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August 23, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-08-23

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Fridoy, August 23, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAIL
Preferential balloting to
be on November ballot II hIc

By BARBARA CORNELL
In next April's city election,
Ann Arbor voters may be able
to rank the mayoral candidates
in order of preference rather
than casting a ballot for a single
hopeful.
All that will come to pass if
a proposed City Charter amend-
ment appearing on the Novem-
ber 5 general electionb allot
authorizing preferential voting
is approved.
THE HUMAN Rights Party
(ttRP) conducted a petition
drive this summer to get the
issue placed before the voters.
Earlier this week City Clerk
Jerome Weiss validated those
petitions-meaning the amend-
ment will be on the ballot.
Under the proposed preferen-
tial voting system, voters cast
both first and second choice
ballots for mayoral candidates.
In the event no candidate gar-
ners a majority of first place
votes, consideration of second
place tallies goes into effect.
The candidates receiving the
lowest first choice vote total is
dropped from consideration. The
second choices of those persons
who cast their first place votes
for that candidate are then
counted.
THESE VOTEStare then dis-
tributed among the remaining
mayoral contestants. The pro-
cess-dropping a candidate and
considering his supporters' sec-
ond choice votes-continues un-

til one hopeful receives a clear-
cut majority of ballots.
IIRP spokesman David Good-
stan said that the party pro-
posed the system to "eliminate
the d-ngers of vote-solitting"
hetwreen the Democrat and IRP
candidates. Ile claims that split-
ti-2 is resonsible for the "mi-
nority' Ren-blican - controlled
towernment now in city hall.
At one time preferential vot-
ing wos used in eight or nine
cities across the state bit was
dis-ontinsed over 25 years ago.
Goodman explained that with
the emergence of a third party
in Ant Arbor nreferential elec-
tions h-ae become necessary.
HRP HOPES that the prefer-
ential system will "see that the
mayor is relatively acceptable
to the majority of voters," ac-
cording to Goodman. He claims
Mayor James Stephenson is not
acceptable.
Stephenson was elected in
1973 with slightly less than 50
per cent of the vote and his
success was in part attributed
to vote splitting in the city's
liberal-radical constituency.
Goodman said that HRP pro-
posed preferential voting for the
mayor's race only because to
institute it on a ward by ward
basis for City Council represen-
tatives would be "unfair,"
HRP has long considered the
ward system to be an inad-
equate means of electing coun-
cil members.

House unit says
Nixon broke law

Continued from Pate i1
"WE FEEL constrained to
point out, however, that it was
Richard Nixon who impeded the
FBI's investigation of the Wa-
tergate affair by wrongfully
attempting to implicate the
Central Intelligence Agency,"
the minority report says.
Freshmen to
face housing
shortage
(Continued from Pate3)
"The freshman will be taken
care of and will have rooms to
stay in," Feldkamp says. "But
in strange ways."
LAST YEAR, 23 students were
billeted at the Bell Tower Hotel
for nearly two months until
space became available in the
dorms. That cost the University
up to $7.60 per day per student
more than if they had stayed
in the residence halls,
And despite the initial allure
of living in a hotel, the students
quickly became disenchanted
with the arrangements.,The 23
constantly found themselves
shifted from room to room to
make space for arriving con-
vention delegations and other
guests.
"We've been reduced to living
out of suit cases," one of the
students moaned last September.
"And believe me, it's no fun."
Feldkamp, however, refuses to
view the current housing dilem-
ma as bleak, because he hopes
a number of students will short-
ly cancel their dorm reserva-
tions.
He adds that temporarily hous-
ing students in the hotel is the
best solution. "We will not over-
crowd our residence halls to
provide the necessary spaces,"
Feldkamp says. "We could
squeeze an extra bed in here
and there, but we will not jam
more persons than there should
be in a room."

"It was Richard Nixon, who
created and preserved the evi-
dence of that transgression and
who, knowing that it had been
subpoenaed by this committee
and the special prosecutor, con-
cealed its terrible import, even
from his own counsel, until he
could do so no longer," they
added.
Nine of the 10 restated their
opposition to Articles II and III,
but Rep. Wiley Mayne (R-Iowa)
said the evidence released on
Aug. S would also have caused
him to support Article II if it
had been available when the
committee voted.
At the center of the major-
ity's case for the second and
third articles is Nixon's rela-
tionship with his chief White
House aides, H. R. "Bob" Hal-
deman and John Ehrlichman
and former Atty. Gen. Jahn
Mitchell.
Through the testimony of wit-
nesses and other evidence, the
majority constructs a picture of
a president firmly in charge of
the White House and his re-
election campaign and fully in-
formed of everything his asto-
ciates were doing.
The dissenting Republicans re-
jected the view that Nixon knew
everything his aides were doing.
Also included in the report
were statements in support of
the articles which the commit-
tee discussed but rejected, one
dealing with the secret bomb-
ing in Cambodia and another
with Nixon's income tax pay-
ments.
Classified

Alphabet bomber
Muharem Kurbegovic, arrested Tuesday night In connection with the bombing of los Angeles
International Airport, is silent, as he has been since his arrest, as he is led to a Los Angeles court-
room yesterday. He was arraigned on three counts of murder and other charges. Three were
killed and many injured in the Aug. 6 bombing. Kurbegovic, 31, is an alien from Yugoslavia.
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