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June 09, 1973 - Image 10

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Michigan Daily, 1973-06-09

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Page Ten

THE SUMMER DAILY

Saturday, June 9, 1973

Page Ten THE SUMMER DAILY Saturday, June 9, 1973

new

briefs 8 candidates vie in
from DoilysWire Services School Board race

~ MADRID-Generalissimo Francisco Franco, Spain's unchallenged
ruler since 1939, took the first concrete step toward transferring power
yesterday by appointing a conservative and traditional navy man to
succeed him as prime minister. The government Information Ministry
announced that Vice President Adm. Luis Carrero Blanco will be
sworn in as prime minister today. Franco, now 80, will retain the three
other top Spanish posts: head of state, commander in chief of the
armed forces and head of the country's only political party, the
"National Movement."
WASHINGTON-A bill designed to maintain high farm income
without harming consumers was approved by the Senate yesterday.
The bill's 78-9 passage struck a blow at subsidies to large-scale
growers by limiting future subsidy payments to $20,000 per year
CONVICTED Watergate bugger per farmer. The present ceiling is $55,000 per crop. Farm state
,James Mcord, who yesterday senators claimed the ceiling would jeopardize efforts to maintain
filed a motion for a nes trial, high production in the U.S.
MOUNT VERNON N.Y.--Two Penn Central Railroad communter
M cA C o rd trains collided last night at a station outside New York City. Authori-
ties said one man was killed and 40 other people were. injured. The
collision occurred when an express train rounded a sharp curve
banked by a stone wall and sm11ashied into the rear of a local train
which had stopped on express tracks to discharge passengers, a rail-
road spokesman said.
nlewtrial
Pf i DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
... ;,
law "by the massive efforts in
this case to obstruct justice "Satinrdi. Jane s9 Iriiin e ir of RotterdaI , Delft Lei-

(Continued from Page 1)
phasizes improving the elemen-
tary school environment as an
answer to the discipline problem.
Wood comments "at this time I
have nothing better to offer than
the alternate school."
Pooley also opposes the alter-
nate school and hopes the prob-
lem can be defeated in the
lower grades.
Also on Monday's ballot are two
millage proposals. Proposition 1
would provide 1166 mills per
year for the next five years to
help finance the public schools.
THE MEASURE is a renewal
of a present millage which pro-
vides about one third of the city's
school funding.
The second pronosilion would
gr antup to one mill per year for
the next three years to aid the
public library. The school board
will have the power to levy the
specific rate within the one mill
limit. If the millage is defeated
library operations will be dras-
tically reduced, according to
schoo~l officials.
All the candida tes, with tlhe ex-
ception of Autin, strongly support
both propositions. Aiitin lends her
support grudgingly because she
belie-es a steeply graduated in-
come tax provides the best
method of financing schools.
The top three vote getters will
be elected to three year terms
on the nine-person board.
Both Autin and Alting have
tried to seek support from the
liberal and radical community
elements. Martin has attempted
to soft-sell her conservatism but

her strength definitely lies in that
constituency.
BARHYDT AND Weinhold have
directed their campaigns toward
more conservative community
members but hope to pick up
some moderate support.
Wood, a "liberal Republican,"
ha tried to appeal to the middle
of the road voter, while Pooley
hopes to capture the moderate
and slightly left contingent. Pool-
ey has been called a candidate
who will "vote the liberal line
but won't initiate measures."
In terms of community control,
the left leaning candidates have
pushed for more student input
at the school board level. Both
Autin and Alting advocate stu-
dent members of the board with
voting powers. Pooley concurs
with a "why not" attitude.
THE OTHER candidates talk
about more "student input" but
oppose actually extending the
vote to a student on the board.
'Students often don't have the
experience to niake the necessary
judgments," Weinhold comment-
ed
U-M BARBERS
and STYLISTS
'Top Professionals"
Michigan Union

