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August 17, 1973 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-08-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten
'U' affirms
film group
schedluling
(Continued from rage 3)
increased showing of "commer-
cial films for which admission is
charged" as reasons for the
delay.
"I don't think they have any
evidence that anyone has been
cheating," said art school Prof.
George Manupelli at the Tuesday
meeting. "They're trying to force
one or two film organizations out
of business and in the process get
these regulations on the others
so that in the future they can
intervene in their affairs when
it suits their purposes." Manu-
pelli is director of the Ann Arbor
Film Festival.
Although University officials at
first told SOB members that they
w e r e fundamentally concerned
about preservation of the Univer-
sity's tax-exempt status, Ken-
nedy's I a t e r statement empha-
sized that some student organiza-
tions may in fact be "groups of
individuals seeking to profit from
business enterprises."
C U R R E N T SGC regulations,
said Kennedy in a July letter to
the SOB, make "no adequate pro-
vision for enforcement" of pro
visions governing the activities of
student organizations
Although Kennedy conceded
yesterday that he could "appre
ciate" concerns that increasing
the fitim groups' financial oc-
countability ii g h t limit their
autonomy and freedom of expres-
sion, he called "far-fetched" the
idea that accounting procedures
would be used a g a i n s t film
groups
'I don't think there-s ay prs
ct danger tht anybody' sc-i
demic' freedon ine to be
jeopardized,' he said. That i
siiiply not tPeintent: oIor c-
tios in this nmater."
ALHIOLG IHFHE film grop
ier united in hir opositi
the Uniesits sch ing'p-
inei nmet ilitir positimn n a's
iiiiiiig Ii tiorglatino ii llivI
i IOhdifer wideli.
Sno pro 01 'wtac-
v iutah'tv - said TBill 'hom-
soni treasurer of C('ema Guild
Unike othe film groups, Cineiia
Guild' s funds are aireiy chan
neled through the University -
student accounts office
Spokespersons for Friends of
Newsreel and the New World
Film Co-op, on the other hand,
expressed p r e a reservations
about laniisconcssios to the Uiii
versity.
"WE:DON'T want the Univer-
sity to know what we're doing,"
said Dallas Kenney, New World
spokesman, at the Tuesday meet-
ing. "It's none of their fucking
business."
Libyan hijacks
plane to Israel
(Continued from Page 3)
of the Jews in Libya I hve
no asylum except in Israel."a
TOUMI, dressed in a turquoise
suit, said he was not a terrorist
and belonged to no organization.
"I bought the two pistols in
Alexandria, but I made a vow
not to use them against people. I
also bought a compass so they
could not fool me and fly away
from Tel Aviv."
Kawas said he had expected a
weapons check to be made at
Benghazi airport but that there

was none
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THE SUMMER DAILY

Friday, August 17, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY Friday, August 17, 1973

Watergate senators
blast Nixon speech

(Continued from Page i1
month recess of its televised
hearings, is seriously considering
speeding up the investigative pro-
cess when hearings resume in
September.
IN HIS SPEECH, Nixon said:
"The time has come to turn Wat-
ergate over to the courts .- .
The time has come for the rest
of us to get on with the urgent
business of the government."
Gurney echoed that sentiment
when he said, "The committee
hearings have dragged on far
too long and are seriously af-
fecting the ability of the govern-
ment to function. The economy
and our relations with nations
abroad are being seriously ne-
glected by both the executive and
the legislative branches."
Some committee members had
no immediate reaction. Others
expressed disappointment with
what they said was lack of a de-
tailed presidential defense. Some
disagreed sharply that the in-
volvement of seven senators was
causing the legislative process to
bog down or that there was a de-
liberate attempt to implicate the
President.
INITIAL FOREIGN reaction to
President Nixon's Watergate
speech was almost universal in
saying he did not tell the Ameri-
can people enough. Nixon's
Prosecutor sees
VP's accusers
(Crontiinued from Page1
tis of the investigation. Two
dais later Agiew said at a news
confereiice that the allegations
agaiist him were "damned
A Imstise lDpartment spokes
a .i refasEd to conir)m a News
Yuirk 'lins reirt that Rich
ards i tiild Agnew tih t piroseca
tiirs lia i- sloienieiis frm mor
than 20 Mar ylammd iisiiiessiii
is nh-a thmes gas e rash to Agnsi
OCis iv rntiri tfr Iscralir
ga ,erinnient coitracts
hy 'limes quited unmiiumd
ssniccs as siring that Mali.
Inrome Wolff md Atleii (reen
all engmeeriop consalianlr and
assoc'inter of Agneiw, told a
turnii- iover some of the pay-
ments to Agnew during his teii
ure as taltimore County Execu
tire and Maryland governor dur
ing the 1960s. The story also said
Green told prosecutors of con
tinunig to gise kickbacks iii Ag-
new after he became vice presi-
deiit in 1969.
AT THE White House, Deputy
Press Secretary Gerald Warren
refused to say whether President'
Nixon ordered Richardson to out-
line the evidence to Agnew.
He said Nixon met with the at-
torney general the same day as
the Richardson - Agnew meeting,
adding that the White Houseses-
sion was "a private meeting
and it will renmain that way."

