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May 18, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-05-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, May 18, 197

P~g ihtTEMCIGNDIYSaudy ay1,17

South:
SUMMERTON, S.C. P - -"It
is amazing to see how the
blacks and the white get long
so good in everyday life, b a t
when you mix them ;i the
schools - boom!"
That's the assessment of Jos-
eph Richburg, the chairman of
the school board in this Stoath
Carolina town of 6,5()0.
RICHBURG, a black, wasn't
referring to violence in t n e
schools but to the state of school
integration two decades after
the Supreme Court's landiirk
desegregation ruling.
It was 20 years ago yesterday
that the nation's highest t ourt
handed down its decision out-
lawing separate schools for
blacks and whites.
At that time, Summeri-n had
schools for blacks and schools
for whites. Today, there is only
one public school system, but
only three white youths attend
public schools. More than 400
whites are enrolled at the pri-
vate Clarendon Hall caoimy,
nestled in a grove of pines on
the outskirts of the town.
OF SUMMERTON'S 6,500 cit-
izens, 5,200 are blacks, and the
public schools have 2,000 stu-
dents from the town and s ar-
rounding areas.
Richburg, seated in the bar-
ber shop he owns and looking
out on a quiet downtown stir-et,

20 'integr
said "things are better n(w school was
than they once were, but here's percentage
plenty of room for improve- One said
ment. even 50-50
"We have no racial problems sending m:
in this town. The whites a n d schools. Ni
blacks work good together. tint up, they w(
the white people just don't want 6-1 or may
to desegregate the schools. ' The perc
'!f the ratio was even 50-50,)
sider sending my kids to the pu
Now, the way it adds up, they w
numbered 6-T or maybe 7-1 b)
-a while parent, Sum

BILLY DuBOIS, mayor of
Summerton, shared Richburg's
assessment. "We get along bet-
ter here, I mean the blacks and
the whites, than any pla:e I
know of. It's a peaceful town,"
he said.
But DuBois, a contractor with
a daughter not old enoug -for
school, said he has no expl-na-
tion for the still segregated
schools - "I can't say why
parents with school-age .child-
ren don't send them to tiublic
school. I'm not in that position
as yet."
SEVERAL WHITE citizens,
none of whom wanted to be
identified, said the reason for
the white flight to the private

E. C. Cova
grocery sto
Force pilot
children in
are his.
"I SPEN
cle Sam, al
said. "I r
every kind
people are
ter what ci
B. 0. But
intendent, s
philosophy
bed off on
"Those ti
get along g
children," I
are no dis
They get a

'ated' year
simply a matter of been together with the blacks
s. all of their lives."
, "If the ratio was Butler, who is black, a I o o
, I might consider said race relations in Summer-
y kids to 'he public ton were excellent and shared
sw, the way it adds the view that whites refused to
ould be outnumbered send their children to pubic
be 7-1 by blacks.' schools because of )he 1 a r g e
entages don't t other number of blacks.
-:yi i:ts: - e v a u "WHY THEY feel this wa', I
don't understand," he said. "I
I might con- hope one day it will come to
blic schools. completely mixed schools, where
our children work and study to-
'ould be out- gether as our adults now do."
Y blacks.' Richburg voiced this view,
too. "It may not be too far cff,"
merton, S.C he said. "It should iappeo and
I think it will happen. Some-
times it takes the white peop>le
n, owner of a small time to adjust to change."
re and a retired Air Not everyone is so optimistic,
. The three w Iti t e however. C. A. Ridgeway, the
the public schools police: chief who heads a force
of two blacks and two whites,
was. asked if. there will ever be
T 21 years.with Un- full integration in Sumnierton's
1 over the-earth,' he public schools.
ubbed elbows with "I DON'T KNOW. I just o n't
of person, and tound know," he said.
only people, no mat- Meanwhile, Summerton. pub-
olor they are. ' lic schools face financial prob-
ler, the scaool super- lems and Butler says it's relat-
aid some of Covan's ed to the racial situation. Sum-
seems to hage rub- merton isn't wealthy to begin
his. youngsters. with - a survey two years ago
hree white students ranked it 75th of the state s 93
treat with tC- other school districts in potential ie-
he observed. "There venue - and Butler said white
ciplinary problems, parents with children ii private
long as if they had schools are slow to help the
-- public schools.
"We have enough woney to
just get by, no more," Butler
said. "Our biggest problem is
getting the voters to approve an
increase in taxes to nelp the
schools."
For anyone who wants to sing,
play or lisen to folk or old-
tlie music.
NEXT GATHERING
THIS SUNDAY, MAY 19
AT THE ARK-1421 Hill St.,
Ann Arbor

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Howard F. Gebhart
10 a.m.-Worship Service and
Church School.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
Services at 10:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Holy Eucharist at noon at
Canterbury House.
THE ARK-1421 Hill St.
4:00 p.m.-Worship Service.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Wash.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m-Contem-
porary Celebration of L i f e.
Methodist Y o u t h Fellowship
Choir, Liturgical Dance Choir,
Instrumentalists.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Eucharist in
chapel.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders,
John R. Waser, Brewster H.
Gere, Jr.
"Where Christ, Campus and
Community meet"
Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Sermon Title: "Taking Jesus'
Yoke."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:15 a.m.

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

Get to know the two of
you before yoecome
the three of you.
Get to know what you both really like.
What you both really want out of life.
Get to enjoy your freedom together until you both
decide you want to let go of a little bit of it.
But make it your choice.
Research statistics show that more than half of all
the pregnancies each year are accidental. Too many
of them, to couples who thought they knew all about
family planning methods.
Get to know how the two of you don't have to
become the three of you.
Or the four of you. Or...
Planned Parenthood
Children by choice. Not chance.
for further information, write Planned Parenthood,
Box 431, Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019.

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