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June 15, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-06-15

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Saturday, June 15, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Nixon arrives in Saudi Arabia

JIDDA, Saudi Arabia (A') -
King Faisal welcomed Presi-
dent Nixon to his oil-rich king-
dom yesterday with a warm em-
brace and a warning that there
can be no permanent Arab-Is-
raeli peace until Israel gives
Jerusalem back to the Arabs.
Nixon arrived to a subdued
but friendly reception by a

moderately large crowd of Sau-
dis after the cheering and ju-
bilation of a two-day visit to
Egypt. Before his departure yes-
terday from Cairo, Nixon said
the United States is prepared to
help Egypt develop nuclear
power for peaceful uses.
FAISAL USED his air-condi-
tioned Rolls-Royce to zip, Nixon

New freshmen come
to summer orientation

from the airport to the guest
palace where the President will
stay. They drove at about 65
miles per hour through the
dusty streets of Jidda, applaud-
ed by sidewalk crowds of
about 5,000. The two leaders
then discussed international is-
sues for about 30 minutes.
Later, speaking at a state
dinner in the ballroom of the
royal palace, Faisal became
the second Arab leader in three
days to press Nixon publicly for
a more active U. S. role in re-
solving long - standing Middle
East issues.
President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt suggested on Wednesday
that the United States do more
to help determine the future of
the 3 million Palestinians dis-
placed in Israel's independence
war in 1948.
"WE BELIEVE that there will
never be a lasting peace in the
area unless Jerusalem is liber-
ated and returned to Arab sov-
ereignty, unless there is libera-

(Continued from Page 3)
Another drawback to campus
life, Young and Lerman say, is
that local men are "persistent
and animalistic."'
THE WELL - BRONZED and
halter-topped Lerman claimes,
"You find yourself asking 'Why
me?' " She says she feels un-
comfortable just walking around
the dorm and protests, "For
chicks to have to run around
just to avoid people who are
following them is disgusting."
Of a group of future freshmen
interviewed Thursday, around 80
per cent were pre-med.
For Zalenski, who is diabetic,
research is the ultimate goal in
taking pre-med courses. He says
he is "plenty worried" about
the competition, but notes,
"There are plenty of opportuni-
ties open by just going into the
medical field."
MILLIKEN is interested in
the "title, status and position"
which accompany a medical de-
gree. "I think everybody needs
a purpose, and this way I can
help people in doing something
I enjoy," he says.
Joe S e n k o, an orientation
leader and former pre-med as-
pirant, said he "kind of took on
the role as pre-med counselor"
for the freshmen in order to
caution them about crowding in
the field.
"Most of them are aware of
the competition," he says. "They
don't really know what it is,
Orientatic
U'official
(continued from Page 3)
Telfer says an important part
of orientation is that freshmen
can meet other p e o p l e who
share their academic interests.
Freshmen can socialize at mass
counselling meetings and make
friends who may turn up in
their classes, she claims.
Most importantly, Telfer says,
the freshmen are not rushed
during orientation. "They have
three days to look over the time
schedule and talk to current
students and counselors," she
adds.
TELFER ASSERTS that stu-

but they anticipate it."
Both Barquist and Senko are
orientation leaders for the first
time. "It is fun to see the
things these people are going
through for the first time and
how they seem semi-traumatic,"
Senko said. "It sort of puts you
back a few years."

tion of all the occupied Arab sion which were wrought on the
territories and unless Arab Arabs of Palestine are unpre-
peoples of Palestine regain cedented in history, for not even
their rights to return to their in the darkest ages had a whole
homes and the right of self-de- population of a country been
termination," Faisal said. driven out of their homes and
"The injustice and aggres- been replaced by aliens."
Sadat,- Nixon sign pact
for nuclear aid to Egypt
(continued from Page1) at Metrsa Matrub near the Lib-
U.S. assistance in developing yan border using nuclear ener-
peaceful nuclear energy since gy was started two years ago,
1955 and now was negotiating but was never put into opera-
with Washington for enriched tion, sources said.
.i rNIXON SIGNED the agree-
uranium for its nuclear reactors. ment as the last major act of
In Washington, two Senators his visit to Egypt.
expressed concern that the Sen. George Aiken of Ver-
Egyptians would develop nac- mont, senior Republican on the
lear weapons. Foreign Relation Committee,
"THERE ARE new methods said in Washington he would be
to develop a nuclear b o m b surprised if Nixon "does not
rather simply," said Sen. Henry have something nice for Israel"
Jackson (D-Wash.). A similar in the way of nuclear aid during
reeling was expressed by Sen. his visit there. Otherwise, he
Charles Percy (R-Ill.). added, "We would be accused of
h favoritism toward Egypt."
According to the diplomatic
sources here, Egypt needs im-
mediate, new supplies of elec-
tricity to head off a possible
power crisis in the early 1980s.
Egypt also plans to use nuc-
lear generators in the desalina-
tation of water from the Medit-
erranean Sea for land reclama-
tion projects in the western de-
sert, one source said.
With an estimated 95 per cent
of its land area an arid waste-
land, Egypt is anxious to imple- THIS WEEKEND
ment massive desert reclama- 8:30 $2.50
tion schemes to move some of *
its 37 million people away from Atlantic Record's
the crowded banks of the Nile THE NATINAL
River - the nation's only wat-
er source. RECVERY ACT
ztT&s-mtsa5AtsidIs

