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August 07, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-08-07

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PageTwo

gHE MICtIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, August 7, 1974

In the news this morning

International
LAPITHOS, Cyprus - Turkish troops, mov-
ing behind rolling barrages of mortar and ar-
tillery fire, swarmed down from the foothills
of the Kyrenian mountains yesterday and sent
Greek Cypriot troops into retreat. It was the
heaviest fighting since the cease-fire was
signed in Geneva a week ago. A U. N. armor-
ed unit, on the appeal of a Greek Cypriot colo-
nel, tried to intervene in the fighting nine miles
west of Kyrenia. But the U.N. force quickly
pulled out of the area after a concentration
of mortar shells exploded nearby. The outburst
of fighting was the second major attempt by
Tur kish troops to wrest control of the strategic
western Kyrenian mountains from Greek
hands.
National
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger was given a clean bill of health by
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in
connection with his part in wiretapping of gov-
ernment officials and newsmen. The panel
agreed that Kissinger had not lied when he
said last year that his only role was to supply
names of National Security Council staff mem-
bers with access to information of the type be-
ing leaked to reporters. Kissinger had threat-
ened to resign unless he was cleared in the
controversy.
LOS ANGELES - A bomb explosion in a
Los Angeles International Airport terminal
building today killed two persons and injured
36 others, some critically, authorities said. A

paramedic said the dead "were so badly
blown apart I couldn't tell what sex they
were." The blast ripped through a lobby area
and a passenger tunnel to departing airliners
near the Pan American World Airways ticket
counter in the International Carriers Build-
ing. The bomb was apparently placed in or
near a bank of public lockers, police said.
NEW YORK (P) - The stock market surged
upward and then fell back again yesterday,
reacting with extreme sensitivity to each de-
velopment in a chain of events surrounding
impeachment and President Nixon's future in
office. The Dow Jones average of 30 industrial
stocks, which jumped 25.82 points in the first
half hour, had pulled back to 772.45, up 12.05,
by 1:30 p.m. The Dow was showing a gain of
about 19 points early in the afternoon, when
Cabinet members emerging from an urgent
meeting with Nixon in Washington quoted the
President as saying he would not resign, but
would, in the words of an aide, "fight on."
Analysts noted that prices almost immediate-
ly began to decline in accelerated trading.
Brokers had credited the early burst of buying
to a series of developments in Washington
over the past 24 hours.
Weather
It should be a nice day today with highs in
the mid 80's. It will be partly sunny with a
slight chance of thundershowers toward eve-

Esch backs
Nixon
ouster
U.S. Congressman Marvin
Esch (R-Ann Arbor) yesterday
announced he will vote for the
impeachment of President
Richard Nixon on the basis of
a presidential statement releas-
ed Monday.
In that statement, Nixon said
he tried to impede a Federal
Bureau of Investigation prote
into the Watergate orea-in six
days after the incident ; o a k
place.
"The President admitted to
an impeachable offense and I
will cast my vote for impea::h-
ment," Esch declarel. The
House is expected to vote on im-
peachment late this monh.
It was an easy decision, Esch
added, though he wld not pre-
dictdhow the entire Hose wilt
decide the impeaciment ques-
tion.
Esch went on to blast the pre-
sidential claim of executive pri-
vilege as a reason for the White
House's failure to release all in-
formation concerning the Water-
gate incident.
"It is obvious by ni state-
ment that he himself has abused
the concept of executive priv-
ilege - not to protect the Of-
fice of the President, but to
protect Richard Nixon himself,'
Esch said.
Daily Official Bulletin
Wednesday, August 7
Day Calendar
WUOM: Panel discussion, "Dance-
Crossertilization with the Other
Arta," with Allegra Fuller Snyder,
Mas-ia Shramml.d&Laos-la Ralksn
at 18th Annual Oonventien of
Amer. Dance Gud, 91.7 MHz, 9:45
A-V Ctr.:Not So Solid Earth,
Aud. 3, MLB, 7 la.
Ames. Ase. ato s-CiticalCare
Nuse: ametng, 10410 Main Hosp.,
7 pm.
SIS: intro, lecture, Tsansce-
dental Meditaton, Henderson Rm.,
League, 8 pm.
Moas Se.: Larry Benclich, bans
trombone, Recital Hall; Choir &
Orchestra, Thomas Hilbish, conduc-
or, works by Sach & Beethoven,
Hill Aud.; both at 8 pm.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Vlume LXXXIV, No. 57-
Wednesday, August 7, 974
is edited and managed by stuaents
at the Univesity o Mchgan. Hew
phane 74-062. Scend clas petage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 48106.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday msning dusing the Unive--
sity yearasr420 Maynard Stret, Ann
Arbor. Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);;
$55 local=mail(ichigan and Ohio);
$12 non-oca mail (other staes and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
ocal mail (other states and foreign).
CANOE TRIPS
SKIP'S HURON RIVER
CANOE LIVERY
DELHI PARK ]