strongest support came from the
Soviet press. The influential Ja-
panese newspaper Asahi said in
an editorial it didn't think Amer-
icans were satisfied with the re-
marks on Wednesday.
In his speech Nixon repeated
previous denials and said he was
not involved in or aware of either
the Watergate break-in and bug-
ging or the later cover-up.
He defended his decision not
to release tape recordings of his
conversations with former presi-
dential counsel John Dean and
other staff members who have
been linked to the scandal in
sworn testimony before the Sen-
ate committee.
ASKING FOR the nation's un-
derstanding a n d cooperation,
Nixon said it is clear to him that
the hearings "have become in-
creasingly absorbed in an effort
to implicate the President per-
sonally in the illegal activities
that took place."
"We're just trying to find out
if a crime was committed in the
White House," said Sen Herman
Talmadge (D-Ga.) a committee
member and one of several sena-
tors who took issue with Nixon's
criticism of the committee.
Talmadge renewed a plea for
the President to release the
tapes, said he does not believe
that type of information is privi-
leged.
Ervin said he believes Nixon
has taken a "queer position"
when he said the presidency
would be damaged as an institu-
tion if the tapes of his conversa
tions with aides were released.
"THE CONSTITUTION would
not fall, the presidency wouldn't
be destroyed and the heavens
aomdn'i fall" if the tapes were
reinmised. Es in said.
l\tant lepblmca officeholders
rallied li rappori the President.
Arsustamit Senate Itepublca lend
ci Rbimhct Giifii ut Michign
said- tic informed as a ltes
dciii iensi if ri.epmmmding is
dci tmd 3 iv . w effnctie ii
p smog \~imgt i te iiiis pci-spec
tire -It is hum to turn IWsi
cug-:i ii vr lii ihn courts sri (lie
cotrii rm p i iwith i'rgeiit
husiies '

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Department of Speech Comnicatimn and Theatre
PRESENTS
The University Players' Black Theatre Workshop
A CHILDREN'S AUDIENCE-PARTICIPATION COMEDY
THE MIRRORMAN
by BRIAN WAY
A fun fidled hour for children ages 5-12
THURSDAY, August 16-4:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, August 17-4:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, August 18, 2:00 & 4:00 p.m.
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
CORNER OF STATE AND HURON
Tickets 50c at the door. Grouo rates available.

CINEM A II TONIGHT ONLY
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
THE LADY VANISHES 1938
A lady vanishes on a train e. "An hallucination," a brain specialist
informs a young woman who was dozing in the same compartment, "She
never existed." Skeptical, the young woman investigates . Hitchcock
supreme.
MICHAEL REDGRAVE DAME MAY WHITTY MARGARET LOCKWOOD
AUD A, ANGELL HALL FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 7:30, 9:30 $1.00
SATURDAY: Steve McQueen in Peckinpah's JUNIOR BONNER

The University of Michigan
regnests your presence
at
Je Jecre( -iare.
(in English)
a two-act conedy opera by Cimarosa
The l6th-19th of August, 1973 4
Mendelssohn Theatre,
JOSEF BLATT, conducting
o x l KA THERINE HILGENBERG, stage director
Box Office Hours: -44
4 Aug. 13-15 12:30-5 p.m. Admission $2.504
Aug. 16-1912:30- p.m. for admtional infor-ation call 764-611

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