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August 01, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-08-01

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Thursday, August 1, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, August 1, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Pres. would
lose pension
if impeached
WASHINGTON )-President
Nixon would be eligible for the
$60,000 pension paid former
presidents .if he resigned, but
would lose it if he were im
peached and removed from of-
fice, a report of the General
Accounting Office (GAO) indi-
cates.
The report, written in imper-
sonal terms without specific
mention of Nixon, was prepared
at the request of Sen. Philip
Hart (D-Mich.).
"Clearly, if a President is
impeached by the House of Rep-
resentatives, and convicted and
removed from office by the Sen-
ate, he would not be entitled to
receive any of the benefits
granted to former Presidents by
the presidential pension law,"
GAO wrote.
This law provides for former
presidents a pension equivalent
to the salary of a cabinet offi-
cer. Currently, this is $60,s100.
"The legislative history ofa ll
of the pertinent statutes appears
that a President who resigns
from office at any time prior
to a conviction in the Senate,
would be entitled to the prei-
dential pension .
"If a President is impeached
and removed from office, it
would be for the Civil Service
Commission and the courts to
decide what effect, if any, >is
action would have on his civil
service annuity," GAO said.
In addition to the persi)sal
pension, a GAO spokesman said,
an impeached and convicted
President would lose the allow-
ance granted former Presidents
to maintain and staff an ofice,
a sum that could run close to
$100,000 annually.
Secret Service protection for
firmerdpresidents is provided
by a different law which does
not go into the circumstances
under which a President leaves
office, GAO said. It provides
that, at the direction of the Se-
retarv of the Treasury, a for-
mer President and his wife are
entitled to lifetime protection.
Presumably this would apply ti
Nixon even if he were conviced
4 Dems vie
in State
Senate race
Continue irom Page 3)
Each hopeful has said that
candidates for p u b 1 i c office
should open financial records to
the public. They have made
their income tax forms avail-
able for inspection.
To dramatize his stand on
parking meters Moon has dis-
tributed fake tickets on cars
pointing out that such fines are
"unlegislated taxes.' At least
one resident attempted to pay
the ticket, thus bringing the
matter to the attention of city
officials.
The city said Moon's cam-
paign tactic is illegal but that
somebody would have t be
"caught in the act" before ary
arrest could be made.
Faye and Eckstein have both
criticized a bill introduced by
Bursley which would provide

local school districts with sup-
plemental state funding n di-
rect proportion to the size of
their property tax levies for
education,
"The bill does not work at
the bottom of the barrell," Faye
said and added the measure
does not generate more educa-
tional funds but merely "shifts"
the allocation of present monies.
Eckstein said Bursley's bill
would "perpetuate inequality in
the state-wide school system."

Finance laws
ConItinIled from Page 3) detailed reporting, were adopted
cial disclosure laws, notes that in Arizona, Indiana, Maine,
many states have passed such Maryland, Minnesota, Oklaho-
laws since the Watergate story ma, Texas and Wisconsin.
was brought to the public at- States which had pre-Water-
tention. gate laws include Washington,
Since 1973, Common Cause Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia,
says that laws embracing local Hawaii, Illinois, K e n t u c k y,
as well as state officials have New Mexico, New York, Ten-
been adiipted in Alabama, Cali- nessee, Virginia aisd West Vir--
fornia, Arkansas, Florida, Kan- tint.
sas, Ohio and South Dakota. Cooperation i s frequently
grudging and some officials still
NARROWER measures, us- say more such laws may only
ially limited to legislators or reduce the quality of officehold-
state officials or calling for less ers. But the intense interest
Use Dciily.

