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July 28, 1973 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-28

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Saturday, July 28, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Five

SatudayJuly28,1973THE UMMR DALY Pge I

Pun Plamondon
found guilty by
Cadillac judge

Inmate killed in prison riot

(Continued from Page 1)
GUNFIRE CRACKLED inside
the prison-walls last night when
guards fired on a group of in-
mates seen carrying cans across
a yard near the burning build-
ings, officials said.
One inmate was wounded, ap-
parently in that volley, with a
bullet in the stomach and one in
the right arm, officials said. He
was taken to a hospital after
other prisoners carried him to an
inner perimeter gate.
A prison guard explained the
shooting incident, saying prison
officials feared the inmates car-
ried flammable liquids in the
cans.
THE TROUBLE began as the

inmates attacked Lt. Thomas
Payne and Capt. .C. C. Smith,
near the prison mess hall in the
afternoon, officials said.
Smith and Payne were hos-
pitalized with knife wounds.
Six inmates armed with knives
then seized hostages and called
for support from other prisoners,
officials said.
"COME ON this is a revolu-
tion," one of the inmates shout-
ed on the public address system
which had been seized. "In the
name of Allah, join us, please
join us now solidarity. Come
togetner, black or white. Black
or white are all convicts. Come
join us."
About 1,750 inmates populate

the pison. Officials said about
94. prisoners were locked in their
cells.
Hall said ne understood the in-
mates wished to speak with him..
He said, however, "Unequivocal-
ly, I will not meet with inmates
until the hostages are released
and all inmates are returned to
their cells. I will personally meet
with representatives of the in-
mates within 24 hours after they
return to their cells and release
the hostages."
AS HALL SPOKE, smoke con-
tinued to roll from the prison as
more than a dozen buildings
blazed. At one time, the column
of smoke coold be seen 40 piles
from the prison.

(Continued from Page I)
He appeared to agree with
defense attorney Hugh "Buck"
Davis in noting that the state
police, who played a large part
in the prosecution,dhad been im-
unsure of
key date
Continued ironm Page i)
tion involvement before the Presi-
dent. He said he went to the
Oval Office and told him Ehrlich-
man, H. R. Haldeman, then
Nixon'sHright-handeman, and
Dean were all "indictable."
Another White House assistant,
white-haired Richard Moore, who
testified later at the behest of
Nixon's present staff, backed up
Dean.
tn developments outside the
hearing room:
" Archibald Cox, special Water-
gate prosecutor, told a news con-
ference he was confident the Su-
preme Court would not duck the
issue but would hand down a
ruling on whether Nixon must
comply with Cox' subpoena for
tape recordings and papers.
Cox also said he asked the
White House to give him files on
the International Telephone &
Telegraph Corp. He said the
files are "of utmost importance"
and that the request has been
pending for some time.
" The Senate adopted a pro-
posal to provide up to 10 years in
prison and $25,000 fines for mis-
use of campaign funds donated to
candidates for federal office.

providently thrust into the po-
litical arena" when they were
given the job of pursuing radical
figures like Plamondon.
BUT PETERSON brushed aside
Davis' argument that the only
"threat of accusation made to
Wagner was simply a result of
Plamondon's anger at discover-
ing hard drugs in Wagner's pos-
session.
The judge said both state wit-
ness Bruce Peterson and "the
defendants themselves" confirm-
ed in testimony that Plamondon
and Blazier had in fact tried to
force money from Wagner with
threats.
An RPP spokesperson said the
Rainbow People feel "partially
exonerated" by the verdict, but
indicated that Davis will probab-
ly appeal the decision.
"We don't think trying to ex-
pose someone who has been deal-
ing hard drugs and ripping off
the community is anything that
should be considered illegal," the
spokesperson added.
THE WEEK-LONG trial in-
cluded contradictory testimony
from state witnesses Wagner and
Peterson, and repeated defense
contentions that Plamondon and
Blazier were arrested for politi-
cal reasons.
In his ruling, Peterson called
Wagner "an unscrupulous, im-
moral, and dishonest man" and
expressed much sympathy with
the defendants' plight.
Plamondon offered no com-
ments on the conviction, but Bla-
zier said he "doesn't feel any dif-
ferent' as a convicted extortion-
ist.
HR ADDED, "I just wasted a
lot of time."

CWcud 'Ai en-iCe---
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) CHAPEL (LCMS) 1432 Washtenaw Avenue
801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.) 1511 Washtenaw Avenue Service of Worship-Sundays at
Donald G. Zill, Pastor Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor 9:30 a.m. through Sept. 2.
Spring-Summer Worship - Sun- Sunday at 9:15 a.m. - Worship o *
days at 10:30 a.m. Service. FIRST UNITED METHODIST
* *Sunday at 10:30 a.m. - Bible CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL Study. TION -- State at Huron and Wash.
CH AREW EPISOA 0 0Sermon by the Rev. Fred B.
CHURCH, 306 N. Division BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH Maitland: "B e y o n d the Sacred
1:00 and 10:00 a.m. - Worship O hITPg.
Services. OF CHRIST Page."
* * * 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 Worship Service-10:00 a.m.
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr. Nursery Care:-9:45-11:15 a.m
UNIVERSITY REFORMED Associate Ministers: Dennis R. Church School-10:00 a.m. (thru
CHURCH Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart. Grade 5).
1001 E. Huron 9 a.m.: Morning Prayer. Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM
10:00 a.m.-"Panorama of God's 10 a.m.: Worship Service and and WNRZ (103) FM from 11:00 to
Love"-Rev. Daniel Slabaugh. Church School. noon.

I

Cinema II
TONIGHT ONLY-7:30 and 9:30
SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
directed by FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT (1960) 35 mm
Flipping back and forth from tragic to comic, Truffaut's experi-
mental escapade is an existential essay on life. An innocent
musician is drawn into the underworld. Homage given to Ameri-
can gangster film. Subtitled. Starring Charles Aznovour. Nicole
Berger.

TONIGHT and SUNDAY

so

Vanessa Redgrove Oliver Reed
in KEN RUSSELL'S masterpiece
THE DEVILS 7:1.5
-- plus -
a unique double-feature in Aud. 4
HERBERT BIEBERMAN'S
THE SALT OF THE EARTH
7:00
and GILLO PONTECORVO'S
BATTLE OF ALGIERS
9:30
$1 .25 cost. for either program
a New Morning presenation by friends of newsreel
Modern Languages Auditoriums

cinema guild
PRESTON STURGES WEEKEND
TONIGHT--July 28
DICK POWELL in
CH RISTMAS IN JULY
Two nice, regular kids find it tough getting married when a
bunch of scatterbrained businessmen get in their way. The film
was d knockout in 1940.
"As a creator of rich and human comedy, Mr. Sturges is closing
fast on the heels of Frank Capra."-New York Times
8 and 10p.m. ARCHITECTURE AUD. $1.00

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