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July 13, 1974 - Image 11

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Michigan Daily, 1974-07-13

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Saturday, July 131 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Saturday, July 1371974 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Eleven

Sports of The Daily Player leads Open
___ LENO E

Tiger Horton shelved
DETROIT - Detroit Tiger outfielder Willie Horton will enter
a hospital here today for treatment on a knee injury that has
handicapped him for nearly two months.
Horton, 30, who ruptured cartilage in his knee when he col-
lided with the grandstand wall at Tiger Stadium in May, will be
placed on the disabled list for a minimum of 15 days, team Gen-
eral Manager Jim Campbell said.-
Doctors said Horton's knee -would be placed in a cast
for about a week. Further tests will then be made to deter-
mine whether he will need surgery, they said.
Since May, Horton has been able to start only 10 of 27 Tiger
games. He will be replaced on the Tiger roster by outfielder Jim
Nettles, 26, bought from Evansville of the American Association.
Nettles will join the Tigers in Kansas City for this weekend's
series, Campbell said. The brother of New York Yankee third
baseman Graig Nettles, he bit .285 with 47 runs, 11 homers and
47 RBIs in 75 games with Evansville.
F. Robby hanging on
NEW YORK - California's Frank Robinson has a slight edge
on three other outfielders for the No. 3 spot in the starting line-
up for the American League in the July 23 All-Star Game, but
the ballots are still being counted.
Robinson, with 764,893 votes, trails Reggie Jackson and Bob-
by Murcer, but with the results of voting by baseball fans across
the country still incomplete, Detroit's Al Kaline, Oakland's Joe
Rudi and Texas' Jeff Burroughs can't be counted out.
Kaline has 757,448 votes, Rudi 726,603 and Burroughs 696,426,
the commissioner's office announced yesterday.
Jackson, the A's slugging outfielder, ran away with over-
all honors in the AL balloting with 2,085,192 votes, the first
player to surpass the two-million mark. New York's Murcer
is second In the outfield race with 833,783.
So far 4,223,484 ballots have been counted in the voting
which ended Sunday. Final results for the annual rivalry, which
will be held this year at Pittsburgh's Three Rivers' Stadium, will
be announced Monday, Kuhn said.
Boston's Carlton Fisk, hobbled by a knee injury, leads
the catchers with 972,816 votes, followed by New York's Thur-
man Munson with 666,451,
Other leaders in the voting, which has not been dominated
by any one team, are Dick Allen of Chicago, first base, 937,511;
Rod Carew of Minnesota, second base, 1,608,892; Brooks Robinson
of Baltimore, third base, 940,006, and Bert Campaneris of the
A's, shortstop, 1,375,010.
Wilkes a Warrior
OAKLAND - The Golden State Warriors announced yester-
day the signing of All-America UCLA forward Keith Wilkes to a
multi-year contract with the National Basketball Association
team.
General Manager Dick Vertlieb refused to discuss the con-
tract's financial terms. "It's a good offer, and I am happy
about it," Wilkes said at a news conference.
Wilkes, 21, is a native of nearby Berkeley and played three
years with UCLA. He was overshadowed on the Bruins, who won
two NCAA titles, by center Bill Walton, drafted and signed by
the NBA's Portland Trail Blazers.
"I'm kind of looking forward to playing against Walton in
the NBA," Wilkes said.
One scab
LIBERTY, Mo . - Wilbur RENTALS
Young was the only regular
who checked into the Kansas STEREOS TVs
City Chiefs training camp on the AIR CONDITIONERS
William Jewell College campus
by yesterday evening's dead- quaorenteed repoir
line, according to a team service done right
spokesman. in our shop
Young, a starting defensive
end last season, walked with Hi Fi Studio
the picketing veterans outside
the campus during the after- 215 S. ASHLEY
noon, but entered the camp 668-7942 769-0342
when the deadline arrived.
THE SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE presents
JEAN GENET'S
-TO-IE MAWSI,0
July 11, 12, 13 at 8:00 p.m.
East Quad Auditorium
$1.25 DONATION-LIMITED SEATING
-ANN ARBOR'S ALTERNATIVE THEATRE-

as Nicklaus charges

LYTHAM ST. ANNE'S, Eng-
land (') - Gary Player's sear-
ing sub-par pace cooled yester-
day, and the dour little South
African looked over his should-
er to see the advancing shadow
of Jack Nicklaus with one round
to play in the British Open Golf
Championship.
"Sure, I'm uncomfortable, I'm
very nervous," he said after
seeing his five-stroke lead chop-
ped to three by England's Peter
Olosterhuis and - the awesome
Nicklaus coming from nine back
to within four of the top.
Jack is free-wheeling and
I'm choking. Any man who
says he doesn't choke is a liar.
Saturday will be one hell of a
day."
After brilliant sub-par rounds
of 69 and 68, Player's blades
proved they were subject to hu-
man frailty and he had to be
satisfied with a 75 for a 54-hole
score of 212.
His chagrin at this falldown
was heightened when he left a
bll in a bunker at the 162-vard
ninth hole and wound up with a
doasble bogey five.
"In 10 years of tournament
golf I don't remember blading
the ball as I did then," he said.
"I hit it like a duffer."
Player is rated the finest sand
player in the world.
While the part-time Johannes-
burg rancher was encountering
his problems, the 6-foot4 Oos-
terhuis was shooting a fine 73
to put him in second place at
215 and Nicklaus was charging
out of the pack with a one-under
par 70 for 216.
"I thought I was going to
have my Saturday round on
Friday," the golden-haired
Nicklaus, winner of a record

14 major championships, said.
"I had it made up and then
I gave it back."
Sailing toward a possible 66
or 67, big Jack encountered a
thick growth of willow scrub on
the 15th hole, pitched the ball
in a bunker and failed to get out
on his first try, winding up with
a double bogey six. He lost ano-
ther shot at the 16th, chipping
poorly, but salvaged a birdie
on the 17th to break par for the,
first time.
"I am fortunate to be this
close," Nicklaus said. "Certain-
ly, anything is on from here."
Nicklaus is renowned here for
last-day rallies, having shot
rounds of 66 and 6S on the final
days the last two years.

