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July 19, 1973 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, July 19, 1973

THE SUMMER DAITLY

Poge Five-S

U' museums tempt viewers

By ERIC SCHOCH
When the time arrives this year
when you sit back, tired of every-
thing that you have been doing
the last few weeks, and decide
that there is nothing to do today,
that will be the day to go to one
of the University's three major
museums: the Museum of Nat-
ural History, Kelsey Museum of
archeology, and the Museum of
Art.
Natural History
Museum
The museum of natural his-
tory, located across the street
from the C.C. Little building, is
the largest at the University, and
is often visited by schoolchildren
from the Detroit metropolitan
The major exhibits on the sec-
ond, third and fourth floors stay
relatively the same, with some
additions from time to time. The
second floor features fossils and
evolution, the third floor looks at
Michigan wildlife, and the fourth
floor exhibits on minerals. In-
dian culture, the planetarium,
the Hall of Life and TAM, the
Transparent Anatomical Mani-
kin.
Public showings of TAM, an
automated life-size model used
to demonstrater human anatomy,
and planetarium programs take'
place on the weekends, with a
charge of 25 cents.
The most popular exhibits are
probably those dealing with fos-
sils and evolution, because they
include exhibits of those fasci-
nating beasts, the dinosaurs.
Towering above the visitor's
heads are the bones of the vi-
cious allosaurus. Though not a
dinosaur, the bones of the mas-
todon are just as impressive.
MANY OF THE cases are
filled with models of various pre-
historic scenes from various
ages, all realistically detailed, as
CANBERRA (UPI) - Twice
as many migrants are becoming
Australian citizens as a year ago,
Immigration Minister Al Crassby
said in a report to parliament.
Crassby said 3,152 aliens became
citizens in January, 1973, com-
pared with 1,525 last year. For-
mer Greek citizens led the way
to Australian citizenship, follow-
ed by Italians and Yugoslavs, he
said.

are scenes depicted on the other
floors. The diagrams and expla-
nations for all the exhibits are
not only informative but sim-
ple enough that anyone who reads
them carefully may feel like an
expert when leaving.
Perhaps the most enjoyable
way of touring the natural his-
tory museum is to follow around
one of the many visiting groups
of young children that regularly
pile out of yellow school buses to
invade the museum.
Young museum guides, usually
University students, do their best
to give complete, if simple ex-
planations of the various exhib-
its. Following these tours around
can not only be informative, but
amusing as well. The guides try
their best to keep the young-
sters interested, and in the pro-
cess often come up with some in-
teresting answers from the kids.
Recently, one guide patiently
explained that once long ago fish
were the most important "ami-
mals" in the world. What are the
most important animals nowa-
days, he queried.
One bright young girl had the
information. "Horses," she said.
Museum of Art
One of the most fascinating as-
pects of the art museum is that it
changes continually, not only as
individual works are changed,
but also as new exhibitions of
artists or art genres are pre-
sented. The museum of art, like
-the natural history museum, is
not something oply worth seeing
once, but a continuing enterprise
that almost demands repeat
visits.
The first floor of the museum
has contemporary works of every
conceivable type on display, with
two side rooms filled with art
from the Orient.
THE MAIN attraction of the
museum for many people, how-
ever, is the second floor, where
major temporary exhibitions are
displayed. Such exhibitions, just
to name a few, have included a
collection of works by artists of
the G e r m a n Expressionism
school, a series of moving pho-
tographs by Walker Evans (popu-
larly known for, among other
achievements, his photo-illustra-
tions of the book Let Us Now
Praise Famous Men), a collec-
tion of patriotic posters urging

Americans on during World War
I, andan exhibition on "The Cult
of Krishna."
Many students see the art mu-
seum only after enrolling in an
History of Art course. But don't
wait until then, just go to look
around and enjoy the fact that
you don't have to write a paper
on what you see.
Kelsey Museum
The Kelsey Museum features
archaeology and is the smallest

of those listed here. Located
across the street from Angell
Hall on State St., the exhibits
here deal largely with artifacts
from the civilizations of ancient
Greece, Rome, and Egypt.
Though not as elaborate as the
Natural History museum, Kelsey
offers its visitors a mummy on
loan from the Metropolitan Mu-
seum of Art in New York, the
Egyptian Book of the Dead, a
doll house from Egypt during

the Roman period, and various
examples of ancient arts, crafts,
and building materials.
Accompanying each display are
explanations which offer even the
least - interested viewer insights
into the cultural mores and tra-
ditions of those civilizations and
periods.
Though not something that the
average student makes use of
every day, University museums
can provide an occasional pleas-
ant afternoon for most anyone.

R ~s Bargain Days
WHEN WE HAVE A
BARGAIN DAY SALE-
We Have Real Bargains!
The price on virtually every item in our stores
has been reduced and .. .
If You've Been looking for Anything Photographic
Now is the time to Buy!
3 DAYS ONLY-Thurs. thru Sal.-July 19-21

NEW WORLD FILM COOP-
PRESNTS--

The Rolling Stones
GMME
SHELTER
THURSDAY & FRIDAY (July 19 &20)
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
$1.25 (central U. of M. campus) 8:15 & 10 P.M.

Campus Village
Store
Street Art Fair
STORE HOURS:
Wed.-Thurs.-Fri.
9aOm, to 10 P.M.
Sat. 9-5:30
1115 South Univ.
Phone 665-6101

CAMERA
I SHOPS
1115 S. UNIVERSITY-345 S. MAIN
Phone 665-6101-Phone 761-8596

Main Street
Store
DOWNTOWN
ANN ARBOR
PHOTOGRAPHIC FAIR
r
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
V PRICE
SoTE HOURS:
Wed. & !ri.
9 a.m. to9 P.M.
Thurs. & Sat.
9 am. to 5.30
3055S. Main St.
Phone 761-8596

I'

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