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August 21, 1974 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-08-21

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Wednesday, August 21, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SECOND PENALTY IN EIGHT YEARS:

11in
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (AP- Ath-
letic Director Cecil Coleman
said yesterday the University of
Illinois will accept without ap-
peal the punishment imposed
for recruiting violations.
"We felt we received a very
fair hearing," Coleman said at
a news conference. "There are
some parts of the penalties we
disagreed with. We think we
can live with the penalty.
"We're going to take a very
positive attitude and we're not
going to cry about the penal-
ty," he said. "We had viola-
tions, and we're going to pay
for it."
The National Collegiate Ath-
letic Association announced
that the Illini basketball team
would be on probation for two
years. It is prohibited from
participating in post-season
competition and being on
NCAA-controlled television for
one year. The penalty also lim-
its the number of basketball
scholarships which can be of-
fered to three for each of the
next two years.
Gene Bartow, who is starting
his first season as Illini basket-
ball coach, said he remains con-
fident despite the probation.
"I feel the penalties that we
have received should not really
hurt our effort to dt what we
were hired to do-that is, build
a good basketball program,"
said Bartow, who appeared with
Coleman at a press conference.
Bartow said the scholarship
limitation will demand more
careful recruiting.
"I don't feel we are limited
all that much," he said. "We
will have to recruit vigorously
and make sure we get three top
players, and we feel we can do
this."
Col-man explained that the
nenalties were imposed for nu-
merous violations, most of
them involving offering such
things as meals, transporta-
tion, and other favors to ath-
letes without charge.
One assistant football coach,
Gary Golden, was publicly rep-
rimanded specifically for his
part in the violations. Golden is
prohibited from directly or in-
directly recruiting for one year,
Coleman said.
Golden was accused of pro-
viding transportation and ar-
ranging for free meals for ath-
letes in violation of NCAA rules.
Coleman confirmed that one as-
sistant football coach was ac-
cused of providing bail money

accepi
to obtain an athlete's release Coler
from jail. He would not identify have
the coach, but said it was not thei
Golden, as earlier reported by prove
the NCAA. Illin
"He did commit three viola- Black:
tions and should have known confer
better," Coleman said of Gold- cusset
en. "They are violations that his as
we've certainly cautioned all of Blac
our coaches against in the fu- did w
ture. But I don't feel they are wish
of a serious magnitude."
Illinois has been punished
twice in less than seven years
by the NCAA. The so-called
slush fund scandal of 1966 re-
sulted in the forced resignation
of three coaches, permanent
ineligibility of five athletes
and a two-year school proba-
tion.
"The University of Illinois is
now a two-time loser," Cole-
man said. "We cannot afford,
under any stretch of the imagi-
nation, to go three times. Be-
cause they'll just throw the book
completely at us. I think it
would terminate what we know
now as the intercollegiate ath-
letic program at the University
of Illinois."
University Chancellor J. W.
Peltason issued a statement
saving, "We deeply regret that
any infractions of NCAA regu-
lations took place, and we are
determined to prevent any repe-
tition of them."
The Big Ten Conference also
cold take action against the
University of Illinois, Coleman
said, "But we don't anticipate
that a penalty by the Big Ten
would be any more restrictive
than that of the NCAA."
Coach Bartow squelched re-
ports that he or incoming bas-
ketball star Audie Matthews
planned to sue the NCAA in
the matter.
"I asked Audie about this and
he said he didn't know where in
the world something like this
would come from," Bartow
said. "As far as I'm concerned,
I plan no suits." Nin
In response to the infractions, wor
Coleman said the ruling would Vien
limit the formation of so-called
booster clubs, which are or-
ganized to support athletic
teams. He also said identifica-U
tion cards would be issued to
all official athletic representa-
tives with expiration dates on B
the cards for control purposes.
"There is no question in our
minds that we can run an hon-
est and successful inter-
collegiate athletic program,"

man
to
doub
e it
ois
man
enc
d the
ssista
kma
'hat
to p
N
eteer
ld m
na.