upset officials
brought to the issue by Water- Rhode Islanid's Dlesuocratic
gate has prompted some politi- (Gov. Philip Noel, also a candi-
cigns to heat their states to the date for re-election, has made
punch. a voluntary disclosure, along
In Massachusetts, l)eniocratic irith his Republican opponent,
Gov. Francis W. Sargent, a
candidate for re-election, has But Nohel is not aniuus to
released his 1973 federal tax Iake the practice manadtadory.
returns as have his leading 'I think that if yis . . . require
Democratic opponents. Carroll people to disclose all of their
Sheehan, the GOP candidate, personal tealth or lack of
says he won't make such a dis- stealth, or whatever the fiasices
closure now but pledges that,
if elected, he'll invite the press ire, that you discourage a lot of
to "pick a CPA" to inspect his gtoid people from running for
records too. office," he says.
MClssifieds

SUNDAY. AUGUST 4 at 7 34 pm MO}NDAY. AUG K at c3 pm
$6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) $6 (pavilion) $4 (lawn)
$ Cromer
*L0L S a- Ipc *PETER YAR ROW

Earth, Wirnd
SIFire

WED. *AUG, 7 at 7 30 pm 3
$6 (pavilon), 4 (elawn)
huh.im

POPULARIDEMAND A SPECIAL FRIDAY PERFORMANCE HAS BEEN ADDED
(THURSDAY CONCERT SOLD OUT)
FRIDAY AUGUST 9
5 pm 17 (pavilion). 5 (lawn)
Joni &itchell
with Tom~cott & the Lt..Expressz

SATURDAY, AUG. 10 at 7 pm SUNDAY, AUG. 11 at 7:30 pm MON. AUG 12 & TUES. AUG 13
$7 (KS0LD aUTvn) $6 (pavilion), $4 (fawn) 7:30 pm $7 (pavilion), $1 lawn)
All tickets from July 14 will be honored CANCELL.ED
& &-AN' Eddie Kendricks
-it now scheduled
STEPHANIE MILLS WA r
Souther, Hillman & Furay
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 14 at 8 pm THURSDAY, AUG. 15 at 8 pmjFR . AUG. 16 & SAT. AUG 17 MONDAY, AUG. 19 at 8:30 pm
$6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) a pm $7 (pavilion). $5 (fawn) $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn)
L060IMSSergioMendes
1bAND & Brasil '77 Iseilgetsa
;UTHQI MCSSIMA MBOS100
DVLOZAR OUTAIN BLOO TO NE
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 THURSDAY, AUGUST 22 FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 at 8 pm
TUESDAY, AUGUST 20 at 7:30 7:30 pm $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) 8 pm $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) $6.50 (pavilion), $4.50 (fawn)
$6.50 (pavilion), $4:50 (lawn)
TWO GENER ATIONS OF
FEATURING
EaglesDAVE BRUBECK
AND
DARIUS BRUBECK ENSEMBLE
WITH
CHRISand DAN BRUBECK
SAT., AUGUST 24 8 p.m. SUNDAY, AUG. 25 at 7:30 pm MON., SEPT. 2 & TUE S., SEPT. 3 WED., SEPT. 4 thru SUN. SEPT. 8
$6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) $6 (pavilion), $4 (lawn) 7:34 p.m. $7 (pavilion), $5 (lawn) 8:30 p.m. (7:30 Sun.)
L AWN SOLD OUT ON SEPT 2 $7 (pavilion), $5 (lawn)
with N IRMACI
stugggg JOSE 9FELICIANO BEdCH
topia & GDON({Soultrain} H 11GRI
CORNELIUS B Y
FRI.. SEPTEMBER 13 7:30 p.m SAT., SEPTEMBER 14 TCESAALBEA
$6.50 (pavilion), $4.50 (lawn) 8 p.m. $6 (pavilion), $4 (fawn) PT no u IC EThAAtr IB ETheteBxOf
(10 am - It pm d.ily) (Mon.-Sat., 9 am - IllPm)
WodaddJh estb~on (Eastland / onderln
CHA MA"enVelope. Make checks payable to Pine Knob Music Theatre.
,Fwrw WWFOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
(313) 647.7790

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