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May 15, 1974 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, May 1 5 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nne

City, tizens argue over Program gives varied services

Cssssinued from Page B).
mpts to create a "higher lev-
controleModelCities empontiy" -

Montinued from Page 8)
crat who served several years
on the Policy Board, contends,
"We started off from the very
beginning arguing for citizen
control in this program and
said we were not interested in
doing something that the city
was going to have control over."
The Model Cities program
was in fact virtually under Poli-
cy Board control in the begin-
ning. The structure, responsibili-
ties and power in the Model
Cities program are defined un
der city ordinance.
The Model Cities program was
meant to last five years, the
first year labeled a planning
year and the rest "action
years." Under the ordinance
structuring Model Cities during
the planning year, the Policy
Board held nearly total author-
ity over the program and exer-
cised it.
THEN IN the spring of 1970,
as the beginning of the first
action year was approaching,
HUD told the city government
and Model Cities officials that
the Policy Board possessed too
much power.
The result was a change in
the Model Cities ordinance and
a bitter political fight with un-
restrained name - calling and
hard feelings between Demo-
cratic Mayor Robert Harris and
the leaders of the Policy Board,
including Wheeler and chair-
man Ezra Rowry.
The focal point of the argu-
ment was the administrative
structure, and specifically the
relationship of the CDA director
to the Policy Board and the
Citv Council.
THE POLICY Board's com-
plaint, in Wheeler's words, was
that under the new ordinance
the director "no longer worked
for "s, but for the Mayor."
"The Policy Board agreed
that it as a policy - making
body was being disenfranchis-
ed," odds Rowry.
Htarris, whose term as Mayor
ended in April. 1972, would not
talk to The Daily about Model
Cities, but when the Policy
Board filed a lawsuit against the
city and TrUD in 1972, Harris
testified that the 1970 ordinance
was the best compromise that
could be made in view of the
position HUD was taking.
BASICALLY, the 1970 ordi-
nance stated that the CDA di-
rector and administrative staff
would report both to the mayor
and City Council and to the
Policy Board. In reality, over
the next two years the Policy
Board did maintain direct con-
trol over the CDA director and
all Policy Board recommenda-
IUAE ttY
A RMY
WE'RE
PLEASED
TO
ANNOUNCE
A
SECOND
ANN ARBOR
LOCATION
201
E. WASHINGTON
tents " pants 0 surplus
sleeping bags
BACKPACKER'S
SUPPLY DEPOT
201 E. Washington
f ot 4th)

994-3572
1166 Broadway
north of Broodwov bride) )
769-9247
OPEN MON-SAT. 9-6

tions were approved by the
City Council.
In 1972, however, the Policy
Board demanded that the City
Council fire the present CDA
director, Herbert Wingo. The
City Council unanimously re-
fused to do so and the issue of
Policy Board control over the
program, including the right to
hire and fire the staff, was re-
kindled.
The Policy Board claimed it
had been reduced to advisory
status and went to federal dis-
trict court to force the city to
fire Wingo. They eventually
lost.
IN THE MEANTIME, accord-
ing to Harris' court testimony,
the Policy Board "took a walk"
and refused to work on pressing
budgetary matters with either
the mayor and council or the
CDA director.
The end result was a new
city ordinance passed in De-
cember 1972 which made the
CDA director directly responsi-
ble to the city administrator and
completely removed the Policy
Board from the chain of com-
mand. The result, Policy Board
members assert, is a citizens'
group with no power and little
effectiveness.
$2.50
FRI-SAT.-SUN.
Adeiphi Records'
Paul
Geremia

dcl Cities residents by plazing
them' in jobs with public non-
pofit organizations su;h as
%, hools and local governmen's
and enabling them to receive ed-
teation and training at the same
time.
The program has a caaaci y
foe 10 people, and is presently
serving 50 people with a bdget
of $86,000 per year.
AT PRESENT the five maor
Model Cities operating agencies
incltde the Youth Development
Team, the Child Care Center,
the Transportation Project, the
Dental Health Clinic and the
Community Skills Center.
Youth Development, accord-
ing to the central administra-
tion, works to "orient youth to
the process of decision-making
and enhance their knowledge of
operation of various private and
publfc institutions." In addition
to such "tutorial" work, t h e
program offers recreation to
Model Cities youth, specifically
the popular nightly roller skat-
ing program at Slauson Junior
High School.

The Child Care Center is li-
censed for SO children from two
and a half to five years of age.
Parents can enroll their chill-
ren in the Child Care Center on
an ability-to-pay basis.
Model Cities owns three huses
and a van for its Transportation
Project. The buses do run some
routes on a regular basis for
the use of Model Neighborhoo.]
residents, but much of the vehi-
cles' use is in conjunction witA
the other programs when trara-
portation is needed.
ONE OF THE most successful
of the operating agencies is the
Dental Health Clinic. Accorling
to the administration, the clinic
has provided dea:al care to
more than 11,000 patients since
its establishment in March, 1971.
Many of those treated had had
no previous dental care. Tke
the Child Care Center, the cht'-
ic provides service on an abil-
ity-to-pay basis.
The Community Skills Center
provides classes and counseling
for Model Neighborhood stu-
dents who are temporarily or
permanently out of the school
system. The center serves ap-
proximately - 35 young people

each semester.
The Ann' Arbor Model Neigh-
borhood largely comprises t h e
area known locally as "north
central."
At least 60 per -ent of the
area's residents are black and
in 1969 the neithbrhood had a -
average household income of
$6,0000, in c'rtrast to the city a
average of $18,000.
Daily Official Bulletin
Wednesday, May 15
Day Calendar
Psychiatry: Robert Burt, "wisy
Keep the Doctors from my Cent:
A Lawyer's Rreections on the De-
trait Psychosurgery Trial," CP't
Aud., 10:15 am.
Commission for women Meeting:
Reents' Rm.. neon.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SA, 764-7456
Interviewing on Campus, Tuesday,
June 4: IBM -- for various Loca-
tions BS/S: All disciplines for
Marketl &s System Engim.
Trainees & 05/55: Comp. geL,,
Math. Physics, chem. or equivalent
for System Analysis & Program-
ming. nec. '73. May '74 and Spring-
Summer grads are encoeaged to
astn up for an interview at CP&P.

v

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