said
cheat
ters,
to you
footb
also
e at
e NCA
ant, G
an sa
it ha
put thi

NCAA ruling
. "You don't right light because a very ca- for their having him to dinner.
to win. And for pable and great coach's life- Blackman said Golden, his
we're going to time profession is in jeopardy." former aide at Dartmouth, was
." Blackman explained that not involved in "the lavish
all coach Bob Golden earlier this year had wrongdoing that people have
held a news arranged home transportation been led to believe."
which he dis- for an already-signed Illinois Golden commented that. "I
A implication of football recruit who was
olden, stranded at Chicago's O'Hare did not act with wrong iten-
id, "The NCAA Airport, and also had the re- tions, but rather with sincere
d to do, but I cruit's parents for dinner at concern for a player I recruit-
is thing in the his home as a return courtesy ed."

New World Record
n-year-old Andras Hargitay of Hungary streaks through the pool on his way to a new
nark in the 400-meter-individual medley at the European Swimming Championships in
His time was 4:28.89.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
PRESENTS
PEOPLE APE BETTEP
OFF IN ZOOS
A PLAY ABOUT THE PARIS COMMUNE OF 1871
BY NEW YOPK PLAYWRIGHT Ardre / Wiler
( \ a
FRlEt At)MIttION 4'
AIJGU8T 22-24, 8PM, ArENAw THEATFIE,FI1IEZE BLGO.
children under twelve not admitted

ANN ARBOR AREA PREMIERE!
FILMS WHICH
REFUSE TO
FADE AWAY
A newcomer to tis list
of "found" movies is "The
Harder They Csme," the
first Jamaican f e a t u r e
ever made and the only
¢rfilm on the list that qual-
M~s.:..ii 5 ,as atrue original, a
MOVI OF HE EAR! H i~ s mvie s goad that it de-
MOVIE OF THE YEAR! V"evesso mewhat o re
-Rolling Stone than the limited cult it -
M M tention it is now receiv-
Mo~azine is hen it in shin
Featuring Reggae a iThursday Fi hts nly
music star, Screening Room.
Jimmy Cliff at .L when it f i r s t opened
here at the Embassy The-
"More wit, quts, humor and sheer exuberance than most ater in February of last
movies you'll see in any one year of movie goinq." year, "The Harder They
---Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times C o m e" received mostly
good notices and only one
or two unqualified raves. The business was okay but not great. In Boston, however, it played for
26 weeks last year at the Orson welle Cinema, and reopened there again on April 10, this year,
and is still playing. I think I can understand why, now that I've seen it at the Screening Room.
Although it's a sometimes technically ragged movie, "The Harder They Come" has more guts,
wit, humor and sheer exuberance than most movies you'll see in any one year of movie-going.
A lot of this-though not all-has to do with the superb music, Jamaican reggae (rhymes with
leggay), strictly local, highly syncopated rhythm and blues with associations ts rock and calypso.
The film was produced, co-written and directed by Perry Henzel, a white Jamaican with
experience at the B.B.C. and in industrial and documentary films, and it stars Jimmy Cliff, the
black Jamaican reggae star whose life story provides the raw material for a film that simultan-
eously explores a fantasy and satirizes it. This is not a movie to lift the hearts of the members
of the Jamaican Tourist Board. Its sympathy is with "the rudies," the jobless young men who
hang around Kingston street corners making rude remarks to people who could be tourists.
Although "The Harder They Come" takes place almost entirely in the Jamaicani's Jamaica
(there is only one short scene involving a resort hotel), and although it is very careful not to
portray whites as the oppressors (we see only blacks ripping off blacks), it is a more revolu-
tionary black film than any number of American efforts, including "Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss
Song." Its anger is less facile, more profoundly moving. Never for a minute is it confused with
self-pity, which, more than any other factor perhaps, gives the film its power as well as the
continuing appeal that won't let it get "lost."
-vincent Canby, New York Times, July 14, 1974
Definitely NOT Cancelled AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL
LAST TIMES TONIGHT-7:30 and 9:30 P.M. $1.50
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21
Original sound-track album (awarded Best Popular Music THURSDAY!
Sound-track album of the year) available on Island Records KING OF
at Discount Records stores, special at $4.09. HEARTS
e (g$1.2 7:3 ond 9:30 PM
$1.25

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