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July 26, 1974 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-07-26

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Fans knew the answer
to '28 Tigers woes

(Editor's Note: The follow-
ing story is a reprint cour-
tesy of the Detroit News. It
was published May 30, 1928.
The Daily Sports Staff thinks
you will enjoy it, particularly
in light of the Tigers' misfor-
tunes this summer.)
What is the matter with the
Tigers?
Detroit's base ball club, her-
aided this spring with brave
fanfares of praise, began losing
from the very start and now
is floundering about the lower
reaches of the second division.
The fans of Detroit are ask-
ing questions. What's the trou-
ble? Is it the manager? The
hitting? The fielding? The
pitching? I there dissension in
the ranks? Is the management
doing all it can to build up the
team?
Yesterday, reporters from
The Detroit News as they
went about their daily tasks,
took up the question and asked
it of those with whom they
came in contact during the
day:
"WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH
THE TIGERS?"
Here are some of the ans-
wers:
THOMAS LOGAN, Book-Cad-
illac Hotel - The trouble with
the Tigers is they are tripping
on their tail. The spirit of co-
operation seems to be lacking
and no team can win that hasn't
the spirit.
JOSEPH H. CREEDON, sec-
retary, Detroit Lodge of Elks-
The Tigers are warm weather
players. I believe hot weather
would make them a winning
team. The organization, from
Moriarty down, is good enough
to win any ball game, but the
Tigers never have been known
to win in cool weather.
RAY C. BANE, oil station op-
erator, 13541 Third avenue - It
must be caused by prohibition.
We blame everything else that
goes topsy-turvy on the Eigh-
teenth Amendment, so why not
this?
DR. FRANK B. BRODER-
ICK - If I were to tell what I
thought was the matter with the
Tigers, my dog would bite me.
DETECTIVE LIEUT.
GEORGE LUDWIG - M o r e
people are patronizing the City
recreation parks every year to
watch amateur ball games be-
cause they can see more real
ball playing there than at Navin
Field.
RAY DOHERTY - probation
officer - I think George Mor-
iarty is the best manager De-

troit has had or ever will have.
The present losing streak is
due principally to the long list
of injuries which the team has,
sustained.
MAYOR JOHN C. LODGE -
Compare the team with Hughey
Jennings' pennant- winning ag-
gregation of 1907. George Mor-
iarty is much like Jennings in
his knowledge of base ball, en-
thusiasm and disappointment at
reverses. Jennings had probab-
ly the worst pennant-winning
team on peper in the history of
baseball, with the exception of
the 1914 Boston Braves. He had
a perfectly awful infield, a bet-
ter than ordinary outfield, fair
catchers but an extraordinary
battery. It was a team of great
spirit. Take Charley Schmidt,
the great catcher. With a brok-
en finger, he ran to Doc Keane
and said: "Here, Doc, put a
few splints on this," and he
roared loudly when he was tak-
en out of the game. That was
the spirit that actuated every
man. The Tigers of 1928 have
had the jinx on their trail since
the season opened and in addi-
tion it is a team built around
the batting ability of one man,
Harry Heilmann. The attitude
seems to be: "He's not hitting,
so what's the use?" I know of
no hpyodermic injection which
will infuse a base ball team
overnight with the ability, the
spirit and the will to win.
JOSEPH O. CASTELLUCCI,
assistant prosecuting attorney-
That the Detroit Tigers are not
a winning ball club is due al-
most entirely to the close rein
Navin keeps on the purse
strings.
JOSEPH GUYETTE, Federal
Court baliff, a base ball fan for
50 years - The Tigers are all
right. They need to be pepped
up by their rooters, that's all.
I remember, years ago, when
the Boston team went bad on
tour and lost 20 straight games.
The Boston rooters got together,
organized a rooters' club and
gave the team a rousing wel-
come when it got back to the
home grounds. The faith of the
rooters brought the team to-
gether and it won games with
ease after that.
JUDGE GUY A. MILLER, of
the Circuit Court - There is
so much wrong with the Tigers
that I don't know where to be-
gin. Heilmann and Fothergill
are the two slowest outfielders
in either league. As fielders,
they are through. They are good
hitters but do not come within
30 per cent of covering the
ground they should. The man-

