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July 11, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-07-11

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Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Nixon denies authorization
of Ellsberg file break-in

ACITY bicycling enthusiast guards his expensive tea speed from theft by locking it securely- to the rack. ,As an added
precaution, local bicycle experts also recommended registering all bikes with the city.
A pedal pushers primer
on preventng bike theft

WASHINGTON 1'-President Nixon,
in written statements, said under oath
yesterday he did not authorize the break
in to obtain psychological information
about the man who leaked the Pentagon
Papers.
In statements read by the judge to the
plumbers trial jory, Nixon said he cre-
ated a special investigative unit at the
White Itouse to ltg tleaks of vital na-
tional security materiatl liut he denied
authorieing a break-in comiitted by
members of the tail knosvn as the
plumbers at the oftice of pss chiatrist
Leewis Fielding
NIXON'S COMA 'ENT iI sor ans-
wers to written oiterrogatories setnt to
hir bs the coort Tuesday night, t'it a
dramatic climax on the two-week-otd
trial of fontr pslaubet x defendants, inclad
ing Johtnit tmtticuia. Nixon's nn tiule
chief douestic ad iser.
The defense hal rested a hart time
eailier after liearing Secretary ofM State
lenrs Kissinger testify that tie did sut
otder or request a psychological profile
of Daniel Ellsberg, tto lesked the Pen
tagon Papers to the press and wtiho had
been treated by Fietling at the doctor'
Ieverly Ilills, Calif. office.
The plumbers planned and carried Out
the Sept. 3, 1971, break-in at Fielding's
office in an unsuccessful search for
Ellsberg's psychiatric records. Ehrlich-
man is accused of conspiring to violate
Fielding's civil rights through approval
of the entry. 'le also faces four counts
of lying to the FBI and a grand jury.
The other on trial, G. Gordon Liddy,
Bernard Barker and Eugenio Martinez,
are charged in the conspiracy count.
NIXON SAID in response to question-
ing that he first leatrned of the Fielding
break-in on MarchiX17, 1971, the dlay Ehr-
lichinan testifieid he tiild Nixon of it.
That wais a year and a half after the
break-in.
'The specitilunail was created, said Nix-
on, 'to prevent and halt leaks of vital
security information, and to prepare an
accurate history of certain critical na-
tional security matters which occurred
under prior administrations.
"I instructed John Ehrlichman to ex-
ercise general supervisory control over
the Special Investigations Unit," Nixon
said.
WILLIAM FRATES, Eftrlichman's
chief lawyer, asked Kissinger only one
question: whether prior to Aug. 12, 1971
he had authorized David Young, his for-
mer deputy on the national security
council and leader of the plumber unit
to request the CIA to draw tip a psycho-
logical profile of Ellsberg.
"I did not," Kissinger replied.
Philip Bakes, an assistant Watergate
special prosecutor, had two questions on
crossexamination.
See PlUMBERS, Page 8

By BARBARA CORNELL
If you are one of those people who
lie awake nights figuring out foolproof
methods to keep your shiny new 10
speed bike from being stolen, Ann Arbor
Crime Prevention Officer Al Padilla's
advice to you is simply, "Don't buy
one."
This somewhat sardonic advice of
course does you absolutely no good if
you have already bought yourself a bike,
Rep ort clms
Nixon bought
earrings with
campaign funds
WASHINGTON (MP - President Nixon
used $4,562.38 left over from his 19611
campaign to buy his wife a pair of dia-
mond earrings for her 60th birthday, the
staff of the Senate Watergate committee
said yesterday.
The money was held in secret accounts
in the Key Biscayne, FI. bank of C. S.
'Babe" Rebozo, the President's closest
friend, the report said.
IT WAS USED to buy the platinum-set
earrings from New York City jeweler
Barry Winston after being funnelled
through a series of bank accounts, ap-
parently to conceal. its origin in the
Nixo-" campaign, the report to senators
said.
The earrings, containing 16 pear-shaped
diamonds on top -and two pear shaped
and two tapered baguette diamonds be-
low, were picked up and delivered to
the White House by a Navy Lieutenant
Commander on March 17, 1972, Pat Nix-
on's 60th birthday, according to the
report,'
See REPORT, Page 9 :

so Padilla offers a few more helpful sug-
gestions.
FIRST, HE SAYS, "It may sound sim-
ple but keep your bike locked. Many
bikes are stolen because of careless-
ness." He adds that bike owners should
make sure their locks are not touching
the ground. "If the lock is touching the
ground, it gives leverage for the lock
cutters."
He also suggests that a department
or hardware store is not the place to
buy a lock. "Go to a bike store and get
their advice,"
Andy Overmire, an employe at Ann
Arbor Cyclery asserts that even the ex-
perts disagree about lock quality. Al-
though he claims that all locks except
for a few can be cut, it is still important
to get a good lock.
According to Overmire, chain locks
are his preference since they require
larger bolt cutters that big chains can
damage. He says cables can be cut
easily and with less conspicuous cutters
but adds that people tend to prefer cable
locks because they are lighter and easier
to carry.
SINCE 10 speeds are the main target
of bike thieves, Overmire, a 10 speed
owner, says he never locks his bike, but
takes it with him wherever he goes. He
says, "If you are going in a store for a
few minutes, just take the bike with
you."
He noted that he has learned never to
ask permission about taking his bike in
a store because the answer is usually no,
but says he adds he usually has no prob-
lems when he just walks in with it for
a few minutes.
Both Overmire and Padilla caution
that if you choose to park your bike,
where you park it can be a major deter-
minant of whether it will still be there
when you return.
MOST BIKE thefts take place during
the day so Overmire suggests that in-
stead of hiding a bike from view, bike
owners should park them in a place
where a lot of people circulate. Never-
theless, he says it is a very poor idea
to park a bike on'the Diag because of
the high incidence of theft in the area.

But if it is any consolation, Padilla
says the police bike recovery rate is im-
pressive. He says most of the thefts are
local so stolen bikes remain in the Ann
Arbor area.
OVERMIRE and Padilla both agree
that is is a good idea to get a city bike
license which can be purchased at city
hall for 150 cents.
Chief Assistant City Attorney Bruce
Laidlaw says that many of the bikes in
the city are not registered because peo-
ple do not take the time to do it.
LAIDLAW SAYS that City Council is
considering a proposal that he claims
will aid stolen, bike retrieval as well as
be a deterrent against theft. He says the
proposal would require local dealers to
register all the bikes they sell with the
police department. Private individuals
selling used bikes would be required to
register the sale at the city clerks office.

Mitchell testimony
uncertainscanty
WASHINGTON 5'-Furmer Atty. Gen.
John Mitchell fenced for hours yesterday
with House impeachment investigators.
"He's trying to get the benefit of the
Fifth Amendment without using it,'
commented Rep. John Seiberling (D-
Ohio) about Mtichell's testimony before
a closed session of the House Judiciary
Committee.
"HE'S A GENIUS at not recollecting."
Mitchell reportedly told the committee
that he did not wish to plead the Fifth
lAmendment against self-incrimination
but neither did he want to prejudice his
right to a fair trial in the Watergate
cover-up case.
But it was the cover-up that the com-
mittee wanted to know about. The panel
See MITCHELL, Page 9 #Che

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