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July 12, 1973 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-12

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Thursdoy,} July 12, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Eleven

YANCEY, NICKLAUS ONE SHOT BEHIND

Wei
win
a hx
ican
of t
Cha
Tn
man
to
thre
lishe
clOs
men
Ni
ed
whe

Weiskopf leads
ROON, Scotland (Mt - T o m their worst. Conditions had bet- 71- the only others
skopf conquered chill, gusty tered only slightly when Weis- break par 72 on the 7,
ds off the Firth of Clyde with kopf played in the late after- of gorse and heather, th
ard-won 68 and led an Amer- noon. thickets, worry andv
domination of the first-round Lanky Johnny Miller, who scor- make up the Old Co
he 102nd British Open Golf ed a surprise victory in the U.S. Troon.
mpionship yesterday. Open only a month ago, was "Well, I beat her one
he tall and sometimes moody alone with a 70 and made it an how," Crampton said. "
who suddenly has come in- all-American quartet at the top take me every day."
his golfing maturity w i t h of the international field of 153 Wadkins and Cramp
e victories this season, estab- arrayed for this oldest of all the tied with three Britons
ed a one-stroke lead over world's championships, Neil Coles, Peter Butler
e friend Bert Yancey and Lanny Wadkins, a stubby little er Wilcock.
lacing Jack Nicklaus. sophomore on the American tour, Arnold Palmer, the 4
icklaus and Yancey fashion- and Australian Bruce Crampton, living legend who won f
their 69s early in the day the season's leading money win- in 1962 the last time it
n the wind and cold were at ner, were in a group of five at ed at Troon, and skinny
Chi Rhe wid a in

able to
064 yards
istles and
woe that
urse at
day any-
She won't
pton were
s, veteran
r and Pet-
3-year-old
his crown
was play-
little Chi
n 5o zap

j
imey
of the world's premiere s h o t-
makers.
Lee Trevino, the brash and
brassy buy who has won this
title the last two years, had to
chip in for a birdie on the last
hole to salvage a 75.
Tony Jacklin of England, a
former British and American
open titleholder, was tight and
testy after his 75 and admitted
he was ""very disappointed."
South African Gary Player had
a 76, four over par.
But Peter Oosterhuis, the
young Briton who finished third
in the Masters, and Tommy Aa-
ron, the winner at Augusta, Ga.,
had even more problems. They
struggled home with matching
80s.
Gene Sarazan, the incredible
71-year-old squire who won this
title in 1932, spiced the- day's
activity with a hole-in-one on
the 126 yard eighth -"hole, called
'the postage stamp" because of
its tiny green.

Open
The stocky' little man, w h o
first came to Troon to compete
in the 1923 British open -a half
century ago - put the ball in the
cup on the fly in what he says
will be his last competitive ap-
pearance. He finished with a 79.
Weiskopf started with a burst,
taking birdies on three of his
first five holes, but finished on a
low note with his only bogey on
the final hole.
He hooked his drive - "My
concentration was broken by
some kids rustling paper," he
said - was short in two and
failed to get it up and down
for a par that would have given
him a two-stroke margin.
The hard-hitting winner of
more than $1,%Ot00 in his last six
starts missed from three feet on
the first hole, then ran home
birdie putts of 15 and 18 feet on
the next two. He failed to birdie
the par 5 fourth hole, but dropped
a 35 footer for a deuce on the
fifth.

Mixed League Bowling
Sign Up Now! Win a Free Game
40c per game M Pin Bowling
MICHIGAN UNION BILLIARDS
Open 11 a.m. Mon.-Sat. - 1 p.m. Sun.
-7' ---"DOU BL E
- FEATURE!
1114 5. UNiVERSITY
DIAL 668-6416
FOR SHOWTIMES
§1TVL
ROBERT RYAN
WILLIAM HOLDEN
EDMOND o'BRIEN
BEN JOHNSON
WARREN OATES
-and mare in the ast-film
A TOUGH M OYVI E THAT we tern that ade Peckinpsh
REVIVED THE CAR CHASE. famous for his stylized "vio-
ence

