continued from Page 1)
may rest upon whether the
prosecutor can prove that the
crater sites were on an appur-
tenance of University buildings.
Appurtenance is a vague legal
term meaning connected to or
part of real propertyf.
"If I didn't think that the
grounds were part of the Uni-
versity's real property I wouldn't
have charged them under that
statute" said County Prosecutor
William Delhey last night.
The University had warned
the diggers that they, were in
violation of the law and would
be prosecuted if dug on the Diag
sites. The University had offered
the anti-war group an alternative
site on the mall between the
Michigan League.
The demonstrators objected to
the small site because, as one
rally speaker put it, "We want
it (the crater) to be a daily vis-
ible reminder of what the coun-
tryside of Vietnam looks like."

PRESIDENT NIXON is greeted by members of Congress following his speech on arms limitations last
night. The President talked of his trip to Moscow and the summit conference there, urging approval
of the agreements he signed.
1xona asks eonr'essional OK
for U.S.-So Viet arms treaty

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(Continued from Page 3)
hour after arriving from War-
saw. After landing at Andrews
Air Force Base, he flew by heli-
copter to the Capitol.
The President's 13-day trip,
besides Russia, included Aus-
tria, Iran and Poland.
Nixon sought to head off any
concern that the Strategic Arms
Limitation agreements - SALT
- had endangered American
security as charged by some cri-
tics, such as Sen. Henry Jack-
son (D-Wash).
"I have studied the strategic
balance in great. detail with
my senior advisers for more
than three years," the President
told an audience that broke into
frequent applause during his
presentation. He went on:
"I can assure the Congress
and the American people to-
night that the present and
planned strategic forces of the
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United States are without ques-
tion sufficient for the mainte-
nance of our security and the
protection of our vital interests.
No power on earth is stronger.
than the United States of
America today. None will be
stronger than the United States
of America in the near future."
The arms control agreements,
signed last Friday, provide that
both nations will be limited to
their current arsenal of offen-
sive weapons, with the exception
that improvements will be allow-
ed and programs already under
way can be completed.
They also provide each nation
can establish two defensive mis-
sile sites, one to protect each
nation's capital, the other to
shield one selected offensive mis-
sile location.
The President said these agree-
ments, the offensive section in
the form of an executive agree-
ment and the defensive portion
formulated as a treaty, is a step
that hass "enhanced the security
of both notions."
In reviewing the other areas
discussed during his stay in Mos-

cow, the President said Vietnam
"was one of the most exten-
sively discussed subjects of our
agenda."
However, he said to provide
details of discussions concerning
the war "would only jeopardize
the search for peace."
He added, however: "I will
simply say this: Each side ob-
viously has its own point of view
and its own approach to this
very difficult issue."
Concerning trade between the
two nations, the President said
negotiations are proceeding on
schedule and that a comprehen-
sive trade agreement between
the world's most powerful capi-
talist nation and the strongest
Communist country can be ex-
pected to be signed "later this
year."
The President remarked upon
the other agreements reached
during his t3days abroad, which
included accords on environ-
mental quality, medical science
and health, technology and
science, joint space ventures and
a pact to reduce the chance of
dangerous incidents between na-
val ships and aircraft at sea.

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NEXT: "ONE IS A LONELY NUMBER"

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