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June 16, 1973 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-16

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Saturday, June 16, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Five

Commitment raises rights issues

(continued from Page 1)
Hutchinson agrees that the present civil
commitment statute fails to provide the
courts with a legal definition of mental
illness. "I don't really have a serious dif-
ficulty working with our present code,"
Hutchinson says, but remarks that in case
a patient requests a jury trial on his com-
mitment, "I'd like to be able to define
mental illness for the jury."
A COMMISSION appointed by the state
legislature is in the process of drafting a
new mental health statute. The proposed
code would extend the generally accepted
requirement that the patient be "danger-
ous to himself or other" to justify commit-
ment.
The commission's draft would also au-

thorize hospitalization of a "person who is
mentally'ill and as a result of that mental
illness is unable to provide for his basic
physical needs and has overtly demon-
strated that inability."
However, the new code "isn't very help-
ful to me," Hutchinson says, since it, like
the present statute, fails to define men-
tal illness.
TEMPORARY COMMITMENT, Hutch-
inson says, "has always been a problem
acid will always be a problem. We want to
treat the patient if he needs treatment,
but we want to protect his civil rights."
"Is society going to say, 'We're going to
care for an individual against his will?' If
so, the rest is mechanics.
"But if a person has the mental illness

and you don't provide for that, eventually
the society. will protect itself."
HUTCHINSON claims although people
today are "much more tolerant than 20
years ago" toward mental illness, many
are still frightened and prejudiced against
the mentally ill.
Hutchinson says he and his office take
pains to inform candidates for commit-
ment of their legal rights and to provide
early hearings for temporarily committed
patients.
However, he admits that temporary
commitment will continue to be a prob-
lem even under liberal interpretation be-
cause it involves "depriving a person of
his liberty."
IS INVOLUNTARY commitment neces-

sary at all? "In my opinion, with ade-
quate psycho-social services there is nev-
er a need to commit anyone, no matter
how dangerous they are," says local psy-
chiatrist Richard Kunnes. "Hospitals be-
come a dumping grounds."
Unfortunately, community mental health
services are not adequate, he says.
Washtenaw County has one of the best
mental health services in the state, but
they're still grossly inadequate."
Kunnes attributes most mental illness to
the "social, economic and political" en-
vironment of the patient. He claims coun-
ty mental health agencies tend to treat pa-
tients' "alleged craziness as a medical
problem" rather than trying to alleviate
the problem situation.

Daily Official Bulletin
Saturday, June 16
DAY CALENDAR
Rugy Clb: Mid-west Rugby Meet
with 15 teams, Ferry Field, al day.
Monday, June 18
Cluster Communications Comm.: Op-
en meeting, 3524 SAB, noon.
SACUA: W. Alcove, Rackham Amph.,
3:15 pm.
Carion Recital: F. L. Marriott, caril-
1214 S. University
Dial 668-6416
Sat., Sun. & Wed. at 1, 3, 5,
7 & 9 P.M.
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.:
7 & 9 P.M. Only
"THEATRE OF AMAZING
FEROCITY. . .CLASSIC
INTERPRETATION,"

loneur at Kirk-in-the-Hills, Bloomfield
Hills, Mich., Baird Carillon, Burton
Tower, 7pm.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: June 21, 4
p.m. is last date for Spring-Surnmer
Term when the Registrar's Office will
allow refund for a 50 per cent with-
drawal.
ORGANIZATIONAL NOTICES
The Daily provides a service to SGC-
registered student organizations by list-
ing Organizational Announcements. No
copy should be of an advertising na-
th e; admis ion fe cannot be pu -
lished. Submit notices to Organi1a-
tional Services, 427 Michigan Union, no
later than 2:00 p.m. on the day prior
to the requested publication date.
Campus Crusade for Christ is spon-
coringy eekly ibleStudy meetings on
Tuesday ond Thursday a1 0:00 p.m. of
139 Tappan St. Apartment No. 8.
Applications for City of Ann Arbor
bicycle licenses are now available for
your cenvenience in the Organizationol
hervies centrol office, Room 425, of the
Michigan Union. Completed applica-
tions may, however, be turned in only
at the City Clerk's Office of City Ha11'
231 S. State Dial 662-6264
"AN INCISIVE, WELL - BAL-
ANCED FILM E , - UNIQUE
AMONG MOVIES BY OR
ABOUT BLACK PEOPLE."
-Susan Stork,
Detroit Free Press
Hcoky
1:15-3:10-5s
7 & 9 p.m.
-NEXT-
Dennis HNpper, Warren Oates
"KID BLUE"
Soon: 007 in "LIVE & LET DIE"

Graduation 1973: EPA says
return to tradition? L.A. cars

Vwrea" o
COMING_
"LAST TANGO IN PARIS"

will be closed
every Monday
through June,
July, and August
207 E. Liberty
NOW SHOWING! DOUBLE FEATURE!
"THE NIFTIEST CHASE SEQUENCE SINCE
SILENT FILMS!"PaulD.ZimmermanNewsweek

