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June 08, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-06-08

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 8, 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, June 8, 1974

Fingei
(Continued from Page 5)
shows he is still a consummate
showman.
Martin apprenticed with Bil
Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys
for five years, starting in 1949.
They were regulars at WSM'
Grand Ole Opry in Ntashville,
the dean of all country shows.
He then joined the Osborne
Brothers, Bob and So-ny, f/>r
two years before forming the
Sunny Mountain Boys. Tle spent
four years on the 3ig iatn
Frolic in Detroit and as t,'"L.W-
TV in Windsor.
His performance Tsursday

r pickin'
was marked by an overwhelm-
ing enthusiasm between him
and the audience. Interactirg
with the crowd is an essential
part of Martin's style, and he
can get an audience who)ping
and hollering. Be is a showanan
in the truest sense of the ward
and is as much a country comic
as a musician. Bad jokes mnd
outrageous facial expressions
were interspersed w i t h his
music.
But while his comedy m:iy
seem like high camp to some,
his music is pure country all
the way. The songs are gems

NEW AMERICAN
MOVEMENT
The New Americsn Movement (NAM) exists to help
organize a movement for democratic socialism in the United
Stntes. Our aim is to establish working-class control of the
enormous productive copacity of American industry, to
create a society that will provide material comfort and se-
curity for all people, and in which the full and free develop-
ment of every individual will be the basic goal. Such a
society will strive for decentralization of decision makina,
an end to bureoucrotic rule, and porticpation of all people in
shopina their own lives and the direction of society.
OPEN ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Huron Valley NAM
SUNDAY, JUNE 9-2 P.M.
ANDERSON ROOM "A" MICH. UNION
SOutdoor Clea'fra-nce Sale
;+ ON MORE THAN'
r 1000 CHILDREN'S BOOKS
200 TITLES NO BOOK OVER $1.75
& All Books Reduced 40 to 70%
SUMMER FUN CAN MEAN READING
BOOKS. BRING YOUR ALLOWANCE AND -6
Q SHOP IN UN-AIRCONDITIONED SUNSHINE 4
1 Shop at Centicore's Outdoor Q
BARGAIN PLAZA4
SALE BEGINS MONDAY, JUNE 10
N ui.enticore Bookshop
336 MAYNARD

good
of that genre, unrestrained and
unihibited. They are either pure
fun or overwhelmingly heart-
rending - there is no middle
ground.
The best song of the lot is an
old Bill Monroe tune, "20-20
Vision." A song of lost lose,
Martin makes the song all tis
with his unique interpreta:ion.
"I've been to the doctor, he
says I'm all rightI know %nat
he's lyin', I'm losin' my sight
he should have examined :he
eyes of my mind 20-20 visiiia
and walkin' round blind."
The Sunny Mountain Boys are
a more than able backup ve-
hicle. The banjo, guitar, bass
and mandolin blend together
like interlocking gears on fine
machinery.
The one flaw in the Martin
show, however, is the female
vocalist, Gloria Belle. She is
nowhere near the stature of
Tammy Wynette or Dolly Par-
ton. Her voice is, at best, unin-
teresting, and listening to her
do "Keep on the Sunny Sde"
made me long for Maybelle
Carter's original version.
The second act on the bill
was the P-Bell's regulars, "The
R.F.D. Boys." No one can real-
ly steal the show away froi a
man like Martin, but it's quite
an accomplishment when you
come close.
The Boys came close, awfully
close. Here is a group that is
very talented and perform with
a high degree of skill and verve.
They mix traditional and mod-
ern material in just the right
amount. (I wonder if Jimmy
Martin knew what "Down to
Seeds and S t e m s Again"
moans?)
They closed out their set with
a brilliant rendition of that
grandaddy of f i d d I e tunes,
"Orange Blossom Special." The
technical expertise needed to
play that song is enormous,
and they did it flawlessly. If
you haven't heard the R.FD.
Boys yet, by all means do no.
They seem incapable of disap-
pointing an audience.
In 1890, according to one story,
a New England woman used
baking soda instead of cream
of tartar while making peanut
taffy. Her mistaxe became
known as peanut brittle.