- n rcarguez were in a gru
at 72.
The Old Course, however, was
made double tough by a wind
that shifted 180 degrees from its
prevailing direction. And she
took her toll among the ranks
Scottish scooters
a-amateur
Tom weiskopf 33-35-68
Columbus, Ohio
JsackNcklas , 33-36-69
xorth Palm e nash,Fra.
Bert Yancey 30-39-69
Pem"no Beach. Fla.
Neil Coltes 34-37-71t
Lniiiand
Meter Butler 34-37-71
Britain
Lanny Wadkins 35-36-71
C'emnions N.C
Peter Wilcock 33-38-71
itain
a-DavidRs 5 el 36-36-72
ritain '
VincentB aker 34-35-72
Chi Chi Rodriguez 36-34-72
Puerto Rico
Bruce 1)eviin °7-35-72
.1tstraiisa
tArnold Palmer 35-37-72
Latrobe, Pa.
Daidi Dunk t,35-37-72

l
L
C
l
a
r
k
Y

US tinkers work
A~uccablrch i~ilc

" rtain
INTER-CHANGE:
Directed Analysis a n d Self-
Treatment of Problems of Ad-
iustment to Academic Life
F O C U S Proqram, Counseling
Services, O f f i c e of Student
Services
Inter-Change is for students
who hove problems rwlating to
academic tileespecially diffi-
cultinq in studying.
IT IS NO COST
The Inter-Change group wll
teach a self-change technology
based on the principles of hu-
man behavior modification.
The group will meet 14 times
on Mondays and Fridays, July
16 through August 26. The
meeting time will be 1:00-3:00
Interested students s h o u l d
coal Terry Boothwman, 764-8437
for an interviews.

t1t. AVIV U' --Americans
nt-de a cle-tn sweep of the swim-
si)g competition in the second
day of the ninth Maccabiah
Games yesterday, winning 13 °
18 nedals, and five top hotnors.
Two more Maccabiah records
set by Olympic ace Mark Spitz
came tumbling off the record
books as the Americans took a
comtmading lead in the overalt
tiotal if medals won so far in
the Jewish Olympics.
Roy A b r a in o w i t z, 19,
if Princeton, N.J.. who repre-
sented South Africa at the, last
Maccabiah Games in 1969, shat-
tered Spitz's record in the 400-
meter men's individual medley
SHOP AT
Folletts
for TEXTBOOKS
and SUPPLIES and
SAVE

'_ A W0
Prints and Sculpture
July 11-29
at the
Union Gallery
Located on the first floor,
MICHIGAN UNION
Mr. Wolfe will be present at a recep-
tion for him on Friday evening, July
20, 7-10 p.m. at The Gallery.
GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday-Saturday 10-5,
Closed Sun. and Mon:

H AT'FS A
STEAK9.4

by neorly 10 seconds, going the
distnce in 4:51.4.
'Michael Cook, 21, of Rancho
M.irgeC, ('lif., broke his second
Spitz record in the 200-meter
mien's freesyle with a tiieoe f
two wiites flat, trimming 2.7
seconds off the Olympic super-
st-r's time in 1960.
Sweden's Anita Zarnowiecki
h-tn been a st-ir attraction of the
svimming competition, taking
home a gold medal in all three
events she entered. On 'Tuesday
she won the 200-meter backstroke
and the 100-meter freestyle, and
yesterday she added the gold
medal in the 200-meter free-
style.
Andy Lehner and Wendy Pas-
kin of the United States won the
men's and women's 100 meter
butterfly.
Lehner of Caldwell, N.J., and
USC, won the men's 100 butter-
fly in 51.3 seconds, with Sam
Franklin of Tustin, Calif., and
Jeff Latzo 0f Tempe, Ariz., sec-
ond and third, respectively.
Miss Paskin, of Encino, Ca-
lif., also led a U.S. sweep in the
women's 100 butterfly. She was
timed in a Games record of
1:07.6 in beating Ronda Dickson
of Woodltod Itills, Calif., and
Barbara Sapiozik of Skokie, Ill.
The U. S. women also won the
400-meter freestylo rel-y.
iA
From Englard
FRI. r& SAT.
MraA R'
and
SAT. & SU.
with
Aly Boin
1411 Full STREET

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