(Continued from Page 3)
Watergate affair" as his topic for
the commencement at St. Olaf's
College in Minnesota.
THE MAIN speaker at Harvard
University's commencement was
a young man who had been
arrested and suspended from the
school in 1969 for participating
in campus disorders.
The speaker, John Hook III, a
business graduate, denounced the
Nixon administration and "the
gray men whose main pursuit has
been more power." He said the
Watergate scandal "marks the
bottom of a long decline in the
integrity and competence of the
American government."
One of the few "counter" com-
mencements in the country took
place at the University of Michi-
gan Medical School, where stu-
dents dissatisfied with the offi-
cial speaker invited activist Dr.
Benjamin Spock to address them.
The official speaker was actor
Robert Young, television's Dr.
Marcus Welby.
ONE CAMPUS did break com-
pletely with tradition, but the
innovations had full administra-
tion approval.
Rochester Institute of Tech-
nology in New York held what
VICTORIAN 0 GOODYEAR
TIRES
FIGHT INFLATION.
We are making it possible for
U-M students, faCUlty, and staff
to buy tires, wheels, batteries at
deale.r prices. These are first
quality, first line tires made by
major tire manufacturers.
We also carry ras wheels
404 W. LIBERTY
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
General 0 Bridgestone
$2.00 8:30
FRI.-SAT.
Bill Vanaver
dazzlinq ... hilarious
a virtuoso on three in-
str ments-
He simply has to be one of
the best quitarists in the
country today..
-MichOsaily
1421! Nell SRET
76141

amounted to a carnival for its
2,500 graduating seniors last
weekend. Commencement day
was a colorful event with hun-
dreds of balloons and banners,
hot-dog stands and bands play-
ing everything from rock and
jazz to semiclassical music.
Mamie Eisenhower College in
Seneca Falls, N.Y., didn't have
a speaker either but it hadn't
been planned that way. Editor
Norman Cousins got his dates
mixed up and went off for a
round of golf instead of showing
up at commencement. He real-
lized his mistake too late, but
promised to send every gradu-
ate a copy of the speech he had
intended to make.
AT ST. PETER'S College in
Jersey City, N.J., the speaker
was Bill Bradley, former Rhodes
scholar and intellectual forward
of the championship New York
Knickerbockers basketball team.
The crowd, parents and students
alike, greeted him with the chant
that became synonymous with the
Knicks' style of playing: "Dee-
fense, Dee-fense!"
Football contribution to com-
mencement rhetoric was Miami
Dolphin Coach Don Shula who
told graduates at John Carroll
University that "after God and
family, winning is the most im-
portant thing."
Barnard College, the woman's
institution associated with Co-
lumbia University, invited folk-
singer Pete Seeger to its coin-
mencement. Instead of speaking,
he led the audience in a song-
fest.
LADY BIRD JOHNSON stood
in for her late husband at gradu-
ation ceremonies at the Univer-
sity of Virginia, and personally
handed out degrees to its law
school graduates.
RELIABLE
ABORTION SERVICE
Clinic in Mich-1 to 24 week
pregnancies terminated, byli-
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gist. Quick services will be ar-
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CALL COLLECT
(216) 281-606
24 HOUR SERVICE

must g
(Continued from Page 1)
those which it rejected - 17 ur-
ban areas in Indiana, Massachu-
setts, Minnesota, New Jersey,
Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas.
The other states will be covered
by later EPA proposals.
The plan approved for New
York City included restrictions
on taxi cruising in portions of
midtown Manhattan, and thrice-
yearly exhaust inspection for
cabs; tolls on all East River and
Harlem River bridges to encour-
age people to use car pools and
mass transit; an end to on-street
parking in Manhattan and reduc-
tions in off-street parking; re-
strictions on daytime deliveries
to stores, factories and business-
es; and stores and offices will be
asked to stagger their working
hours to lessen rush h n n r
crushes.
The northern New Jersey plan
involves retrofitting certain ve-
hicles with catalytic converters,
converting certain highway lanes
to exchisive tise by buses and
cariools, a ban on daylight deliv-
ery, and a freeze on the gasoline
supply-keeping it at this vear's
level.
UNDER A coirt order issed
last J-nuary, EPA mist either
anorove state ptays or impose
plans of its own by next Aug. 15,
for aehievir the air quality
standaris i 37 Urban areas.
The plas procosed so far lean-
ed heavily on traffic and arking
restrictions or tolls to discourage
individual auto commuting, coun-
terbalanced by snecial traffic
lanes for bises and car-nools to
encourage mass transportation.
"So we are basically attacking
the nroblem by askin neople to
chanee their habits - their long-
standinga d intimate relation to
the private automobile," said
Fri.
T H I S I S A fundamental
change, bttt the only one that
fundamentally will work."
The results, Fri said, will be
worth it. Public health will be
protected, he said, cities will be-
come better places to live, and
the nation will conserve energy.

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