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July 16, 1974 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-07-16

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Tuesday, July 16, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page ee

11 BENGAL VETS REPORT
Football strike at impasse

By The Asociated Pren
The first crack - more like a
fissure, actually - has appear-
ed in the wall of striking Na-
tional Football League veterans.
A break may be imminent, too,
in the deadlocked contract 'alks.-
While most NFL teams had
to be content with perhaps one
or two veterans appearing at
camp along with the usual flood
of rookies and free agents, the
Cincinnati Bengals enjoyed a
windfall when a dozen vets, in-
:luding quarterback Grog Cook,
tight end Bob Trumpy ant line-
backer Al Beauchamp, showed
up Sunday at Wilmington, Ohio.
Yesterday, though, Cook re-
versed his field and walked out
of camp, leaving the Bengals
with 11 veterans. It still was the
largest contingent of non-str k-
ers, and Beauchamp thinks
more may be on the way.
"I think a lot of the Sayv are
behind the strike because thwy
only want two weeks of prac-
tice and don't want to play as
many exhibition games, he
said.
"CINCINNATI is our Na1
competition," Pittsbgh vc
president Din Roonev obseved
from the Steelers' Latrabe, 'Pa.,
camp, "and since some rf their
veterans are showing up, maybe
some of our guys will consid:
this and decide to report."
Preston Pearson, hi Steelers'
player representative, adotted
he was surnrised at th EBengals'
defection.
"I didn't think ther'd be 12
guys in the entire leag e who
would cross the picket ies,"
he said.
IN HOUSTON, meantime, Bill
Curry, president of the NFL
Players Association, said hli te-
lieves "both sides now :i r e
ready to sit down and 'Isdotns
the issues . . . I think we would
be foolish if we couldn't s it
down and settle this before the
regnlar season starts."
Then, for the first time sne
the strike began July 1 Cur ry
mentioned what might be con-
sidered a timetable.
"If we can't reach in agree-
ment in six to eight weeks,
there's something seriously
wrong," Curry said, adding he
would have his negotiating team
"on a 24-hour call to sart talk-
ing.
Cook's walkout appeared to
be the result of his own prob-
lems, rather than because of
the strike.
THE ONLY other camp with
more than a trickle of vets on
hand belonged to the Houston
Oilers, with 10, including lne-
backers Steve Kiner, Gregg
Bingham and Ted Washington.
At Carlisle, Pa., the Washing-
ton Redskins' camp, Roy Jef-
ferson and Brig Owens met with
rookies and tried to convince
them not toplay any exhibition
games, including a rookie scitl-O
mage Friday night, which the
Redskin vets plan to- picket.
"The fact that the game is
scheduled to RFK Stadium the
team's Washington, D.C., home
and that they're charging mon-
ey for tickets tells me the tame
is an exhibition game," s a i d
Jefferson. "If we can ssp this

game, it might set a precedent
so other teams won't have them
until this thing is settled."
TOM ORIGER, owner of the
World Football League's C h i-
cago Fire, said yesterday he
thinks the WFL may realize
some short-term gains from the
strike but the walkout could
hurt both leagues in the lng
run.
"The strike could help our
league if it lasts bevond the
NFL's exhibition season, bt I
still hate to see it going in-
it's bad for the game gier-
ally," Origer said.
"I suppose there would be a
small benefit for "s if the IFL
tried to tackle the regular sea-
son without veterans, bt the
pnhlic may resent a ar ilsowed
strike and that would hirt all of
or- football.
"It would be kind of int:-est-
ing to se what wrd ha-nen,
tha,'igh, if the NFL tried to play
th reenIr season with v h a t
nilavers thev've got now, ' Ori-
eer said.
RSEwHtRE arond the
NFL., none of Green Bay's vet-
erans walked throneh the nicke
line when the Parkers' camp
snened sn. And Coach D a n
Deine s',eeested, as Philadel-
ohia Eagles' Coah Mike Mc-
Cormack had over the weekend,
that he'd rather see no veterans
'rossing the line than fast a
few.
"For 26 years, I've been a
fanatic on team unity," Devine
said. "This is the heart of my
coachine nhilosonhv."
At Vero Beach, Fla., quarter-
back Archie Manning led a pick-
et line when New Orleans open-
ed its camp to rookies and free
agents. None of the veterans
crossed that line, either. There
were no veterans on hand when
the Chicago Bears' and Phil-
adelphia Eagles' camps opened.
THE ONLY veteran who fail-
ed to honor the New York
Giants' nicket line when camp
opened Sunday was Honor Jack-
son, a defensive back. Defen-
sive end Wilbur Young was the
only Kansas City veteran at the
Chief's camp.
Wide receiver Gloster.Rich-
ardson was the only veteran to
cross the Cleveland Browns'
picket line. Linebacker Larry
Stallings did the same at t a e
St. Louis Cardinals' camp. And
offensive tackle Ralph Neely
was the only significant veteran
at the Dallas Cowboys' camp.
Linebacker Brian McConnell,
one of six veterans who show-
ed up at the New England Pa-
triots' camp Saturday, walked
out Monday on the advice of
his lawyer, saying he feared
disciplinary action from t h e
Players Association.
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASEl
DASCOLA
BARBERS
ARORLAND-97 1-9975I
MAPLEVLLAGE-761-27 3
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY- 62-0354

NOTED quarterback Archie
Manning takes his turn on the
picket lines as the NFL play-
er's strike reached New Or-
leans yesterday.
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
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SNOOKER
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demolish the
summer blahs
2 sets-9& 11
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