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July 27, 1973 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-27

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THE
Summer Daily

Vol. LXXXIII, No. 49-S

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, July 27, 1973.

Ten Cents

Twelve Pages

uition Read and weep
By DAN BIDDLE President Robben Fleming said he "deeply re- STUDENT FEE RATES PER ACADEMIC TERM
those among us who eat food, travel in gretted" having to raise tuition to unearthly lev-
lannh e.uinsited taten RESIDENT '72-'73 '73-'74 Increase

For
ane i

gasonne-powerea venicles, and pay tuition to the
University, 1973-74 is going to be a very rough
year.
Phase IV will probably push gas to 70 cents a
gallon, and hamburger to $2 a pound. But if that
isn't bad enough, "Phase 24" - the University's
newly approved 24 per cent tuition hike - may
send us from the registration lines to the bread-
lines.
THE BIG BOOST is complex in its technicali-
ties but simple in its meaning: the Supreme
Court's June 18 decision to ax the old six-month
nonenrollment residency requirement, topped off
by ever-present inflation, will cost students any-
where from 15 to 30 per cent higher tuition.
The Regents - the eight people who make the
final decisions around here - approved the re-
cord hikes in a special telephone poll yesterday.

,11V .110aG VaV~ y LIt 1C U111J111
had "no other recourse" if Michigan is to remain
a "top notch" university.
AND THE ACTUAL figures are certainly re-
grettable. (See chart.) For example, if you're an
in-state freshman, semester tuition will leap from
$348 to $400. Or if you're a non-resident junior,
your fee for the whole year will climb a whop-
ping $540, to $2800 from last year's $2260.
Graduates will get the worst deal: a 30 per cent
hike in most categories. Resident medical stu-
dents who paid $1260 last year will now shell out
$1600 to spend another year at this top-notch in-
stitution.
Administration officials echoed Fleming's view
that the tuition increase is "our only choice," and
offered complex explanations for the size of the
hike.
See RECORD, Page 9

Freshman-Sophomore
Junior-Senior
Graduate
Candidacy (Graduate, without courses)
Medicine & Dentistry
Public Health
Law
MBA (Graduate Business)
NON-RESIDENT
Freshman-Sophomore
Junior-Senior
Graduate
Candidacy (Graduate, without courses)
Medicine & Dentistry
Public Health
Law
MBA (Graduate Business)

$ 348
348
420
315
630
610
475
420
1,130
1,130
1,180
315
1,270
1,250
1,200
1,180

$ 400
452
548
336
800
780
620
548

$ 52
104
128
21
170
170
145
128

1,300
1,400
1,420
336
1,600
1,580
1,440
1,300

170
270
240
21
330
330
240
120

Nixon def'es demands
for presientia tapes
Senate to sue; Cox goes to court
WASHINGTON (;P) - President Nixon
yesterday defied demands from bulb Con-
gress and the government's special prose-
cutor for Watergate-related tape record-
jogs and documents. The Senate Water-r
gate committee voted unanimously to sue .....:: Y-:
him; and prosecutor Archibald Cox chal-
lenged him in court.:.
Thus, an issue which began with a
simple burglary 13 months ago was
launched into an unprecedented constitu-
tional test of strength certain to climax
before the U.S. Supreme Court.
NIXON SAID through a White House
spokesman that he would abide by a
definitive ruling by the high court and
expressed confidence that the eventual
decision would uphold him.
Meanwhile at the Watergate committee
hearing, John Ehrlichman testified that
there was another White House "plumb-
ers" unit investigation which cannot be
made public.
Ehrlichman, a former top Presidential
aide, said revealing the operation would
compromise national security.
THE DAY'S EVENTS began to unfold
when Nixon notified the Senate Watergate
committee by letter that he would not;
comply with the committee's two sub-
poenas. They demanded that he turn over f
his tape recordings, memoranda and docu
ments bearing on the Senate's investigation
of last year's wiretapping and burglary at
the Watergate headquarters of the Demo-
cratic National Committee.
Nixon also wrote U.S. District. Court
Judge John Sirica, in answer to a sub-
poena from Cox, that he would net release oto
SEN. HOWARD BAKER (R-Tenn.), left, and Sen. Sam Ervin raise their hands to signal an affirmative vote as the Senate Wat
ergate committee unanimously voted to ask the court to make the White House produce the White House tapes and other docu
See NIXON, Page 10 - ments. In other words, the committee voted to sue the President.

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