100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 13, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, July 13, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Nne

Fridoy, July 13, 1973 THE SUMMER DAILY Poge Nine

Study
By DICK BARNES
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON - A second
congressional committee s a i d
yesterday it will investigate ex-
penditure of nearly $1.9 million
in federal funds at President
Nixon's private homes in Cali-
fornia and Florida.
The chairman of another com-
mittee has already concluded that
the expenditures for security in-
stallations and operations were
proper.
TESTIMONY SHOWED, how-
ever, that government revamp-
ing and improvement of presi-
dential residences in the name
of security is an open-ended ob-
ligation with no legal limit on
costs or numbers of houses.
Controversy has been stirred
by recent disclosure that the
government spent $1.33 million
on improvements and equipment
at Nixon's Key Biscayne, Fla.,
and San Clemente, Calif., c o m-
pounds. Another $554,321 h a s
been spent on operations and
maintenance at Key Biscayne.
The Secret Service has said
it ordered nearly all the work
done for security reasons. The
General Services Administration
has said it ordered most of the
rest, and that Nixon personally
ordered none of it.
THE WORK included replace-
ment of landscaping damaged
during installation of security
gear, a new heating system, of-
fice furniture and swiming pool
maintenance equipment.
Rep. Jack Brooks, (D-Tex.),
chairman of the House Govern-
Bombers
to leave
SE Asia
WASHINGTON () - The Unit-
ed States will start pulling B52
bombers out of the Southeast
Asia war this weekend, Nixon ad-
ministration sources reported
yesterday.
Departure of 13 B52s from Guam
apparently will mark the begin-
ning of a gradual withdrawal of
at least half of the 200 heavy
bombers committed to the war
before the Aug. 15 cutoff of all
U.S. military operations in Indo-
china.
THERE MAY be no announce-
ment of the first B52 pullback to
the United States.
Administraiton strategists re-
portedly believe public disclosure
of the movement might undercut
diplomatic efforts to work out an
early cease-fire between the
Cambodian government and
North Vietnamese-backed insurg-
ents.
It also might tend to undercut
the credibility of President Nix-
on's warning that he would ask
Congress for continued bombing
beyond Aug. 15 if he finds that
necessary to achieve peace in
Cambodia.
Although about 400 smaller U.S.
fighter-bombers engage in attacks
against insurgents against Cam-
bodia, the B52 operations have
been the most controversial be-
cause of their huge bombloads
and the massive destruction they
can cause.
B52 sorties, costing up to $30,-
000 each, are much more expen-
sive than flights of tactical fight-
er bombers, which run to about
$6,600 apiece.
Daily Official Bulletin

Friday, July 13
DAY CALENDAR
Commission for Women: Turna-
bout", slide show on male-female role
rever-sals, N. Campus Commons Via.
im.; N5330NHonp.; HSRI 1st floor rm
off Lib.; 12:10-12:40 pm.
Audio-Visual Summer Films: Wise-
man Documentary, MLB Aud. 3, 7 pm
International Folk Dance: WAB, 8-11
am.
Astronomy Visitor's Night: Dr. O. C.
Mohler, "Sunspots," Apollo 17 movie
lellows, 5046 Angell Hall; Observatory
open.

probes Nixon homes

ment Activities subcommittee,
said that panel will probe se-
curity aspects of the improve-
ments.
'We fully recognize the need
to provide extensive protection
for the security of the President.
However, it is essential that ex-
penditures made in the name of
security be reasonably related to
that purpose," he said.
JAMES ROWLEY, director of
the Secret Service, told a Hause
Appropriations subcommittee on
June 27 that more sophisticated
security equipment and a broad-
er protection law have !een
available since 1968.
Thus, he said, procedures gov-
erning Nixon residence security
have differed in degree, but not
in general procedure, from those
of recent previous presidencies.
Subcommittee chairman T o m
Steed (D-Okla.) expressed ap-
proval of the expenditures at the
hearing.
DESPITE REQUESTS from the
White House, the General Serv-
ices administration, which con-
tracts or performs the actual
work, said it is unable to pro-
duce cost figures for improve-
ments made at private homes of
Presidents Johnson, Kennedy, or,
Eisenhower.
"There just aren't any statis-
tics available," said GSA Ad-
ministrator Arthur Sampson. "We

