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August 23, 1973 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-08-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'age Ten

THE SUMMER DAILY

Thursday, August 23, 1973

Kissinger named to
fil Rogers'ps

(Continued from Page 1)
Rogers also has been openly
unhappy svith the White House
involvement in the Watergate
affair and has criticized the
claim of national security to ex-
cuse establishment of s e c r e t
"plumbers" groups to plug gov-
ernment leaks.
He has clearly separated him-
self from Watergate and has
proudly talked of the State De-
partment's clean role in the
affair.
SOME STATE Department of-
ficials said after the announce-
ment that the timing of Rogers'
resignation was tied to his feel-
ing about Watergate,
However, Rogers told newsmen
in a brief meeting following Nix-
on's announcement that 'I would

have left whether there had been
a Watergate or not."
Nixon said yesterday that it
was Rogers' own decision to
leave.
IN ANNOUNCING that Kis-
singer was taking over the State
Department, N i x o n refrained
from any description of his abil-
ity or his role in the past.
But by saying Kissinger would
keep his job as chief White
House Foreign Affairs adviser,
Nixon made clear the impor-
tance he places on the former
Harvard professor.
For the first time since the
advent of special White House
advisers for foreign policy, the
secretary of state will have both
roles.

UAW leaders leave Chrysler talks
Doug Fraser, left, UAW sice president for Chrysler division, walks with UAW president Leonard Wood-
cock as they leave the morning session of negotiations with Chrysler representatives in Detroit yester-
day. The UAW International Executive Board selected Chrysler Tuesday as pacesetter and possible
strike victim if agreement is not reached by the September 14th deadline.
President declares Watergate
scandal 'water under bridge'

in.E7761-9O0
CORNELL WILDE'S
NO BLADE
OF GRASS
at 7 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)
House aides. He said under for-
mer President John Kennedy
and Lyndon Johnson "burglariz-
ing of this tyre" took place "on
a very large scale," but did not
elaborate.
* Said his De'iocratic prede-
cessors at the White Iouse
authorized far more wiretaps
than he had, and added that he
wished wiretlips had detected the
plot to ass-ussinote Kennedy, a
murder he said followed "a ter-
rible bretikdos in out- protective
secturif5
THE NEWS conference was
held us part of Nixoin's campaign
tsoovercisme the Watergate scan-
dot's imspact (tnl Iis tidmninistra-
iiti.Ase fielded qtestins, at
titmes joking with and at other
times briskly sparring with news-
men, the President shifted to for-
eign and ilomestic issues.
The fact that the first 30 mi-
utes of questioning was de-oted
exct'tsi'-el to Watergate "shows
vot how consumed we are" with
"the stanidit rather thou the
business of the people.' Nixon
said.
"Years from now," he added,
when historians examine the rec-
ord of his administration they
will see on foreign and domestic
issues that it "deserves high
marks rather than low marks."
"NO, I SHALL not resign," the
President declared. He added
that he will "use every day of
those three-and-a-half years" left
in his terra "trving to get the
people of the United States to
recognize, vhatever mistakes se
have made, in the long run this
administration" made the world
safer for their children and made
their lives better at home.
He made critical reference to
the "constant barrage" of news
media renorts on the Watergate
scandal, then declared:
"Watergate is an episode I
deeply deplore. If I were running
the campaign rather than trying
to run the country and particular-
ly the foreign policy of the coun-
try it would never have hap-
pened."
BUT, he continued, Watergate
is "water under the bridge-it's
gone" and now is the time to
get on with the "business of the
people,"
Nixon acknowledged that then-
acting FBI director Patrick Gray
warned him in a telephone con-
versation that "some of my top
aides are not cooperating" with
the just-begun Watergate investi-
gation.

Gray has said he told Nixon in
early July 1972 some of his aides
were trying to "mortally wound"
him. Nixon said he did not re-
member those words "but that is
irrelevant."
THE MAIN POINT, Nixon said,
was that " I told him to go for-
ward with a full press on the in-
vestigation.'
The President said Haldeian's
testimony on the key MrIch 21
White Hituse meeting was ac-
curate. Ile then proceeded to
recoil wh-'t took place at that
meeting, giving this account:
Dean reported that one of the
Watergate defendants was at-
temptitg to blackmail the White
louise, threatening tos disclsise
niational security msatters unless
he was paid $120,000.
NIXON SAID ie told lean that
it was obsioushthe plan would not
"htive any chance to sticceed"
unless the men were given execu-
tive clemency and that "we can't
give clemency." He said he also
toltd Dean thtit "twhile we could
raise the money he indicated in
answer to my question it would
probably take a million dollars
over four years-the problem
was how do you get money to
them . . . " Nixon recalled. He
then said that he told Dean:
"John, it's wrong. It won't
work. We can't give clemency.
We've got to get this story out."
The President's account of the
crucial, meeting paralleled what

he had said earlier, adding some
new details, and conflicted with
Dean's testimony that Nixon said
raising $1 million hush fund
"would be no problem."
NIXON PURSED his lips at
times and often appeared nervous
and strained as he listened to
the stream of Watergate ques-
tionss, and on occasion glanced
upward toward the blue summer
sky. At times his answers seemed
rambling: others were quick and
lacking in detail.

at
8.45

L

W

ALLAN BATES and GENEVIEVE BUJOLD in Philipe de Broca's
TIE IN"G I OFHARTS
Our perenially favorite film returns again' Wild, raffish comedy. A Scottish private
in World War I releases the inmates of a mental asylum in a French town that is
sitting on a time bomb. The sanity of insanity-or vice versa
TONIGHT-August 23rd Only! 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
th' an a orest firoeaburn
COMING TUESDAY, SEPT. 11-Ken Russell's WOMEN IN LOVE
WED. & THURS., SEPT. 12 & 13-TWILIGHT ZONE FESTIVAL
COMING SEPT. 24-30-Francois Truffaut's TWO ENGLISH GIRLS
ALL SHOWINGS IN AUD A ANGELL HALL--$1
Tickets for al oi each evenings performances an sale outside the auditorium at 6:30 p.

I

Schools teac h your ldds
hw wto roa n w ,e
wbeachthem
how to save ives.
The American d C&s
We dr4tknow where
w~II6e needed next
You"dnteithe.
... .ln .inribsa d 1the p
AMEIAlfW CR CAM

more than tree s.
~'AntJgr.od~hptk

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