HE STRESSED repeatedly that
Liddy had convinced himi that
the bogging operstion had been
sinctiined bv former White
House counsel John Dean Il Iand
then Attorney general John Mit-
chell.
Mc(ord sad irregil-rities ms
his trial were similr to those in
the Pentag 'iiPapers tri-il of Dan-
iel Ellsberg and Anthony Russo
in Los Angeles which prompted
U. S. District Judge Matt Byrne
to dismiss all charges against
those two defendants.
In other developments yester-
day:
* Sirica promised a ruling
Tuesday morning, a half-hour be-
fore the start of the next Senate
Watergate hearing session, on
whether to grant special prosecu-
tor Archibald Cox's request for
a ban on live television cover-
age of testimony by Magruder
and Dean, both of whom were
expected to be granted immun-
ity at the same time.
* Sen. Sam Ervin (D-N.C),
chairman of the Senate commit-
tee, said he intended to expand
the hearings to include other il-
legal, government-sanctioned ac-
tivities, including the President's
abortive 1970 plan for secret do-
mestic surveillance and the 1971
break-in at the Los Angeles of-
fice of Ellsberg's psychiatrist.
Ervin said the inquiry would be
expanded without a Senate reso-
lution because his committee has
"as much authority as an East-
ern potentate."

v. . -1 .., 11 a uuc uttt, U b. .
DAY CALENDAR den & Amnersfoot, the Netherlands.
Mott Benefit Market: flea mrIket. Bwird Carillon, Burton. 7 pm.
>n rs rft'Aer b CREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
Bldg. Liberty & Fourth . siiall clay. SAB, 6470-
MusicSchool:C arillon lecture &
demnstration; 1936 film of casting an< INTERvIEwING ON CAMPUS: A Rep.
installation of the aird caris-on foi of Electronic Data Svs-te a Corp will
lowed by tour,. Aid. 4 MLB, 11 am be in this office June 13 to interview
Univorsity Players Guild: wiide's & evaluate o ,tstanding candidates for
'iThe Importance of Being Earnest,,' a systens engrg. comp. operations, re-
benefit for Simpson Memorial st. ,cruiting, & development programs. Sign
Mendelssohn, 8pm ip to interview
Sunday, June t0 ACTION / PEACE CORPS -/ VISTA
U Players Guild: wilde's "The Ini- will be in Run. 3529 SAB June 12, 13
portance of Being Earnest," see above. & 14. to discuss opportunities with in-
Monday, June 11 terestedl students. Appts. not neces-
Cluster Communications Comm : sary but do stop by to visit with the
Open itg 3524 sAB, noon. reps.
SACUA: 4025 Admin., 2 pm. NATURE CONSERVANCY will in-
UM & MSU Pharmacology Deit : terview in this office June 21 or I
Annual meeting: M. Seevers, "Follow- Preserve Mgt. Dir., Nat. Resource de-
ing W orld Drug Trails," W. Lecture gree candidates encouraged to sign up
Hall. Med. Set II, 4:20 pm. to interview. Ck with office for com-
Carilon Recital: Leen't Hart, city plete details
in700
SPECIAL ALL-NIGHT SHOW!
FRI. & SAT. DOORS OPEN 11:15, FIRST MOVIE 11:30. lOX
OFFICE CLOSES AT 12:15.
5 SUPER
5 SCREAMERS
Pit the Pendulum
HOUSE OF USHER PLUS!
PLUS! the raven
THE OBLONG BOX
PLUS!
Tales of Terror
FREE! A free pass to out next regular feature for
anyone who stays for all 5 movies.

THE full ERBOR
TfiPESTRY fiFD

WITERBED
SI-OPPE

SfhE

Ars Musica
BAROQUE ENSEMBLE
Telemann-Concerto for trumpets and oboes
Biber-Sonata for strings [
Vivaldi-Concerto for recorder
Marais-Suite for oboes and strings
Telemann-Conc. for tpt., oboe & strings
TOMORROW at 3:00 $1.75) & 8:00 ($2.50)
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
on Packard one light south of Stadium Blvd.

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OPEN lOAM TO 8PM, 7 DAYS A WiEEKC
; 76 557

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