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August 01, 1973 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-08-01

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Page Six

THE SUMMER DAILY

Wednesday, August 1, 1973

Page Six THE SUMMER DAILY Wednesday, August 1, 1973

Ervin terms Haldeman s tape
testimony 'counterfeit evidence

(Cotinued from Page 1)
White House aide disclosed their
existence earlier this month.
Sen. Howard Baker (R-Tenn.)
who has sought a compromise to
the battle rather than have it end
in a massive constitutional con-
frontation, asked Haldeman if he
would be "agreeable to bringing
these tapes up here and play
them."
HALDEMAN SAID: "You're
asking me to take a legal posi-
tion different from the Presi-
dent's."
"Would Bob Haldeman as an

individual be a'greeable to bring-
ing those tapes if we could other-
wise procure them," said Baker.
"I would welcome that oppor-
tunity because they would con-
firm what I told you," Haldeman
answered.
QUESTIONED BY Senator Ed-
ward Gurney (R-Fla.) Haldeman
said he could recall nothing from
the tape of the Sept. 15 meeting
to support Dean's assertion that
he told Nixon the Watergate mat-
ter could not be forever "con-
tained."

Bernie's beef nixes Nixon

Dean has said he used that
word and that when Nixon didn't
question it, that meant to Dean
that Nixon knew a cover-up was
under way.
Sen. Daniel Inouye, (D-Hawaii)
questioned Haldeman closely on
security over the Sept. 15 tape
while Haldeman had it out of the
White House.
IN DETAILING his handling of
it, Haldeman disclosed he had
held it at his home for two nights
rather than overnight as he origi-
nally testified. He said he was
alone in his house, saw no evi-
dence of any break-in and did
not helieve the tape had been al-
tered.
Haldeman will resume testi-
mony today, with six more wit-
nesses to follow as the committee
tries to wind up this first phase
of its hearings as soon after the
Aug. 3 Congressional adjourn-
ment as possible.
White House spokesman Gerald
Warren said yesterday that Nix-
on decides who can listen to the
tapes "based on the President's
judgment of who could best as-
sist him in determining the facts
on the Watergate matter without
jeopardizing the confidentiality of
the tapes."
. THE WHITE HOUSE sought

executive privilege for Haldeman
concerning a portion of one meet-
ing Haldeman had not attended,
but the committee denied this
Monday.
Haldeman said Monday the
tapes contained no evidence that
Nixon knew of the cover-up, con-
trary to Dean's testimony ahout
the two meetings.
"I think this is a little planned
action," said Ervin, "in which
the White House allowed Mr. Hal-
deman the use of the tapes which
the White House denies to this
committee and lets Mr. Halde-
man makes the interpretation be-
fore this committee.
IN OTHER Watergate - related
developments:
0 The House Armed Services
Committee voted 33 to 0 to start
contempt of Congress proceedings
against Watergate conspirator
Gordon Liddy, who refused even
to take the swearing-in oath when
he appeared before a subcommit-
tee July 20. The subcommittee is
investigating CIA aspects of the
Watergate affair. Liddy is serv-
ing a contempt sentence for re-
fusing to testify before a federal
grand jury, and is under sentence
for the Watergate break-in.

(Contined fromi Page 1)
uled to end Sept. 12.
Mrs. Nixon's press secretary,
Helen Smith, said White House
chef Henry Haller reported no
problems in his orders. She said
the request turned down by Gold-
stein must have been for the
White House mess, where presi-
dential aides eat.
The menu for Tuesday night's
state dinner for Japanese prime
minister Kakuei Tanaka did not
include beef. It featured duck-
ling, which Miss Smith says is'
served often "because the Presi-

dent happens to like duckling."
GOLDSTEIN is not the only one
with a beef about food prices
these days, however. Housewives
around the country are having
cows about the skyrocketing costs
of meat. Cattle industry people on
the other hand accuse the admin-
istration of trying to horn in on
their profits hy imposing t h e
freeze.
And not a word the administra-
tion can utter seems able to ap-
pease either group.

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PHARMACY

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Harmless looking, isn't it?

KRAF
FROZ

OltCHA
ORANI
BREA
DRIN

All by itself, this innocuous square of paper hardly
seems important. But every week about 170,000
pounds of newsprint comes into Ann Arbor as news-
papers or to be made into newspapers. Well-packed,
that would make a square pile 20 feet on a side and
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the paper is buried and both are forgotten. But the
pile of old newsprint will grow until it no longer can
be ignored.

Fortunately, there is a solution. Old newsprint can
be recycled and made into paper products, thus
sparing the landscape and trees that would other-
wise have been cut. In Ann Arbor the Ecology
Center has a recycling station on South Industrial
Highway, off Stadium, just south of the Coca-Cola
bottlers. It's open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednes-
day thru Saturday.

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