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July 19, 1973 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight-S

THE SUMMER DAILY

Thursday, July 19, 1973

Local fair fun for artists

Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
Carol Furtado at work
Area weaver Carol Furtado is shown working at her Scandinavian style loom. She is one of many local crafts people displaying their work
at the art fair.
SUMMER BARGAIN DAYS
NEW from COLUMBIA & EPIC,
i6i
Of 0
KE321 34- KC32280--
SLY & THE FAMILY STONE PAUL SIMON
f -
DURING
BARGAIN
DAYS
KC32400- KE32140--
CHICAGO VI BECK, BOGERT & APPICE
$2.391
PRICES SLASHED on 1000's of LP S $2.19
USIC OF ALL KINDS $1.98
ROCK-POP-CLASSICS-JAZZ-FOLK 69 ]
isc unt records
300 S. State 1235 S. University
HOURS: Mon-Fri. 9:30-9:00 (S. State) Sat. 9:30-6:00, Sun. 12-5
10-10 (S. University)

By DEBBIE GOOD
Artists really enjoy exhibiting
at the Ann Arbor fairs. The infor-
mal atmosphere and the oppor-
tunity to meet their customers
face to face make it a most en-
joyable way to sell their work.
"I just like the atmosphere of
the street fair," says photogra-
pher Sharon Campbell. "Being a
country girl, I know and like that
feeling of excitement." Camp-
bell and her husband Duke will
be displaying scenic pictures
from the sea coasts, Canada and
a good number taken in Michi-
gan.
BOTH ARE FINISHING their
doctorates and find photography
provides a needed break from
their studies. "You need this to
maintain a balance when work-
ing on a doctorate and photog-
raphy is a really good outlet for
us."
The fair is more than an op-
portunity to sell artwork, says
Carol Furtado, who will be dis-
playing her work with fibers.
"The fair gives you some feed-
back. It's important to see how
your work affects people. You
don't get that in the galleries. All
you get is a check, hopefully, but
you miss out on people's expres-
sions when they look at what
you've done."
Furtado's work is mostly ex-
perimental design with natural
fibers. While weaving is not a
highly popular medium right
now, Furtado says, "the colors
and textures of natural yarns
gives the medium great creative
possibilities. The colors get me
super-excited."
NOT EVERYONE is so enthusi-
astic, however. There are prob-
lems associated with open air ex-
hibits.
"It's hectic and it's crowded
and that's a problem if you want
a nice display. People grab
things a lot and mss up your
work. I wish they wouldn't do
that," says Furtado.
Most artists agree, however,
that the fair has held onto its
excellent reputation because of
its high standards for entries,
which is especially important
when people are buying art.
"PEOPLE KNOW that entries
are judged by people with train-
ing in art, so they can have con-
fidence in what they're buying,"
said Joan Beaver, a silk screen
printer.
Beaver works mostly with im-
pressionistic design in silk-
screening.
In past years, the fair has been
imbalanced in terms of the as-
sortment of media shown but
"this year promises to be bal-
anced," Beaver says, "there
won't be a potter in every tent."
MOMA
MAINSTREAMS OF
MICHIGAN ART
SR. BARBARA CERVENKA
JOHN KEHOE
KEIICHI HAYAN
CLIFF McCHESNEY
GUY PALAZZOLA
MARY JANE BIGLER
SUSANNE STEPHENSON
CLantern Gallery

Miller-MomnShops-76 -0707
Open Tues.-Fri. 10-5
Sot. 9-I

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