100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 07, 1973 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-08-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE
Summer Daily

Vol. LXXXIII, No. 56-S

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Tuesday, August 7, 1973

Ten Cents

Eight Pages

Gray says warning to
Nixon got no response

Early

WBI bug probe
WASHINGTON (M - Patrick Gray
insisted yesterday he alerted Presi-
dent Nixon three weeks after the
Watergate break-in that he felt
some White House staffers were act-
ing improperly and illegally. But, he
said the President asked no ques-
tions.
The former acting director of the
FBI said he then concluded he had
been an alarmist.
GRAY CONCLUDED his testimony be-
fore the Senate Watergate committee,
leaving only former Atty. Gen. Richard H
Kleindienst and Asst. Atty. Gen. Henry
Petersen to be questioned before the tired
panel goes into a month's recess with the
rest of Congress.
Under questioning, Gray maintained the
FBI's investigation of the Democratic
headquarters burglary and wiretapping
had been "very, very, very good," even
though it didn't turn up those now alleged
to have been involved in some manner.
While Gray insisted the FBI investiga-
tion was thorough, he admitted some of
the agents might have been overawed by
the positions of some of the people they
were interviewing and that may have led
to some soft questioning.

questioned

Patrick Gray
$10 million
expended on
Nixon homes
WASHINGTON (M) - About $10 million
in federal funds has been spent since 1969
for security and communications installa-
tions and other projects at President Nix-
on's San Clemente and Key Biscayne
ompounds, officials said yesterday.
As the administration gave its fullest
accounting yet of the costs of protecting
and supporting the First Family's homes
, and offices outside of Washington, the
White House promised that Nixon would
reveal within a month all details of his
purchase of California and Florida resi-
dences.
THIS SERIES of announcement yester-
"ay stripped much of the secrecy from
xpayer-financed projects at Nixon's out-
See $10, Page 5
BULLETIN
WASHINGTON (M)-Vice President
Spiro Agnew said yesterday he had
been told he was under investiga-
tion for possible violation of crimi-
nal statutes.
White House and Justice Depart-
ment spokespersons last night con-
firmed that a federal investigation
involving the Vice President is in
progress.
"I have been informed that I am
under investigation for possible vio-
lations of the criminal statutes. I
will make no further comment until
the investigation has been completed,
other than to say that I am inno-
cent of any wrongdoing, that I have
confidence in the criminal justice
system of the United States and that
I am equally confident my innocence
will be affirmed," Agnew said.

TOP OFFICIALS of the FBI didn't be-
lieve that former Nixon canmpaign deputy
Jeb Stuart Magruder and other high ad-
ministration officials could have been in-
volved in the "sordid affair," Gray said,
and added that that belief persisted as
late as last March.
He said FBI leaders even suspected a
Democratic double agent, out to embar-
rass the Republicans, might have been
See GRAY, Page 5

Daily Photo by JIM WALLACE
THIS HORNED, mammalian creature propelled by four legs has suddenly become
very popular and rather valuable due to its scarcity and rising prices of beef.
This situation has caused several of these bovine beasts to be rustled from local
ranches.

Cow rustling hits Washtenaw

County;
By CHRIS PARKS
Ranchers beware! There's a band of no
good, thievin' cattle rustlers loose in
Washtenaw County.
These ornery galoots - totin' vans and
skulking around in the dead of the night-
have gone and rustled themselves 11 head
of cattle in the county in the last two
months.
LT. LAIRD HARRIS-a sheriff's dep-
uty - says a few of the outlaws were
nabbed two weeks ago while they were
slaughtering some farmer's cow right
smack dab in the middle of. his field.
Harris says, however, he doesn't think
these hombres are a part of the big gang
suspected by the Sheriff to be behind the
recent rash of rustlings here and in near-
by Livingston and Jackson counties.
This big gang, Harris believes, has
their own vans for roundin' up the little
doggies. What the deputies can't figure

beef crisis blamed

out is how the outlaws slaughter and sell
their booty.
"WHEN WE figure that out, we'll have
the case solved," Harris says.
Lawmen reckon it's this here beef
shortage that's a-causin' all the trouble.
"I think it's got to be the shortage,"
Harris says. Badmen, he says, steal
things which are "(1) Easy to market,
(2) difficult to trace, and (3) have a high
value."
"MEAT IS ALMOST impossi-
ble to trace," he says, "and now its
price makes it more attractive."
When will law and order be restored to
the county?
Harris says the sheriff's boys are ridin'
the same trails with deputies from Liv-
ingston and Jackson Counties and they
hope to have the varmits in the hooscow
within a couple of weeks.

MEANTIME, are the farmers up at
arms? Is there gonna be a posse? Shucks,
no!
Frankly, most of the boys don't see
what all the commotion's about.
Jack Pascoe of the Michigan Livestock
Exchange in Saline sees "no cause for
alarm," and says most of the area far-
mers feel the same way.
HE SAYS the rustlings are just a few
scattered acts by irresponsible folks and
that the whole kit 'n' kaboodle is being
inflated by all those big-city newspaper
people.
In fact, Pascoe suspects the rustlings
may be no more than the work of a few
greedy ranchers lookin' to collect them-
selves a little of that there insurance
money.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan