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May 26, 1972 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-26

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Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1972 News Phone: 764-0552
And the 1)us goes on
GOVERNMENT IS compromise, Henry Clay surely said.
And that was before the days of cross' district busing.
The Senate's latest contortions on the busing issue
have the dubious distinction of doing virtually nothing.
The Senate compromised Wednesday on a set of bus-
ing amendments that have an awful bark, but a skimpy
bite.
The anti-busing flavor satisfied the southerners and
conservatives. The ineffectuality of the legislation kept
most of the Senate liberals from opposing the entire
higher education bill.
The bill's backers hope similar reactions will allow
passage in the House.
THE BILL PROHIBITS the use of federal funds for
busing to achieve desegregation unless a local school
district asks for money. This is an illusory stricture.
A school district that must bus will use funds from
anywhere it can get them.
Neither would busing be financed if the distance is
so great as to harm the children or if children are moved
to inferior schools. However, no court has yet ordered
any busing that the judge felt would harm children -
and little busing has yet been initiated that moves chil-
dren to legally and demonstrably inferior schools.
A third provision directs federal officials not to re-
quire or induce local administrators to spend state or
local money for busing - unless it is required by the
Constitution. This one seems the silliest, since every bus-
ing order is expressly based on what the judge rules are
the dictates of the Constitution.
And finally, the bill would provide for a stay of all
federal district court busing orders up to Dec. 31, 1973-
or until all appeals have been exhausted. But once again,'
it is entirely unclear whether busing in any district
would ever begin before all appeals in that case were
exhausted-or even if the busing began, what authority a
Congressional dictum could possibly have to stop it.
SOONEROR later the whole issue will fall in the lap
of the Supreme Court.
Why can't the senators equivocate about something
else?
-ARTHUR LERNER
Gr~ !'tc ta D it

Discriminating judgment,
Spiro-think and the SST

By ARTHUR LERNER
T HE $21.5 billion higher educa-
tion bill passed by the Sen-
ate Wednesday has a lot more than
ati-busing 'previsions in it. It
slso contains sweeping innova-
tions and programs for higher
education.
While Congress has been fid-
dling with the bill, the University
has been finalizing the job descrip-
tion outline for the new affirms-
tine action director, to he ap-
pointed by July 1.
Discrimination against women
in admissions to all public univer-
sities, including this one, will be
banned if the bill becomes law.
One of the director's duties will
be to define and refine the Uni-
versity's program to comply with
all laws and regulations appli-
cable in the affirmative action
area, the University Record re-
ported Monday.
Therefore, when the bill is fin-
ally approved by the House it
would be consistent for the new
affirmative action director to
have a "refining and defining"
role in University admissions pol-
icies to eliminate discrimination.
And this is exactly how mem-
bers of the University's Commis-
sion for Women feel.
THE NEW guardian of minority
and women's rights, however, will
probably have no jurisdiction over
admissions policy.
President Robben Fleming
doesn't want the director to be
involved with admissions. He fears
that the job would become too
"complicated" and he wants to

"keep admissions out of the baili-
wick" of the new affirmative ac-
tion director.
REMEMBI It THE Concorde, the
Anglo-French version of the SST.
Its developers are experiencing
an exotic disease endemic to the
Americas. It s called cost.us over-
runns
AMERICAN manufacturing pro-
fits were ip 19 per cent in 1971
over 1970.
Ford President Lee Iococca drew
a $189,000 raise last year. Now
retired chairman of the board of
General Motors James Roche pul-
led in over $835.000 in compensa-
tion last year.
There have been more unem-
ployed people in Michigan this
year and last than in any period

Pres. Fleming
since 1961. The total number of
hours worked in manufacturing in
the state in February of this year,.
for example, wasethetlooest for
at month in over ten years.
But Vice President Spiro Agnew
doesn't want Americans to get
the wrong idea.
The vice president told a con-
ference of corporation executives
recently that "Americans are less
than enchanted with businessmen.
They think you are raking in
profits in prodigious amounts.
They are convinced that you
haven't a care in the world."
Y
HE . EXPLAINED that the 19
at Photo per cent increase in profits figure
is terribly misleading. In actual-
ro. Wallace ity, he noted, profits only went

V.P. Agnew
up from 4 cents on the dollar to
4.2 cents in 1971.
With sales of about a billion
dollars, that's an increase of $2,-
000,000 in profits - about 19 per
cent.
* * *
BEFORE he was shot, George
Wallace talked a lot about the
"average man" and big govern-
ment that likes to "tax, tax, tax
and spend, spend, spend."
But if Wallace's home state is
an example of "little guy" popul-
ism, some of his supporters are
in for some bad news.
Alabama has one of the most re-
gressive tax structures in t h e
country. Big business, big farm-
ers, and timber operators hold
tremendous tax advantages in a
"welfare chiseler" state that re-
ceives far more money from the
federal government than it pays in
taxes.
And the state is last on the list
in per pupil expenditures for edu-
cation.
Letters to The Daily should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to M a r y
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should
not exceed 250 words. The
Editorial Directors reserve the
right to edit all letters sub-
mitted.
- --;r

NIGHT EDITOR: CHRIS PARKS
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR: ARTHUR LERNER
ASSISTANT NIGHT EDITOR: MERYL GORDON
PHOTO TECHNICIAN: ROLFE TESSEM

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