have tried . . . You must ap-
preciate the fact that financial
records have a short life, they
are usually ultimately put on a
tape of some sort and retrieving
information is almost impossible
without doing months and months
of work."
The open-ended authorization
for security improvements comes
from a combination of three
sources:
-LONG-STANDING legislation
which authorizes the Secret Ser-
vice "to protect the person of the
president ."
-Congressionally approved lan-
guage incluled annually since
1963 in the GSA's budget appro-
priation for operating expenses
for the Public Buildings Service.
It provides "that this appro-
priation shall be available to pro-
vide such fencing, lighting, guard
booths and other facilities on pri-
vate or other property not in
government ownership or control
as may be appropriate to enable
the U.S. Secret Service to per-
form its protective functions ..."
-Legislation passed June 6,
1968, providing "hereafter, when
requested by the director of the
U.S. Secret Service, federal de-
partments and agencies, unless
such authority is revoked by the
president, shall assist the Secret
Service in the performance of its
protective duties . ."

REP. EDWARD ROYBAL (13-
Calif.) asked the GSA general
counsel 'William Casselman: "If
the President saw fit to have a
home in every state, then you
would be doing the same thing
in every state of the union. Is
that correct?"
"I think you reach a point of
reasonability," said Casselman.
"I cannot imagine a situation
where the President goes around
establishing homes willy-nilly ..."
BUT THERE is no legal limit.
When a president retires, the
Secret Service must continue pro-
tection wherever he chooses to
live.
Asked if Nixon could maintain
both residences after he left
office, Rowley said, "We wouldn't
have any control over that," and
acknowledged his agency would
have to maintain protection at
both.
THE AGENCY also maintains
protection for the widows of Tru-
man, Eisenhower and Johnson,
the children of Kennedy and Nix-
on's children.
In the case of the Kennedy
youngsters, Lilburn Bogs, depu-
ty Secret Service director, said:
"It is quite dificult to meet the
protective requirements and the
wishes of their mother, which
makes it a very low key _re-
quiremeft. We are just not al-
lowed . . . by virtue of the

mother . . . to use the sophisti-
cated equipment we have been
allowed to use ,elsewhere."
Since Kennedy's widow remar-
ried, she is no longer, u n d e r
Secret Service protection. But
the Kennedy children remain pro-
tected until age 18.
ROWLEY AND SAMPSON are
agreed that some of the install-
ations made for security reasons
are in fact improvements to the
property - for example, a $13,500
heating system at San Clemente
which replaced a unit the Secret
Service said was unsafe.
But Sampson said there was no
precedent to bill an outgoing pre-
sident for any improvements that
might be left behind on his pro-
perty.
Sampson said it also should be
noted that, "for example, Gettys-
burg will eventually be a national
park and the LBJ Ranch will be-
come a national park.
"WHAT YOU are really doing
is investing in something for the
future heritage of the country at
the same time."
Eisenhower's residence was at
Gettysburg, Pa.
Thus far, no provision h a s
been made for establishment 3f
a national park at Nixon's San
Clemente or Key Biscayne resi-
dence compounds, portions of
which are owned by friends of
the President.

FRIDAY 13th SALE
JULY 13th-ONE DAY ONLY

13 HITS
at
each
" ARETHA FRANKLIN
Hey Now Hey
" J. GIELS-Bloodshot
" LED ZEPPELIN
Houses of the Holy
" MORT SAHL
Sing of Watergate
* COMMANDER CODY
Country Casanova
" DAN HICKS & HIS
HOT LICKS
Last Train
" DAVID BOWIE
Aladdin Sane
" JOHN DENVER
Farewell Andromeda
" GRACE SLICK
Baron Von Toll Booth
" NILLSSON
A Little Schmillson in
the Night
" JOE WALSH
The Smoker You Drink
" JOHN KAY
My Sporting Life
" CAROLE KING
Fantasy
ALL Stereo
Tapes On Sale

I NEW from COLUMBIA & EPIC

:}:
i
x
3
{

iEpicY

PAUL SIMON5309

These 13 Best-Selling Labels
COLUMBIA-EPIC-PRESTIGE-FANTASY
WARNER BROTH ERS-REPRISE-CAPRICORN-STAX
ANGEL-CAPITOL-PHILIPS-MERCURY--VOLT
Every LP on these $4 19
$3 5.98 LIST 13great labels on sale! 6.98 LIST

dis.count records
300 S. State 1235 S. University
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9:30-9:00 1S. State} Sat. 9:30-6:00, Sun. 12,5
10-10 (S. Universityl

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan