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May 27, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-27

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.Saturday. Moy 27. 1972

Page wo TE MIHIGADAIY4ro, , 1 97

Program Information 434-1782
3020 Washtenow

U.S., Soviets sign arms accord Diems vie in

Jury Prize Award
Winner 1972
Cannes Film Festival
KURT VONNEGUT JR'S
"SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
FIVE"
N A WAR$MLPCURE"ICNNICOLOR*
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

(Continued from Page 1)
"absolutely essential" for the
United States to forge ahead
with a new long-range sub-
marine missile system.
The agreement on offensive
missiles will have a five-year
lifetime-a period during which
the two sides will-probably at-
tempt to reach a more perman-
ent treaty.
Even so, the treaty covering.
ABMs permits either country to
pull out on the agreement upon
six month's notice.
Under the provision allowing
improvement of existing systems,
the Soviet Union could push
aheadawith reported plans to re-
place all 288 SS9 offensive mis-
siles with larger ones capable of
carrying 20 warheads each
e q u i p p e d with 50-megaton
bombs.
The treaty also allows the

United States to go ahead with
installation of multiple war-
heads on its long-range offen-
sive missiles.
The signing ceremony in the
Kremlin followed two and a half
years- of low-level negotiations
alternating between Vienna and
Helsinki.
High administration officials
disclosed weeks ago that agree-
ment in principle on the arms
freeze had been reached at the
Helsinki negotiations.
All five other executive agree-
ments signed at the Kremlin
since the summit began had all
been arranged before Nixon left
the United States and were
brought to Moscow for final ac-
tion.
Observers indicate that the
agreement on arms limitation
may have been wrapped up be-
fore Nixon left Washington,
despite announcements of minor

the ann crbor film coopera e
ANIMATED BEATLES in GEORGE DUNNING'S
YELLO SUMRN
All you need is love, Luv! Design by Heinz Edelmann
"Please see it more than once!"-FILMS IN REVIEW
TUESDAY-May 30th - ONLY!
aud. a, ongell hall-35 mm COLOR-G-7, 8:45, & 10:30 p.m.-$1
Tickets for all three shows on sale outside the auditorium at 6 p.m.
COMING THURSDAY, JUNE 1st COMING TUESDAY, JUNE 6th
7 & 9p.m. 7 &9 p.m.
ROMAN POLANSKI'S WEIRD
ROSEMARY'S BABY HEART-STOPPING SUSPENSE!
with MIA FARROW and JOHN CASSAVETES WAIT UNTIL DARK
SEX AND THE OCCULT with AUDREY HEPBURN and ALAN ARKIN
WE HAVE RAISED OUR ADMISSION PRICE TO $1
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative is established to promote and support filmmaking in the
community. Any profits earned at our film showings are invested in the cooperative's editing
and production equipment, our film school, grants to community filmmakers, our 8mm festival
and other projects. It is to increase the effectiveness of the cooperative that prices have been
raised. Anyone interested in the cooperative or its activities is always encouraged to seek
membership and to patronize our showings.

discord the last few days in
Moscow.
They established a cooperative
program to put a U.S.-Soviet
space team in orbit by 1975, ex-
panded exchanges in environ-
mental, medical and technologi-
cal issues and set new rules to
a v o i d confrontaiton-provoking
incidents on or above the high
seas.
The commercial commission
outlined in a communique sign-
ed by the leaders will pursue
negotiations on such issues as
reciprocal reduction of trade
barriers, the availability of U.S.
credits for Soviet industrial ex-
pansion and reciprocal estab-
lishment of business facilities
by each side in the other's
country.
Still to be settled is a multi-
million-dollar grain purchase
the Russians are seeking from
America's bulging stockpiles.
Informants said the commis-
sion was the very minimum the
two sides could have settled for
in economic matters and still
maintain so impresison of pro-
gress.
Disarmament advocates are
hoping this initial arms limita-
tion agreement will have signifi-
cant impact in future rounds of
big power negotiations on a more
far-reaching agreement.
(6) With nothing but a 3-pint and
a 5-pint . container, how do you
easure one pint of liquid? (there's
an indefinite supply at liquid). Ans-
wer see nrxt Sat. Daily.
0 . A -
_ o
thru
Classified

t'alitornia
By The Associated rers
Sens. Hubert Humphrey and
George McGovern pressed their
campaigns in the California
Democratic presidential primary
yesterday, with Humphrey ap-
plauding the U.S.-Soviet arms
limitation agreement and Mc-
Govern assailing President Nix-
on's economic policies.
Humphrey, speaking to a
luncheon group in San Francisco,
said of the arms limitation an-
nouncement yesterday in Mos-
cow: "I've put about 15 years
of my life into this, so I can't
help but feel gratification over
what has been accomplished so
far."
Humphrey said that although
he had been opposed to the orig-
inal ABM concept, he had en-
couraged continuing the prelimi-
nary deployment of them to en-
able the United States to nego-
tiate arms control from a posi-
tion of strength.
McGovern asserted yesterday
that Nixon's economic policies
"are driving the average family
into debt while the giant corpora-
tions are eating high off the
hog."
In a speech before unemployed
aerospace workers being retrain-
ed in Palo Alto, near San Fran-
cisco, McGovern said Humphrey
is telling aerospace workers
"that just believing in more jobs
will make it come true; that
once the election is over some
mystical plan-now secret-will
appear and put them all back
to work."
McGovern likened this "mysti-
cal plan" with what he said was
President Nixon's secret plan in
the 1968 campaign to end the
Vietnam war.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SUNDAY, MAY 28
TV Center Filn: "Worlds of Abraham
Kaplan: Technology," WWJ-TV, Chan-
nel 4, noon.
MONDAY, MAY 29
Memorial Day holiday
Carillon Concert: Hudson Ladd,
University carillonneur, Burton Me-
morial Tower, 7 p.m.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
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POSITIVELY P L EASE DO
NOT REVEAL THE IDENT-
ITY OF THE HIJACKER,
HE IS A GENUINE KILLER!
PG

CHARLTON HSTON
YVETTE MIMIEUX

WORSHIP

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Services of Worship-9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-
Sermon Topic: "How Patriotic Was Jesus?"
Preaching: Robert E. Sanders.
College Class at 10:30 a.m. - Contemporary
Christian Faith.
Student Coffee Hour and Discussion--1 1 :30.
Holy Communion-5:15 Thursday.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.--Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00-noon.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
11:00 a.m.-Coffee and conversation in the
lounge.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Canpus -
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH, formerly the Lutheran
Student Chapel ond Center
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday, 10:15 a.m.-Eucharist.
Wednesday, 5:15 p.m.-Eucharist.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
at 330 Maynard St.
(The Alley/The Conspiracy)
Canterbury House, meeting at 330 Maynard
St. (The Conspiracy), 11:00 a.m. -
Eucharist.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(LCMS) 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Schelps, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Bible Clsss at 10:30 a.w.j
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
9:00 a.m.---Morning Prayer,
10:00 a.m.--Worship Service and Church
School.

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