TV
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 11 13 News
9 ady Griffith
20 Lease as Ta Beaver _
24 ABC News-Smth/
30 Eye To Eye
50 Avengers
56 Journey to Japan
57 Sesame Street
6:30 4 13 NBC News-Jhn
Chancellor
7 ABC News-Mlt/
teasoner
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
11 CBS News-Walter
Cronkite
20 Nanny and the Professor
24 Dick Van Dye
30 Beak Beat
56 Bayou City
7:00 2 CBS News-Walter
Cronkite
4News
7 To Tell the Truth
9Beverly Hllbllis
I1 To Tell the Truth
13 What's My Line?
20 Rifleman
24 Dealer's Choice
30 Speaking Freely
50 Unouhales
56 Dtroit Black Journal
57 Electric Company
7:30 2 13 Truth or Consequences-
4 24 Sale of she Century
7 ozzie's Girls
9 News
11 Treasure Hunt
20 Rogues
56 Ask the Lawyers
57 Liliaas, Yoga and You
8:00 2 11 Hudson Brothers
4 13 Chase
7 24 The Cowboys
9 Ian Tyson
30 Potpourri
50 Mcale's Navy
56 It's Your Money
57 Day at Night
0:30 7 24 Movie
"The Stranger Who Looks
Like Me."
9 Document
20 Judd for the Defense
30 Ohio This Week
50 Merv Griffin
5 57 Great American
Dream Mahine
9:00 2 11 Cannon
4 13 Movie
"The Healers"
S News
30 Toledo City Council
9:30 9 V.I.P.
20 Seven Hundred Club
5 57Boarding House-
Music
0:00 2 11 Kojak
7 24 Doc Elliot
9 Ameria
50 Plimpton The Man on
he Flying Trapeze
56 Fanfare
57 Festival Films
10:34 57 Video Visionaries
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 24 News
9 CBC News-Lloyd
Robertson
50 Night Gallery
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 11 Movie
"Assignment K". (English;
1968)
4 13 Johnny Carson
7 24 Wide World Special
20 Jimmy Swaggert
50 Movie
"The Breaking Point." (1950)
12:00 9 Movie
"Wild, Wild winter." (1966)
2:0 4 Tomorrow
7 13 Nws
1:30 2 Movie
"The Life of Jack London."
11 News
2:00 4 Shadows on the Wail
2:30 4 News
3:00 2 What's My Line?
3:30 2 News -

THE SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE Presents
FIVE ABREAST GOING ABROAD:
A Celebration of the Women We Are
An Originol Thsetre Piece Created & Assembled by e
Women's Workshop for Both Women and Men
TWO CONSECUTIVE WEEKENDS
AUG. 1, 2, 3 & AUG. 8, 9, 10 (Matinee 2 P.M.)
$1.25 8:00 P.M.
DONATION EAST QUAD AUD.
FOR RESERVATIONS, INFORMATION, GROUP
RATES CALL 763-1 172 DAILY 5-7 P.M.
-ANN ARBOR'S ALTERNATIVE THEATRE-

Around A
The Ann Arbor Sun Commun-
ity Newspaper is holding a
benefit at 9.30 p.m. tonight at
the Blind Pig Cafe, featuring
The Rabbits. Admission is a dol-
lar and all proceeds go to the
Sun for the purpose of moving
to new offices.
TRAFFIC TOLL
SAN FRANCISCO UPI - The
National Automobile Club re-
ports that more than 1.9 million
people died in the United States
as a result of motor vehicle ac-
cidents from 1900 through 1972.

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336 MAYNARD
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Also ... 1000's of RECORDS-Classical, Jazz, Folk x
REDUCED up to 80%
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Secretaries and Clericals
VM-AFSCME
Organizing Committee Meeting
TON IGHT
611 Church St.
CAMPUS ARCADE)
ROOM 2029
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees
THE UNION FOR PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

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