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May 10, 1974 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, May 10, 1974

THEMCHIAN AL

Page Thirt(

Friday, May 10, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Thirt een

Store-
(continued from Page 3)
the flesh of the dolphin fish, not
of the intelligent mammalian
dolphin.
ON THE WAY out to the
supermarket, a talkative cab
driver told this reporter about
his experiences with the brainy
denizen of the deep.
"Back in 1951, '52, I worked
on a commercial fishing boat in
Mississippi. We sometimes acci-
dentally caught dolphins in our
nets. They got sold as animal
food."
He went on to tell about a re-
cent boycott that wasn't too well
publicized. A group organized a
boycott of tuna when it came to
their attention that dolphins are
often trapped and killed in tuna
nets. The boycott was lifted
when a method was found to
keep the dolphins out of the
nets.
SURE ENOUGH, there in the
Kroger fish department was
"dolphin." It looked like fish
flesh, however, not like mam-
mal meat.

sells alleged 'F1pper Filets'

reen

Customers freely voiced their
disgust at the prospect of buying
dolphin meat.
"It seems to me that we
should be able to get meat from
other animals that are less in-
telligent," said one young man
stroking one of his sideburns.
"Hamburger is more imperson-
al.
"Are you sure that it's real
dolphin meat," he asked, "like
Flipper the Dolphin?"
His friend was more vocifer-
ous. "I think it's disgusting,"-he
said. He began to raise his
voice. "I think it's a travesty, is
what it is. Don't these food dis-
tributors know where to draw
the line?"
One middle-aged woman shop-
per commented, "If it's regular
dolphin, I don't approve of it
and I wouldn't buy it." Another
middle-aged woman said, "I
wouldn't want any part of a
dolphin."
THE STORE MANAGER, when
asked if the flesh labeled "dol-
phin" was, in fact, dolphin said,

"I don't think it's from the same
kind of dolphin as Flipper, but I
must admit that question has
been bothering me." He sug-
gested asking the meat cutter.
The meat cutter recommended
calling Standard Fish and ask-
ing them. And they, as men-
tioned earlier, announced that
the dolphin is not really dolphin
but dolphin fish.
Kroger's dolphin comes in filet
form. It is good broiled or in
chowder, but is especially good
-- -.- -.
rg$$$

in souffle.
DOLPHIN SOUFFLE
z cup butter
r. cup sifted flour
1 teaspoons salt
2 cups milk
4 eggs separated
1 lb. dolphin, boiled
Melt butter in top of double
boiler. Blend in flour. Add salt
and milk and cook over direct
heat, stirring constantly until
the sauce boils and thickens.
Beat egg yolks until light, stir

in a little of the hot sauce and
pour back into rest of sauce.
Cook over boiling water, stirring
constantly, for two minutes. Re-
move from heat. Discard skin
of boiled dolphin, and flake the
fish. Mix fish with sauce. Beat
egg whites until stiff and fold
lightly but thoroughly into mix-
ture. Pour into a well-buttered 6
cup casserole and bake at 325
degrees for one hour. Serve im-
mediately, with a dry white
wine. Serves five.

4 7 . RT? I {' cT1 r'T'A41t TT fI TT T.f ,'-U-_=

DIALECTICSTUURN
MAY :5--78Q
at the
U-NION GAL LERY
(Ist floor, Michigan Union)
Screen Prints {,t
t7# by
MARTHA KELLER
and
JOAN HARKNESS
y gallery hours: Tuesday through Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
-dl1 i. Vw ~ .* 1t 4+/i yL. s. hM ~M 4W . V.t ktMi d 4.A .I VhJ~A 4I d1

Senate committee probes
Rebozo's loans to Nixon

WASHINGTON ( -- The
Senate Watergate committee
met behind closed doors yes-
terday with C. G. "Bebe" Re-
bozo, President Nixon's per-
sonal friend, appearing.
The committee has subpoen-
aed detailed financial records of
Rebozo, including those dealing
with loans to or from Nixon, Pa-
tricia Nixon Cox and the Pres-
ident's two brothers, court pa-
pers showed.
The Senate committee also
voted to issue a new subpoena
for Alexander Haig, White
House chief of staff, who last
week invoked executive privi-
lege in refusing to testify about
$100,000 which Rebozo has said
he received from a representa-
tive of Howard Hughes in 1969
and 1970. Rebozo has said the
money was intended as a Nixon
campaign contribution but was
kept in a vault and returned to
Hughes last year.
ELSEWHERE at the Capitol,
a final draft of a proposed House
report concludes that Presi-
dent Nixon's homes have cost
$17.1 million in federal funds

and says federal agencies
should try to recover any im-
proper expenditures.
The report will be considered
by the House Government Oper-
ations Committee next Tuesday.
Copies were sent to members
yesterday and The Associated
Press was permitted to take ex-
tensive notes from one copy.
The draft report includes the
findings previously disclosed
that some of the spending was
for items "far in excess of
what was required to meet se-
curity requests."
thru
Classifie

The University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
n the
POWER CENTER IT
BEST MUSICAL

PROJECT
OUTREACH
PSYCHOLOGY 201 1-2 credit hours
For those students who missed our mass meet-
ing last night, there are still some openings in
several of our projects. If you are interested in
"experimental learning" in one of 16 institu-
tional settings come to 554 THOMPSON STREET
-The Introductory Psychology Building or call:
764-9279 or 769-7179 TODAY.
HELP OTHERS HELP THEMSELVES

"ATLOEOF AWMUSCAL" NYtTiY A"OGHX IsWART,
IT'S A STORY OF TODAY." _wralu
Doc. 1-1T
(Eves S Mat 3p .) . -
,BEST MUSICAL STAGING
ON BROADWAY IN YEARS" -T tmes
SAM L.EVENE & EDDIE FOY JR.
E IA-(F11E51U E
!Evns, 8p mSuit, at 3p m) Mat. 28-30

CMH Development
Center
Citizens Against
Recidivism
Child Care Action
Center
Community Switch-
board Project
Drop-In Center for
Retarded Adults
Maxey Boys Training
Sesool
Northville State
Hospital

Political Perspectives
Difficulties with
Social and Learning
State Forensic Unit
Schools Project
T-Groups
Project Transition
Women's Crisis Center
Yorkwoods
Ypsilanti State
Hospital
Association for
Children

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