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July 27, 1974 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-07-27

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DA 1LY

Saturday, July 27, 1974

PageTen HE ICHIAN DILYSatudayJul 27,197

Regents hike

(Continued fron Page 3)
faculty members and chaired by
the University vice - president
for student services."
THESE COMPROMISE guide-
lines represent a victory for
student and faculty members
who had charged that guide-
lines proposed by the adminis-
tration and submitted to the
Regents Thursday were unfair.
The proposed administration
guidelines required "all stu-
dent - faculty groups who use
University facilities to hold all
their accounts with the Univer-
sity."
CINEMA GUILD Treasurer
Bill Thompson said he was
"highly pleased' with the com-
promise regulations and that
the new guidelines "de-railed"
chances of administrative sup-
pression of the groups.
Cinema Guild President Pat-
rick Murphy said that argu-
ments presested Thursday to.
the Regents and those given by
representatives of student and
faculty groups opposed to the

administration proposal "made
a very good case for new guide-
lines" and convinced the Re-
gents to pass the compromise
proposal.
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen,
arguing against the administra-
tive proposal on Thursday, had
said the proposed restrictions'
"set-up unfair distinctions be-
tween University and non-Uni-
versity groups . . . these guide-
lines are sure to create a dis-
content that won't soon be ap-
peased."
COHEN, president of the
faculty Senate Assembly Com-
mittee on University Affairs,
said that an "overwhelming"
majority of the faculty were op-
posed to the administration's
proposed restrictions.
In another decision yesterday,
the Regents voted unanimously
to reorgani-e the Medical Cen-
ter. The revamping will break-
up the five-year-old administra-
tion, composed of the Medical
School, the School of Nursing
and the University lospital, into

tuition
three separate bodies.
At present, all three units are
responsible to the director of
the Medical Center. Under the
new set-up, both the Medical
and Nursing School deans will
report directly to the Vice
President for Academic Affairs,
while the hospital will be run by
an administrative board.
IN FURTHER ACTION, the
Regents voted unanimously to
set-up a committee to study the
possibility of creating a College
of Environmental Resources,
Design and Planning.
The College would combine
the present School of Natural
Resources and College of Archi-
tecture and Urban Design into
one unit.
The Regents also voted unani-
mously yesterday to close the
road leading into the University
Arboretum and to allow city
- police to regularly patrol there.
University officials said that
neighbors had complained of ex-
cess noise and unruly behavior
in the Arboretum.

Dem primary candidates
meet to air theirviews

Can you dig it?
God knows it's been a helluva year for trees. This tough old
elm met its fate yesterday afternoon when a bulldozer did the
advance work for another new fast food joint-to fill the
vacant lot at Maynard and Liberty.
Copi, McClary wagce-
sow primiary battle
(Conntied from ra, ;s , 1 veneral disease and pregnancy

(Cntne ro age 3)
atrioval for:,
-impeachment of the presi-
dent;
--cuts in the defense budget;
-legalized abortion; and
-the need for new sources of
energy.
Lansing stressed "this is the
year of the women" saying she
wanted to "point out one differ-
ence among the candidates."
EGNOR emphasized he was
"not at all happy with the slow
pace of the impeachment pro-
ceedings" while Pierce's main
theme was "everybody in the
country should have first class
medical care" and Reuther
stressed economic reforms call-
ing the tax system "unjust."
The State senate hopefuls are:
Cynthia Churchill, Peter Eck-
stein, Gerald Faye, and Har-
old Moon, who did attend last
night's debate.
Campaign reform was one of
the major issues with all con-
testants calling for stricter cam-
paign laws and pointed out how
much they plan to spend in the
primary:
-Churchill "less than $500";
-Eckstein "a little over
$4,000"; and
-Faye "$7,000 to $8,000" add-

ing he Wanted to wage a "full-
scale campaign against Bursley
from the start."
Senate candidates f u r t h e r
stressed the need for better edu-
cational financing, pollution con-
trol, lessening property taxes
by instituting a graduated, in-
come tax, and a laxing in strict
birth control education laws.
In a related late-night event
congressional candidates Lan-
sing, Pierce and Ruether signed
"The 1974 Indochina Peace
Pledge."
Lansing promised "If elected
I will go to Vietnam to liberate
political prisoners" a d d i n g
"those in the 'tiger cages' must
be freed" in reference to cells
in which Vietnamese prisoners
are kept in the south.
Pierce calling President Thieu
of Sooth Vietnam a "son-of-a-
bitch" said he would "not sup-
port the regime in any way"
adding that all troops should be
withdrawn from Korea, Thai-
land, and the Philippines.
Ruether said he did not sup-
port the Thieu government,
wanted to cut military spending
and maintained the U.S. should

withdraw troops from Indochina
adding "we require a presence
there such as an office and
staff."
The group which sponsored
the signing is the Indochina
Peace Campaign. The pledge
calls for an end of "direct U.S.
military involvement in Indo-
china.
Yf-
see
news
happen
coil_
76calY

County Assistant Corporate
Counsel Elliot Striar said "the
Hatch Act probably did apply
to Copi" although no formal
ruling was made due to Copi's
resignation. -
McClary, a student at the
University, while stressing she
is "not interested in handing
over a big budget" plans to "in-
troduce a comprehensive pro-
gram for combating rape" in-
cluding special training of sher-
iffs and expanded public trans-
portation.
On the health care issue, Mc-
Clary says "there is a need to
get more information on what
is available to the people" add-
ing that "few are aware" of
free medical help available. She
also wants to see confidential
Be careful with fire:
There are babes
ihewoods.

testing for minors.
Pointing out that federal
funding of Legal Aid is in dan-
ger, Copi says he would like
to see the county takeover Legal
Aid's $100,000 budget if the
government grant is lost.
Copi also says that "there is
a need for candidates to get out
and meet the people" in refer-
ence to McClary's absence from
the district.

Ckwrcle eni-c-

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room - 306 E.,Lib-
erty. 10-9 Mon., t-S Toes-Sat.
"The Truth That Heals" -
WPAG radio, 10 a.m. Sunday.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Howard.F, Gebhart
10 a.m.-Worship Service and
Church School.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
10:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist
and Sermon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders,
John R. Waser, Brewster H.
Gere, Jr.
"Where Christ, Campus and
Community meet"
9:30 a.m. - Worship Service.
Sermon Title: "W h e r e Are
You?"

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Holy Eucharist at noon at
Canterbury House.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
01S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Donald G. Zill, pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:15 a.m.
* * 4
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Court
(1 Block S. of C.C. Little Bldg.)
The Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m. - Sermon: Hosea
11-14: "Evergreens."
6:00 p.m. - Discussion. Ron
Spoelman will lead a discussion
on how to answer a hospitalized
person who asks, "Why does
God allow this to happen to
me?"
** *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.

89.5 FM W
WCBN wC N
DEBATE
PERRY BULLARD
AND
LIZ TAYLOR
candidates for the Democratic
nominations to State of Representatives
CALL IN-763-3500
Sunday, July 28 10ld p.mn.

I

THE SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE presents
georg buchner's social drama
This Weekend : Thur.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun.
JU LY 25-26:-27-28
$1.25 EAST QUAD AUD.
donation 8:00 p.m.
Call 763-1172 daily for
information, reservations, group rates
-ANN ARBOR'S ALTERNATIVE THEATRE-

t .OM**014o 4PbSO

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