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May 24, 1972 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-05-24

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Wednesday, May 24, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, May 24, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Visitors to
Fleming
tabulated
(Continued from Page 3)
or without first checking with
the secretary, practices that
many of the male visitors were
not obliged to observe.
The group submitted these
findings to Fleming, who "could
not deny" the conclusions, ac-
cording to a published report.
The AHCCTPFDNMW sug-
gested that Fleming "begin in-
terchanges with women at an
informal level, to familiarize
himself with women's activities
and arguments." The group also
recommended the't more women
should occupy high-level posi-
tions to exercise influence on
decision-making.
The Commission for Women
is organizing a series of "sum-
mer seminars" with Fleming.
Suggested topics of discussion
include Affirmative Action as
an Affirmation, and Recruit-
ment of Women.
The first discussion on Wom-
en in Research is planned for
May 26.
Day-care bill
(Continued from Page 3)
which shows a demand for ser-
vices and has the resources to
carry out the program
According to the bill, every
prime sponsor will establish a
Child and Family Services
Council composed of parents of
children in the program and
community m emb e rs. The
Council will approve program
statements, basic goals, poli-
cies, procedures, and the selec-
tion or establishment and re-
newal or the child care pro-
grams.
Therefore, the bill provides for
programs that can be designed
to fit the specific needs of lo-
Cal residents.
Once a unit has been declar-
ed a prime sponsor, the bill
stipulates, that unit is eligible
for direct funding from HEW.
In response to Nixon's ob-
jections to the earlier bill, the
money authorized for the pro-
gram has been cut 40 per cent.
State participation has been
increased in the program by re-
ducing by two-thirds the num-
ber of local communities eligi-
ble to administer their own
programs, and by reducing the
power of the Child and Family
Service Councils in favor of
mayoral and local government
power.
The effective date of the bill
has also been postponed for one
year. If the bill is passed, the
program will be detailed in 1973
and implemented in 1974-1975.
A spokeswoman for the Chil-
dren and Youth Subcommittee
commented on the arguments
against the bill, saying "Some
senators feel it's going to lead
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School bd. election nears War protester arrested

(Continued from Page 3)
programs meaningful to the
neighborhood should be adopted."
The degree of implementation
of the humaneness report is also
beingdebated. The board voted
to accept the report, which
shows how to bring equal op-
portunity to the schools. Present-
ly, the board is spending $130,000
to implement the plan. Some
members question its value in
terms of priority. "Out of all
this excellence," asks Trustee
Theodore Heusel, "why is it that
some of our children can not
read?"
Innovative programs such as
the community school which al-
lows studettot work in real-life
situations like lsw firms please
the school board. Again, the ex-
tent to which new projects will
be developed is a question.
"None would deny that we have
had a misallocation of funds in
the past," said Trustee Paul
Carrigan. "The question is, how
do we correct it?"
Student rights, ageism and
sexism are unfamiliar terms to
the trustees. For the most. part,
they feel these issues are not of
great importance.
introduced
to communal living, others feel
that it's an unnecessary seduc-
tion to middle-class mothers to
farm out their children, de-
stroying family life.
"One man feared that al-
though the program is vol-
untary, it might eventually be-
come mandatory, like public
school."
However, she said she felt
the bill would pass both the
House and the Senate, and . be
signed by Nixon. "It's an elec-
tion year, and besides, Nixon
got a lot of bad publicity when
he vetoed the last bill."

The lack of finances and the
apparent unwillingness of voters
to increase revenues is another
problem facing the school board.
In addition, if the governor's
plan to replace property tax with
an income tax as the source of
school funding is implemented,
the city may lose a great deal
of money.
Trustee Robert Conn comments
that the public demands "more
efficiency and increased produc-
tivity" from its schools. He also
adds that this is "difficult to
come up with."
Running for the three seats
are incumbants Cecil Warner,
Ronald Bishop and Henry John-
son, as well as NancyeBrussello,
Curtis Halt, Clarence Dukes,
Marilyn Martin, Lettie Wickliffe,
Sonia Yaco and Gretchen Wilson.
McGovern wins
(Continued from Page 1)
-McCloskey 338-6 per cent.
-Ashbrook 176-3 per cent.
-Uncommitted 153-3 per cent.
In Rhode Island, McGovern
showed substantial strength in
the suburban cities outside Prov-
idence, tallying more than 2-1
margins in ^many of those com-
munities. He also led in most of
the rural towns.
The voter turnout, as predict-
ed by election officials, was very
light in the state's first presi-
dentist primary.
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(Continued from Page 1)
The arrest of Kunnes was
initiated by the University. Ac-
cording to court officials and
the city attorney's office, a war-
rant was issued for Kunnes' ar-
rest following a complaint by
University security official Wal-
ter Stevens.
Stevens yesterday declined to
say whether complaints were
filed against other persons in
connection with the incident.
Detective Jerry Wright of the,
Ann Arbor Police Department
said yesterday, however, that
"the case is still open."
Kunnes' attorney, Perry Bul-
lard, yesterday complained of
police procedures in connection
with the arrest. "Kunnes was
finger printed and booked," he
said "This is a very serious thing
for a mere littering charge."
City Attorney Jerold Lax said
that the booking procedure was

necessary becoause Kunnes had
fled from the scene where the
alleged crime was committed.
While walking downtown to
the police station to turn him-
self in yesterday afternoon,
Kunnes discussed his case.
While maintaining that, he
was not guilty of any crime,"
Kunnes said he felt the spilling
of tomato juice was important
because "it symbolized the blood
the the people of Vietnam which
is on the hands of the Regents"'
because of University classified
research projects which have
helped to develop weapons used
in Indochina.
"Littering," he said, "is going
on everyday at the University.
No damage was done and no one
was hurt. The University is just
trying to harrass me."

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