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July 21, 1973 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-21

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Saturday, July 21, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Ninew

THE SUMMER DAILY Page Nine

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Publilsh a Newsp aper
* We meet new people
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" We debate vital issues
* We drink 5c Cokes
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Nixon will not release tapes;
Strachan implicates Haldeman

(Continued from Page 1)
AT THE White House, deputy
press secretary Gerald Warren
said, "You can. assume the Pres-
ident has pretty well concluded
what the letter will contain," re-
ferring to the letter Nixon plans
to write this week end to Sen.
Sam-Ervin (D-N.C.), about the
committee's demand for the
tapes.
"There is no change in the
President's basic decision stated
in his July 7 letter," Warren
added, in which Nixon informed
Ervin he would neither make
any presidential documents
available nor appear before the
committee under any circum-
stances. The White House regards
the tapes as presidential docu-
ments. -
Other White House sources
confirmed privately that Nixon
would refuse the Ervin commit-
tee's request, thus dashing the
senators' hopes of avoiding a
constitutional tug-of-war that
could well go to the Supreme
Court for settlement.
IN HIS LETTER, Nixon was
expected to suggest a date for a
previously agreed meeting with
Ervin to discuss the situation.
The meeting, delayed because of
the President's week-long hospi-
talization for viral pneumonia,
seemed to be the only remaining
chance for a compromie to be
reached.
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. Although Sen. Howard Baker,
(R-Tenn.), vige chairman of the
Watergate committee, said he
was "hopelessly optimistic" for a
way out of the' impasse, most of
the six other committee mem-
bers indicated they believed Nix-
on was not prepared to back down.
Sen. Herman Talmadge, (D-
Ga.), predicted that if Nixon
persists in his refusal, the result
probably would be a unanimous
committee vote to subpoena the
tapes relating to Watergate.
In that event, the Supreme
Court would most likely have to
decide whether the recordings-
or any presidential material
dealing with political campaigns
- are properly covered by exec-
utive privilege under the doctrine
of separation of powers, which
Nixon has invoked.
IN OTHER Watergate-related
developments:
" Robert Mardian, former as-
sistant attorney general, told

the Watergate committee that
President Nixon was so concern-
ed about White House security
leaks in mid-1971 that he ex-
pressed' fears about world peace
and his own ability to govern.
* Despite rumors that the
heretofore mute Watergate con-
spirator G. Gordon Liddy, might
be ready to crack, Liddy refused
even to be sworn in before an
armed services intelligence pan-
el looking into possible involve-
ment of the CIA in the Watergate
affair.
* Sen. Carl Curtis (R-Neb.)
called on the Watergate commit-
tee to investigate alleged wire-
tapping of Vice President Spiro
Agnew by the Johnson adminis-
tration during the 1968 campaign.
. Ashland Oil, one of the larg-
est oil companies in the country,
has 'voluntarily acknowledged an
illegal $100,000 cash contribution
to President Nixon's re-election
campaign.

Senate passes bill
limiting war powers

(Continued from Page 1)
MUSKIE CALLED IT "a mat-
ter of tactical judgment," not-
ing that advocates of the Aug.
15 compromise on cutting o f f
U.S. bombing of Cambodia had
used a similar argument in the
Senate last month.
Sen. William Fulbright (D-
Ark.) suggested President Nix-
on's threat earlier this week to
veto the bill applied only to the
House version. Muskie said, How-
ever, that Sens. Barry Goldwater
(R-Ariz.) and Robert Griffin (R-
Mich.) had made clear the chal-
lenge applied to the Senate bill
too.

STAND OUT ...
from the Crowd
Make good use
of your spare time,
working on and
learning about
newspaper production.
JOIN THE DAILY

OPEN AIR CONCERT
"DETROIT"
Saturday, July 21
South Lyon Football Field
Pontiac Trail & 9 Mile
General Admission-$2.00

EAGLETON, in arguing for his
amendment, said the first Amer-
ican involvement in Laos came
when CIA advisers were sent
there, and it was never subject to
congressional approval.
The Senate's war powers bill
is identical to one it passed last
year 68 to 16 but which died in
conference.
The House at that time approv-
ed a less sweeping bill requiring
presidential consultation w i t h
Congress but which did not pre-
vent the president from deploy-
ing troops.
MEANWHILE, William Colby
will be recalled for questioning
on his nomination to head the
CIA following charges he played
"a despicable part" in the pacifi-
cation program in South Viet-
nam, Sen. Stuart Symington (D-
Mo.) announced yesterday.
Symington, acting chairman of
the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee, said "we have to have
Colby back to discuss matters be-
ing laid out in good democratic
fashion before Congress and the
people."
The unprecedented public crit,
icism of Colby before a congres-
sional committee was led by Rep.
Robert Drinan (D-Mass.) He
charged the nominee with being
the "chief architect" of a cam-
paign to squelch all capable poli-
tical opposition to South Viet-
namese President Nguyen Van
Thieu from 1968 to 1971.
Drinin accused Colby w i t h
responsibility for "sweeping in-
justices done to thousands of
Vietnamese" and urged that his
nomination be delayed.

cupch OP4 e4te
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1511 Washtenaw Avenue 801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St) 1001 E. Huron
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor Donald G. Zill, Pastor 10:30 a.m.-Service on Sunday.
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Service. Spring-Summer Worship - Sun-F*U E T*
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S:00 and 10:00 a.m. - Worship 423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 Home?"
Services. Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr. Worship Serice-10:00 a.m.
* * * Associate Ministers: Dennis R. N-'rsery Care-9:45-11:15 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart. Church School-10:00 a.m. (thru
1432 Washtenaw Avenue 9 a.m.: Morning Prayer. Grade 5).
Service of Worship-Sundays at 10 a.m.: Worship Service and Broadcast on WNRS (1290 AM
9:30 a.m. through Sept. 2. Church School. and WNRZ (103) FM, 11:00-noon.

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