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June 11, 1974 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-06-11

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 11, 1974

page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, June 11, 1974

Conservatives, liberal elected

President rejects orders

(Continued from Page 1)
align themselves wi'h it sa-
dent voters."
BECK AND HRP 1,ueful
Larry Mann ran on : :adical
platform of commuitny and Stu-
dent control of Cie schools.
Beck said the re'uins we:e
'v e r y inconsistent" i t h a t
voters defeated the rnitlage in-
:rease but elected tandidates
who supported the tI-i' hike,
which HRP opposed.
Mann, 14, ran a write-in cam-
paign after school officials re-
fused to accept his nominating
petitions, citing state laws pro-

hibiting people under 18 from
holding elected office.
He received 304 votes, a low
total compared to approximate-
ly 1,500 garnered by IS-year-old
HRIP candidate Sonia Yaco in
1972.
MANN POINTED out that II-
NP ran "a stronger campaign"
for Yaco and that the party's
large slate of hopefuls that year
drew attention to Yaco's can-
didacy.
At the conservative end of the
spectrum, outgoing school board
member Theodore Heusel claim-

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ed Israel won a seat because
of crowded conservative field.
Besides the three Republican-
backed candidates, hopefuls E.
Stevens Binder and George Ko-
lasa split the conservative sup-
port, Heusel contended.
Sign law..
gets f irst
reading OK
Last night City Council gave
preliminary approval to an ordi-
nance which, if passed a second
time, will limit the number and
location of billboards erected in
the city.
A state Supreme Court ruling
May 23 struck down parts of the
city's existing billboard law as
too broad because it limited
nearly all forms of commercial
signs.
The proposed ordinance would
limit the number of city bill-
boards to 30 and would prohibit
billboards from being erected
within 500 feet of any park,
playground, bridge, school prop-
erty, residential building or
within 50 feet of any street.
The pygmy owl, Canadas
smallest owl, is about seven
inches long.

(Continued from Page 1)
to Watergate prosecutors. Sirica
already holds the tape, but
Nixon lawyer James St. Clair
asked him not to release it
pending approval.
In his six-page letter to Ro-
dino, Nixon attacked the com-
mittee's warning that it may
assume that material he with-
holds is damaging to him.
The President said his execu-
tive privilege claim "must be
accepted without adverse infer-
ence-or else the privilege itself
is undermined, and the separa-
tion of powers nullified."
EHRLICHMAN, scheduled to
stand trial with three others on
conspiracy charges stemming
from the break-in of Daniel
Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office,
had subpoenaed all his notes,
hand written on yellow legal
pads while he was President
Nixon's domestic counselor be-
tween January 1971 and April
30, 1973.
tast Friday Gesell angrily
told St. Clair that refusal to
allow Ehrlichman to see all the
notes with his lawyer present
"borders on obstruction" of jus-
tice and threatened to hold a
contempt hearing.
In a three-page letter to the
judge, St. Clair said that Ehr-
lichman could examine the en-
tire file of his notes of conver-
sations he had with the Presi-
dent but that his attorney still
had to wait in another room.
ST. CLAIR said that 'after
Ehrlichman had determined he
wanted a particular document,
a presidential lawyer would re-
view the request to determine
whether the material was rele-
vant to the case.
Last Friday, U.S. Dlisrict
Judge John Sirica had :rdered
a 15%-minute section of a Sept.
15, 1972 tape recording turned
over to the prosecutors, saying
that he, Sirica, made. a mis-
take last year when he deemed
that part of the tape as privi-
leged.
The judge, however, gave St.
Clair a chance over the week-
end to review the sectiin of
tape and comment on whether

it should be turned over to the
prosecutor.
ST. CLAIR wrote Sirica that
the President "disagrees that
the portion of the tape in ques-
tion relates in any way to
Watergate," and that the Presi-
dent stands on his claim of
privilege. He said he will file
an appeal by Friday.
Also in Sirica's courtroom an
attorney for former Atty. Gen.
John Mitchell a r g u e d that
charges against Mitchell in the
Watergate cover-up should be
dismissed.
Lawyer William Hundley said
Mitchell's chance of a fair trial
was destroyed by his appear-
ance before the Senate Water-
gate Committee last summer.
Meanwhile, the special prose-
cutor and the White House ask-
ed the Supreme Court to re-
lease materials which reported-
ly reveal that Nixon was named
by a grand jury as an unindict-
ed con-conspirator in the cover-
up.
Tom Jones
Ann Arbor Film Co-op
Aud. A, 7, 9:15
Tony Richardson's superb
1963 adaptation of Henry Field-
ing's novel of life and love in
19th century England returns
tonight for what should be an-
other successful appearance.
Somehow, this lusty triple Os-
car winner (including Best Pic-
ture) starts the audience laugh-
ing at frame one and keeps up
the pace until the very last
name on the crawl at the end.
Richardson's keenly develop-
ed timing and masterful visual
touches will both delight and
amaze you. Photography, cos-
tumes, and the other technical
credits are extremely impres-
sive - especially John Addi-
son's perky music score that is
humorous in itself.
-David Blomquist

Gettoknowthe twoof
you before yo 0u become
the thn e Wyou.
Get to know what you both really like.
What you both really want out of life.
Get to enjoy your freedom together until you both
decide you want to let go of a little bit of it.
But make it your choice.
Research statistics show that more than half of all
the pregnancies each year are accidental. Too many
of them, to couples who thought they knew all about
family planning methods.
Get to know how the two of you don't have to
become the three of you.
Or the four of you. Or...
Plnned Paenthooi-
Children by choice. Not chance.
Pb, further informatiow, write Planned Parenthoo,
Box 431, Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019.
PlaSadPareatkoad i aatia a profitrrganizatio rhee be s4
iaftettatied eet wr e aasotfam iaaning t4 alawh. ata s d t .
""Own veIak wa 1w a * C VW~eakable-

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