(Continued from Page s)
audience selects the subject
matter, yes, but the cast over-
lays the audience's choices onto
one of several pre-planned stock
situations.
The actual dialogue of each
scene is composed "on
spot." The general flow and toe.
blocking are, however, for the
most part rehearsed in ad-
vance. Such preparation frees
the cast at showtime from hav-
ing to work with the mechanical
details of performance and per-
mits them to concentrate solely
on "writing" the "script."
The advance work also makes
possible coordination between
music - aptly prepared and
performed by Diane Bulgarelli
- the action out front. Admit-
tedly, some spontaneity is lost,
but Extension's finale 'situation'
-a Broadway musical parody
Slaughterhouse 5
Friends of Newsreel
7:30, 9:30
Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Slaugh-
terhouse 5 is a fascinating work
about the bombing of Dresden
in 1945, and is a vivid picture
of the futility of war. The film
made of the novel is very ac-
curate, and does not lose the-
theme that Vonnegut intended,
as so many films adapted from
books do.
The main character, Billy Pil-
grim, is messed up in time. He
is at Dresden, in Schenectady,
and on the planet Tralfamador
all at the same time. He is a
gentle person who is constant-
ly victimized by the people
around him.
The direction is well carried
out, and helps to create the
proper effect. The acting is
good, but there seems to be a
few rough spots. If you are a
fan of Vonnegut, then this film
should not be missed.
-David Warren
Golden Voyage
Arnold
Golden Voyage: Michigan
Arnold: State
The other night in a dream
I saw two of the worst movies
I can ever remember seeing:
Arnold and The Golden Voyage
of 4Siabad. Not only were they
just bad pieces of film, b u t
they didn't do much for my

- would not otherwise be p-
sible.
Generally, the show's staging
comes of fquite well, given the
Rubayiat's ad hoc thrust plat-
form - four tables with felt
thrown over them.
An interesting touch is the
closed-circuit TV system the
management installed so that
patrons seated at the bar -
which is placed at right angles
to the stage - could have an
unimpaired view of the action.
Extension continues at the
Rubayiat Wednesday through
Saturday nights until August 10,
with ticket prices scaled from
$1 to $2.50. Theatergoers should
mark it as a must on their
schedule because - to para-
phrase M c G o w a n ' s com-
ment during a VD skit - Ex-
tension is "something to clap
about."
toiui'14ht
ego: I was about the only per-
son in both theaters.
There was some small excite-
ment toward the end of Sinbad:
some sexy squeals, insinuating
laughs, and helpless giggles. Un-
fortunately, I soon realized that
this was not part of the film-
two ushers Krebs and Veronsky,
were playing footsie in the last
row.
Oh, why didn't my editors,
Blomquist and Fink, steer me
clear of these bombs? F o r
heavens sake don't make the
same mistake I did - avoid
these two dregs at all costs
-Louis Meldmian
Spike's Gang
The Movies, Briarwood
Lee Marvin again asserts him-
self as a master performer,
playing .Harry Spikes in this sur-
prisingly amusing western -
'surprisingly" amusing because
it happens to be nothing more
than the story of three young
kids, tired of the chores of
home, who run away and get
hooked up with the fiercest and
meanest bank robber in the
world.
Still, Spike's wisdom and mel-
low nature draws the three lads
to him; somehow, he has a
deep-down loneliness which lets
him be their idol.
The picture was shot in Spain,
with director Richard Fleischer
doing a fine job of tying and
keeping the movie together.
-Louis Meldman

'The Extension': Fun

PD. POL. ADV.
Who Should Control Public Schools?
STUDENTS are directly affected by the schools. Yet by law they cannot
serve on the boards that run those schools. Students should have a determ-
ining voice in the governing of their schools.
WORKERS should have power to determine their own working conditions.
All school employees, including busdrivers, teachers, secretaries, and cus-
todial workers, must have their constiutional and human rights guaranteed.
These rights include the right to strike and to form and join unions.
PARENTS and non-staff non-student members of the community must be
adequately represented on community school control boards. Present and
past School Boards have consistently ignored input from the community
they supposedly serve. HRP feels that the community should control their
school.
HRP also supports an immediate end to all forms of discrimination in the
public schools, including racism, sexism, ageism, and tracking. The Human
Rights Party is running two candi-
dates in a supposedly non-partisan
election. School Boards are political,
as are their individual members. With
Astrid and Larry, you know exactly
what their politics are and what they
would do when elected.
Write in Larry MANN
Vote Astrid BECK
JUNE 10
Jbm nu Rahx1 at

"IT CAN BE SAID, SIMPLY AND
WITH THANKS, THAT IT IS AN
ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIC MOVIE"
Jaycocka
Time Magazine

THE THREE
MUSKETEEIRS
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