Gay Pride issue
on council agendo
(continued from Page 3) yet, but I imagine I'll vote
man Kathy Kozachenko, a self- against it as I did last year,"
proclaimed lesbian. Two other commented Councilman Robert
measures pertaining to gay Henry (R-Third Ward). "I don't
people were also submitted. believe gays have contributed
ONE OF the proposed reso- anything to the community for
lutions calls for an end to al- which they deserve recognition.
leged police harassment of gays Although individual gays have
because, according to Koza- made contributions, it is not be-
chenko, "gays have either been cause of their sexual prefer-
terrorized or gone unprotected ence."
by law officers." THE MOST vocal part of the
byhe oherprosedre gay demonstration is planned
The other proposed resolution to take place after the meas-
urges other communities to ures are defeated.
adopt legislation similar to Ann "We probably won't disrupt
Arbor's Human Rights Ordi- the meeting totally as we did
nance hich prevents discrimna- last year," said Parker. "We
tion on the basis of sexual pre- hope to get together as many of
ference. r . us as we can and plan to disrupt
All three resolutions will pro- the meeting for about 18 min-
bably be voted down by the utes after the vote."
council's Republican majority. Assuming that the resolutions
"I haven't read the resolution are rejected, local gays still
plan to go ahead with Gay
Pride Week which, according
nto Kozachenko, will involve "ed-
tative events."
A TEACH-IN with the Human
Rights Department at City Hall
is planned for Wednesday or
Thursday as well as other
dents who come in the fall have workshops.
to worry about moving, adjust- "We want to give people a
ing to a new roommate and chance to talk to gays and ask
1 i v i n g situation, and buying us questions," said Kozachen-
books, on top of just choosing ko. "We also plan to go out to
classes. such places as shopping centers
Aside from the standard Opin- and talk to people that usually
ion, Attitude and Interest Sur- don't have much contact with

EXPERTS HAVE said that
both desalinization of Mediter-
ranean seawater for land re-
clamation and generating elec-
tric power for new industrializa-
tion could best be provided by
nuclear energy.
The Soviet Union was report-
ed to have promised three years
ago to provide Egypt with one
nuclear power plant to augment
power production from the As-
wan High Dam, built in the late
1950's with Russian help. Sa far
as is known no plant was ever
built.
A water desalinization project

banjo, mandolin, autoharp.
WITH
TYLER WILSON
and DAVID PRINE
(John Prine's back-up)
1411 YKill S TE
179I 1

"IT CAN BE SAID, SIMPLY AND
WITH THANKS, THAT IT IS AN
ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIC MOVIE"
Jay Cocks
Time Magazine

vey (the "raw carrot test") ar
language tests,orientation pa
ticipants take a tour of the re
dence halls, health service, ai
the library. They have the opti
of touring the central, athleti
and north campuses, visiti
fraternities and sororities,
going swimming.

ar-
nd
on
ic,
ng
or

CAUPCA 4!5'ervicei

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Donald G. Zill, pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders,
John R. Waser, Brewster IL
Gere, Jr.
"Where Christ, Campus and
Community meet"
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665.6149
Minister: Howard F. Gebhart
10 a.m.--Worship Service and
Church School.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:15 a.m.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
and Sermon
7:00 p.m. - Holy Eucharist in
chapel.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665.0606
Holy Eucharist at noon at
Canterbury House.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
Services at 10:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.

IIARRY"S
ARMY
SURPLUS
Dunham HIKING
BOOTS $22.98 and up
2-Man NYLON TENT
with Rain Fly $41.98
2 Lb. Down SLEEPING
BAG $50.98
Primus MINI-STOVE
$11.98
G-1 GAS CANS
5 Gallon $11.98
TWO
ANN ARBOR
LOCATIONS:
201 E Washington
tat 4th)
994-3572
1166 Broadway
(north of Broadway bridge)
769-9247
OPEN MON.-SAT. 9-6

,j

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