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August 22, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-08-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, August 22, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Wednesday, August 22, 1973 THE SUMMER DAILY

EI/EUY WATER P
IN TIIIS COUNTI
A PRICE ON HIS
BUT THE LAW THAT PRO'
REWARD HAS GONE ALMOST
TUE WATER ACT
made it unlawful "to throw, discharge, or d
matter of any kind or description whatever in
water of the United States." The only exce
permit to pollute is obtained from the Arm:
neers.
DTO
1T

OLLITTERI
IIE HAS
HEAD to Ol

Pag Fiv
Strikers' break
A striking trucker ladles a
meal from a communal pot in
a village some 12 miles from
Santiago, Chile. The truckers
have been joined in their strike
by other groups protesting the
policies of Marxist President
Salvadore Allende.
AP Photo
Chile hit
by major
protest
SANTIAGO, Chile (A-Terror-
ists fire-bombed a labor union
district office and dynamited a
rail line yesterday as Chile was
hit by a nationwide strike in
many sectors of the troubled
economy.
Striking truckers, bus sd taxi
owners were joined by store own-
ers, professional employes and
labor groups.
The paricipants ranged from
physicians to pilots for LAN-
Chile, the state airline.
AN ESTIMATED half a mil-
lion Chileans from the country's
10 million inhabitants participat-
ed in the walkouts, ranging from
24 to 48 hours in sympathy with
the transport strike and protest-
ing the policies of Marxist Presi-
dent Salvador Allende, who has
vowed to turn Chile Socialist.
The center of the caiptal was
tranquil during the morning with
fewer people on the streets be-
cause of lack of public transpor-
tation and closed shops and
stores.
National lottery shops were
busy as usual selling tickets for
the weekly drawing which brings
a top prize of nearly $10,000 in
Chilean escudos.
BEFORE D A W N yesterday,
the Santiago headquarters of the
Central Workers Confederation
was fire-bombed. Nobody was
hurt but three families living in
the same old mansion in a work-
ing-class district of the capital
were left homeless.
The confederation is Chile's sin-
gle largest labor organization and
is controlled by Marxists on a
national level. But the Santiago
district is led by members of
opposition parties who decided to
call the local out on strike with
the others at midnight Monday
for 48 hours.
The railway line between San-
tiago and San Antonio, central
Chile's main fishing, port on the
Pacific, was dynamited. The line
to the capital on the state rail-
has been used to bring seafood
road system because of the truck-
ing strike. Nobody was hurt.
Service was expected to be re-

stored today.
T H E CONFEDERATION of
Truck Owners went on strike
July 26 protesting the lack of
new vehicles, spare parts and
low tariffs. They also wanted
guarantees from the leftist gov-
ernment that they would not be
nationalized.
A week later, most bus and
taxi owners joined them in a
sympathy strike. The walkouts
began to snowball as they did
during last October's nationwide
strikes, which resulted in street
violence and $201) million in pro-
duction losses,

VIDES FOR.
UNNOTICED
of 1899
eposit any refuse
nto any navigable
ption is when a
y Corps of Engi-

245 900.

The law makes every individual and corporate polluter
subject to a fine of 500 to 2,500 dollars for each day of the
violation.
And whoever catches the polluter can get half the fine as
a reward.
There are over 40,000 industrial polluting plants in this
country operating outside the law.
If you want to know how to catch them write for The
Bounty Hunters' Guide on Water Pollution, The Project on
Clean Water, Natural Resources Defense Council, 36 West 44th
Street, New York, N.Y. 10036.
The best way to fight water pollution is to make your
own waves.
Prepared by the Stern Concern. Space contributed by The Michigan Daily

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