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July 27, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Nixon to meet court
deadline on tapes

SAN CLEMENTE. Calif. P-
White House sources said yes-
terday that there would be "no
problem" with the court time-
table worked out for tornover of
Watergate tapes. But they indi-
cated President Nixon would
not move to make this evidence
immediately available to the
House Judiciary Committee.
Deputy Press Secretary Ger-
ald Warren said the White
House was operating under in-
structions from Judge John Sir-
ica's court to turn over 64 re-
quested tapes and documents on
a newly worked out timetable
that calls for turnover of 20
W a t e r g a t e conversations
by next Tuesday.
THE JUDGE'S order yester-
day to Nixon's defense lawyer,
James St. Clair, was being sent
by telecopier to the President
at the Western White House
where, Warren said, Nixon
"will review it."
"Then, we will proceed from
there," Warren said.
The Supreme Court ordered
the President to turn over the
tapes and documents subpoena-
ed by special prosecutor Leon
Jaworski for use in a Watergate
cover-up trial. They also had
been subpoenaed by the House

Judiciary Committee for its im-
peachment inquiry.
W HEN ASKED IF
Nixon would turn over the evi-
dence to the committee, War-
ren said the President was op-
erating under instructions re-
latine to the court case. He de-
clined to answer specifically a
direct question about the turn-
over, replying, "We think the
committee should proceed with
its work.
"The information suggested
as possible evidence in a court
matter" was being processed
under the court order, he added.
President Nixon was describ-
ed as feeling fine and his mood
was said to be "confident" as
the impeachment vote of the
committee approached.
Warren repeated the White
House position: "We believe the
House will not vote out a bill
of impeachment," a reference
to the full House of Represen-
tatives that would act after a
Judiciary Committee vote call-
ing for impeachment.
The cash register was invent-
ed by James Ritty, an 0 h i o
saloon keeper, to keep his bar-
tenders honest.

APihoto
Smoke on the wafer
A 125-foot dredge burned for nearly four hours in Tampa Bay yesterday before it finally sunk.
The dredge sank outside the shipping channel. There were reported injuries. Officials however
expressed concern over a possible oil spill.

Cyprus fighting continues
despite ceasefire treaty

Becaref uiwith fire.
Remieniber: there are babes
the woods.
And those baby fawns, rabbits, Follow all the rules of safety and
squirrels'and trees need a safe, happy caution-just like any other place where
home. They need a place where they can here are children at play.
grow up strong and healthy.
Like babes everywhere.
So, please, be careful with fire when
you're in the forest.
7:-i

By The Associated Press
The president of Cyprus ac-
cused Turkish troops yesterday
of cease-fire violations and said
that "time is running out" on
his island's shaky cease-fire. In
Geneva, Greece and Turkey
held their second day of peace
talks and charged each other
with ignoring the truce.
Cypriot President Glafeos
Clerides said he could no long-
er restrain his Greek Cypriot
troops from fighting against the
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INSTRUCTION is given in
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For further information and
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Turkish advances. He said he
would like "brotherhood" with
Turkish Cypriots, but that if
the Greek Cypriots start fight-
ing Turkish troops the conse-
quences also "would be borne
to a great extent by the Turkish
Cypriots."
"IT WILL RE with the great-
est reluctance that I will ap-
rear before the Gr'ek people
of Cvnrus and in-ite them to
fight to the last man and to the
end." he said.
At the United Nations. Cypriot
Ambassador Zenon Rossides re-
norted in a letter to the Security
Council a "grave deterioration
of the situation in Cyprus
through the continued and fla-
grant violation of the cease-
fire by Turkey."
Cyprus initially called for a
Friday night meeting of the
Security Council, but later
agreed to a postponement until
Saturday to await developments
at the Geneva peace talks.
THE TURKISH National Se-
curity Council issued a state-
ment after a meeting in Ankara
calling on the government there
to take "all necessary meas-
ures" to protect the Turkish
community on Cyprus in the
event of prolonged peace talks
in Geneva.

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