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May 17, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-05-17

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PageK

Friday, May 17;-974

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

1k'ine
4

Friday, May 17; 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page ~lire

Regents discuss film guidelines Board's composition hit

{ (continued froft Page 3)
the discussion. He vigorously
questioned the people who ad-
dressed the board, often chal-
lenging their "no-guideline" po-
sitions. -
The three speakers further
agreed that film groups should
be held more accountable for
their financial operations, par-
ticularly concerning how profits
are spent.
PRESENTLY most on-campus
movie societies operate on a
non-profit basis in that all in-

come is used to buy movie
equipment and in sdveral in-
stances sponsor film festivals.
Film groups, like other stu-
dent organizations, must now
make financial statements avail-
able to SGC, but the documents
are not systematically checked.
The administration has con-
sidered r e q uir i n g the film
groups to channel all their funds
through the student accounts of-
fice, claiming that procedure
would insure no money is mis-

Israel launches
retaliatory strikes

appropriated.
FLEMING S A I V yesterday
that the administration is work-
ing on a document that will bet-
ter define the financial man-
agement needed by student or-
ganizations.
At their April meeting, the
Regents instituted a moratorium
that will prohibit the film so-
cieties from using any Univer-
sity auditoriums after May 31-
a severe blow to groups.
Fleming yesterday indicated
that the Regents may reconsid-
er the ban before it officially
goes into effect.
RECENTLY a number of peo-
ple have attacked the Regents'
move to impose guidelines on
campus film groups as an effort
to drive the organizations out of
business, thus increasing attend-
ance at local theatres in which
the University owns stock.
Fleming yesterday condemned
those charges as groundless,
pointing out that last year the
University received only about
$5,000 from its financial inter-
ests in the Michigan, State,
Campus, and Wayside Theatres.
Regents Gerald Dunn (D-Li-
vonia) and Lawrence Lindemer
(R-Lansing) sit on the six-per-
son board of directors which
supervises the operation of the
theatres.

(Continued from Page 8)
groups to send representatives
to the Policy Board, . a move
they argue was demanded by
HUD.
IT SEEMS apparent, how-
ever, that the appointment of
new members to the Policy
Board will not increase the
nearly non-existent interest in
the board among Model Cities
area residents.
To the Policy Board leader-
ship, the reason for the declin-
ing interest is obvious. After the
1972 fight with City Council and
the resulting ordinance change
which "stripped the Policy
Board of all its power," there
was no reason for the residents
of the community to take much
interest.
Former Human Rights Party
council member Jerry DeGrieck
agrees that "people quickly saw
it as a sham," but adds that the
Wheeler "crowd" had a his-
tory of "discouraging other
blacks from participating" on'
the board.
POLICY BOARD leaders,
while admitting a "certain in-
fluence" on the rest of t h e
members, deny that they have
discouraged participation from
others in the black community,
Citizen participation in Model
Cities cannot be called a suc-
cess at this point in the face

of such very low interest in Pol-
icy Board elections, whatever
the reasons for it. To write citi-
zen participation off as a total
failure, however, would be to
ignore all the contributions that
have been made by citizens on
the Policy Board and the con-
trolling boards of the operating
agencies.
The basic question of the Mod-
el Cities "experiment" has not
been answered, however. There
has never been any doubt that
a group of private citizens can
make recommendations, f o r
such groups do constantly. The
question is whether private citi-
zens, especially those without
professional training and ex-
pertise, can efectively control
a complex program which af-
fects their lives.
REPUBLICANS like Fair-
banks seem to be implicitly an-
swering 'no' when complaining
that professionals within t h e
Model Cities area are not being ,
asked to participate.
For DeGrieck, however, t h e
answer is obvious. "If you give
people the power, they will use
it," he asserts. "But neither the
city nor HUD ever intended to
permit much citizen participa-
tion. Perhaps it was doomed
from the start."

(ContinUed from Page 1)
as 300 persons may have been
killed or wounded in the com-
plex. .
A doctor at a hospital in Sidon
said 50 casualties were brought
in there and 11 of the victims
were dead on arrival. "Many
other casualties were taken to
another hospital in the city, but
JEWTISH
CHORAL
GROUP
Do you like to sing?
Want to learn some
Jewish music?
There ore now
openings in our
Jewish Choral Group.
Come Sunday at
7:30 p.m. to HILLEL
1429 Hill or call
Ellen Katz, 769-9575

I don't know how many," the
doctor said.
IN CAIRO, Egyptian Foreign
Minister Ismail Fahmy warned
that Arab states could not stand
idly by in the face of "Israeli
acts of agression."
And in Washington, the White
House said of the Arab attack
on Maalot and the Israeli re-
taliatory strikes: "Continuing
cycles of violence of this sort
can only obstruct the achieve-
ment of a peaceful settlement of
the Middle East."
Despite the Israeli air strikes
into Lebanon, Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger flew as sched-
iled to Damascus yesterday and
held long discussions with Sy-
rian President Hafez Assad in
a continuing effort to bring
about a troop disengagement.
along the Israeli-Syrian front.
KISSINGER admitted earlier
to reporters that the Maalot
attack "at a minimum . .
will- cause some delay" in the
negotiations. On the flight from
Tel -Aviv to Damascus senior
U.S. officials did not brief news-
men as had been customary in
previous trips between the two
capitals.

I

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--
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