agement must get down to bed
rock and build the team from
the ground up.
J. HENRY PICKLER, Hotel
Statler - Pitchers are the heart
of a base ball team, and the
heart of the Tigers seems to
be suffering from valvular dis-
ease.
MATTHEW M. GOEBEL,
grand knight, Gabriel Richard
Council, Knights of Columbus-
It seems to me there is plenty
of good material but absolutely
no co - operation between the
managers and the players.
Moriarty never should have
been chosen manager.
LIEUT. CLARENCE WHITE,
Highland Park police - The
Tigers need pitchers. They don't
have good relief pitchers. We
need one like old "Hook"
Dauss, who could be depended
on always to pull a game out of
the fire.
PATROLMAN A R T H U R
HEIDT - What Detroit needs
is a National League team,
which would cause the owners
of the Tigers to spend money
for good players so they could
compete for patronage.
JOSEPH DOBROWOLNY,
letter carrier - Detroit once
was noted for its heavy hitting,
but not now. Easterling made
four hits one day and was taken
out the next day. I don't think
he has been in the game since.
Let's have some new blood and
let the old players worry about
their jobs for a while.
DR. AUSTIN HOWARD, Re-
ceiving Hospital - Navin will
not spend the money for talent.
Pitchers are needed. As for the
rest of the team, they released
two of their best players in Ma-
nush and Blue.
GENEVIEVE KENNEDY-
The Tigers need the moral sup-
port of the women fans of De-
troit. I'll wager that a crowd
of young women rooters at the
ball park would make the Tig-
ers play real ball.
R. C. SHEPHERD, recruiting
officer, United States Coast
Guard - The Tigers are one of
the finest teams in the league.
No team can work well with a
lot of its members on the sick
list and old Lady Luck giving it
the absent treatment.

l'ish gridders suspended
for violating school rules
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (A) -- he said.
Six Notre Dame football play- The dismissed students were
ers including the heart of the identified by an Irish teammate
Irish defense, have been sus- as Luther Bradley, Muncie,
pended from school for at least Ind.; Russ Browner, Warren,
a year for violating school Ohio; Al Hunter, Greenville,
rules, The Associated Press N. C.; Willie Fry, Memphis,
learned yesterday. Tenn.; Roy Henry, New Or-
The South Bend Tribune said leans, and Dan Knott, Crow-
in its Thursday editions that chilla, Calif. At least two news-
the case involved a complaint papers carried the same identi-
filed by an 18-year-old woman, fications.
who alleged she had been The university, in a short
raped. A prosecutor said six statement, said the "serious
Notre Dame football players violation of university rules"
were under investigation in a which prompted the dismissals
rape allegation. No charges was not a criminal matter.
have been filed. But Ken Fedder, chief deputy
Notre Dame acknowledged prosecutor for St. Joseph Coun-
that a "small number of stu- ty, which includes South Bend,
dents" had been dismissed, but confirmed that a criminal in-
it would not say how many vestigation was being con-
there were and would not iden- ducted by his office against six
tify them as football players. football players, but he de-
However, A r a Parseghian, lined to say who they were.
coach of the national champion "I can't say if criminal
Irish, conceded in a telephone charges will be filed or not," he
interview that all were mem- said. "There's no reason to be-
bers of his team. lieve that charges won't be
"It's a great disappointment, filed, but it may depend on the
one of those things that happen, university's handling of the
and we'll just have to set it be- matter,"
hind us,' Parseghian told the Bradley, a defensive half-
AP. Parseghian said he would back, led last year's squad in
not become involved in the mat- interceptions. Browner, an end,
ter. topped the front four in tackles.
"As far as I'm concerned it Both were starters last season
was a university irregularity, and were members of the Irish
and a university suspension," track team.
THE
a new improvised musical revue. - - -
conceived & directed by
ALLAN ALBERT
managing director
DREW'SPARKS
starring the cast of
BOSTON'S longest
running5show-
THE PROPOSITION
June 6 - august 10
THE RUI3AIyAT
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wednesdays & thursdays -9:30
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ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE is
accepting resumes for set, cos-
tume, and lighting designers for
the 1974-75 season. Please submit
in writing by August 6 to Alida
Silverman, 2683 Esch, AA; or call
971-3513.

if
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LAHELU
diSOU1
THESOUTH
1235 UNIVERSITY 300 S. STATE
313-668-9866 313-665-3679
MON-FRI: 9:30-9
SATt 9:30-6
SUN: 12-+6
the music people

TONIGHT!
Michigan Repertory '74
presenting
Shakespeare's comedy
THE TAMING
OF THE SHREW
POWER CENTER-8:00 P.M.
x'63-3333
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT NOON
TOMORROW: William Inge's PICNIC

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