Hubert Green of Birming-
ham, Ala., second leading mon-
ey winner on the U.S. Tour,
shot a 72 for 217 and. moved
into fourth place just behind
Nicklaus and ahead of defend-
ing chomnion Tom Weiskopf
of Columbus, Ohio, and Bobby
Cole of South Africa, tied at
218.
Weiskopf had an erratic put-
ting round with 36 putts and
wvent over par on his jinx bole
-the 445-vard 14th - for the
third straight day in shooting a
74. Young Cole, a copper-hair-
ed copy of Player, caught up
with his more illvstrous coun-
tryman midway of the round but
faded to a 75.

Major League Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Player Club G ABR H Pet. Player ('ub G AB R Pet.
Carew Min 3 332 50 128 .336 Garr Atl 87 365 30 133 .364
Maddox NY e5 194 37 64 .330 Gross Mtn 2 2 283 42 95 .336
Hargrove Tex 6 204 27 67 .328 f-Smith StL 75 262 39027 .332
Ystrzmski na 83 227 52 94 .322 D.Cash, Phi 5350 312I2.320
R.Jackson Oak 75 257 47 84 .327 Schmidt Phi 55 282 51 90 .319
Randle Tex 59 262 32 15 .324 Geronimo Cin 74 201 32 64 .312
Orta Chi 66 229 37 74 .323 Zisk Pgh 76 260 40 54 .316
Stanton Cal 56 298 26 67 .322 Grubb SD 86256 33 90 .313
lLRobinson Hal 51 295 23 95 .322 BucknerLA 70 303 39 94 .310
Braun Min 73 255 50 51 .313 Garvey LA 87 358 53 111 .310
Home Runs Home Runs
0. Alien, Chicago, 22; Mayberry, Cedeno, ouston, 19; wynn, Los
Kansas City, 17; Hendrick, Cleve- Angerls, 19: Schmidt, Philadelphia,
laad, 16; It. Jackson, Oakland, 16; 18; Bench, Cincinnati, 16; T. Perez,
w. Morton, Detroit, 15; Briggs, Mil- Cincinnati, I5; Garvey, Los Angeles,
waukee, 15. 15.
Runs Hatted Sn Runs B~atted Sn
Burroughs, Texas, 70; 0. Allen, Cedeno, Houston, 70; Garvey, Los
Chicago, 69; Rudi, Oakland, 59; Angeles, 65; Schmidt, Philadelphia,
Briggs, Milwaukee, SS; R. Jackson, 62; Cey, Los Angeles, 61; wynn, Los
Oakland, 53. Angeles, 61.
Pitching (7 Decisions) Pitching (7 Decisions)
G. Perry, Cleveland, 15-2, .892; John, Los Angeles, 13-2, .167;
Sprague, Milwaukee, 6-1, .857; Fin- Messsrsmth, Los Angeles, 9-2, .81;
gers, Oakland, 7-2, .778; EdRdgez, Griffin, Houston, 10-3, .769; Me-
Milwaukee, 6-2, .750; Corbin, Minne- Glothen, St. Louis, 12-4, .750; Cap-
sota, 5-2, .714; Hamilton, Oakland, ra, Atlanta, 9-3, .750; Mough, Los
5-2, .714; Cuellar, Baltimore, 11-5, Angeles, 6-2, .750; hardy, san Diego,
.689; Ftzmorris, Kansas City, 6-3. 6-2, .750.

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4th Annual Ann Arbor
E0strI '/A L
ON
MINI S'REfl
July 17-20-10 a.m.-10 p.m.

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LIVE IN AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY
DURING THE SUMMER TERM
FAMILY APARTMENT AVAILABLE
* SPACES IN 2-4 PERSON APARTMENTS
-modern oportments
-community prooroms, sports events, films, dinners
-reosonable rotes
CALL THE
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
9211 CHURCH8 ST., 662-5529

MAIN ST REET AS IT WAS AROUND 1900
FEATURING:
2 50 ARTISANS
Including; Special demonstrations of arts and crafts techniques; Raku and Stoneware
Pottery; Watercolor; Sculpture; Drawings; Painting; Leathercraft; Jewelry, Photog-
raphy; Weaving; Wood carving; AND MORE!
* ENTERTAINMENT &
Including; Mountain Music, by Sherry and John, Wed. 6 and 7 p.m.; Jazz entertain-
ment, by Ron Brooks of the Del Rio, 8-10 p.m. every night; The Extension: Special
Extension Circus for children, 3-3:30 Sat.; Gemini, Wed. 4 p.m. Th-Fri. 6 p.m.;
Rachel, Folk singer, Wed. 5 p.m., Th. 7 p.m., Fri. 2 p.m., Sat. to be announced; David
Bernstein, sneak previews of the medieval festival; Your Heritage House Puppeteers,
3 p.m. Wed.-Fri.; Michael the Mime, Wed.-Th. 1 p.m.; Percy Danforth, Rhythm and
bones, to be announced; Ann Arbor Squares, square dancing, participatory; AND
MOREl
GOURMET REFRESHMENTS *

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