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June 07, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-07

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Thursday, June 7, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, June 7, 1973 THE SUMMER DAILY Page Nine

Antioch strike ends
officially but issues
remain unresolved

St. Joseph's move approved
by regional planning unit

(Ontinued from Page)'
The administration has viewed
the strike solely as a struggle
for guaranteed aid, but the pro-
test holds greater implications
for the school. Strike supporters
and non-supporters alike have
rallied around issues which chal-
lenge the very nature of Antioch
College.
FUNDAMENTALLY at issue is
Antioch's self-promoted image as
the "vanguard of liberalism"
which has shaped the students'
expectations.
An applicant reading the An-
tioch Bulletin is promised a
"heavy political scene" which
allows students to "engage in
struggles of oppressed peoples to
gain their rights."
"But this is not 1968; we're into
something of a repressive era na-
tionally," countered S t e w a r d.
"They don't make money off of
poor people anymore."
A PROPONENT of the theory
of 'creative conflict," Dixon sees
dissent as "increasing the intel-
lectual excitement in the com-
munity."
However, students point out,
there is a destructive climate of
confrontation a n d politicization
fostered in the college. Conflict
has become the accepted way to
function.
Antioch has been beset by stu-
dent and employe strikes almost
every term during the past three
years.
ALSO UNDER attack by strik-
ers is the swift expansion of
Antioch College beyond the Yel-
low Springs campus to a "sys-
tem" of 34 educational centers in
the U.S. and abroad that pro-
testors say has drained financial
resources from Yellow Springs.
After a group of students had
filed an injunction suit with the
county court to end the lock-out,
Interim Dean Ewell Reagin at-
tempted to re-enter the buildings,
declaring that the continued de-
nial of access "threatened insti-
tutional survival."
When students and teachers
prevented Reagin from approach-
ing the building doors on May 22,
20 students were expelled and
seven teachers fired in an un-
precedented disciplinary move.
REFERRING TO the crisis as
a "civil war," Dixon maintained
that the strikers were using an
"excessive level of coercion" and
said the strike could possibly
close the college permanently.
"Going out of business is one
of the fortunate options of a
private institution," he explained.
AGAIN UNPRECEDENTED for
Antioch was the scene on June 1
of police in full riot gear march-
ing down the lanes of the Yellow
Springs campus towards a strike
picket line.
Original plans by strikers to
defend their hold on buildings
had been revised-instead, strik-
ers conducted a symbolic non-

violent demonstration in .oposi-
tion to police.
"Our representatives are in
New York City right now exrla r-
ing the strike to the Board of
Trustees," said White, as he
organized the picket line. "That's
the most important thing happen-
ing today."
BUT THE TRUSTEES gave
Dixon a strong vote of confidence
and full authority to deal with the
crisis.
Strikers plan to continue their
boycott of classes. for the re-
mainder of the term ending June
14, although campus buildings
will probably remain open.
The possibiilty remains that the
strike will drag on into the sum-
mer quarter. And as the attrition
rate increases ever more dra-
matically and applications con-
tinue to fall, the policy on both
sides of the dispute to "wait it
out" in itself threatens Antioch's
survival.

(Continued from Page 3)
St. Joseph M e r c y Hospital
(SJMH) in the provision of com-
prehensive ambulatory h e a I t h
care in and- around Washtenaw
County"
Planners have expressed con-
cern that since St. Joseph's is the
major provider of basic emer-
gency and walk-in health services
in the area, its move would make
those services inaccessible to
those who need them.
Although m a n y CHPC board
members agreed the hospital had

not met the conditions set by the
council, they w e r e apparently
swayed to approve the relocation
by the GDAHC recommendation
and the alleged urgency of the
move and the expansion of fa-
cilities the move would entail.
NEARLY 70 members of the
Washtenaw County community
listened to the board's debate,
and then a number of the visitors
voiced opinions for or against the
move.
Siding with the hospital ad-
ministrators w a s a substantial

State cops apprehend two
in massive LSD bust here

(Continued from Page 3)
a while but more dealers will
always pop up," he added.
On five separate occasions the
agents purchased large quanti-
ties of the drug from Stoffer.
Police have confiscated a total
of 65,000 pills, worth about a
dollar each on the street.
Noah said the investigation will

Nixon changes staff,
Laird gets top post

continue but that "we do not
anticipate any further arrests."
He indicated, however, as many
as fifteen more people have been
implicated as part of the drug
ring.
"WE CANNOT get enough evi-
dence to arrest the others," he
commented.
Krasny said more arrests are
a possibility but "not in the
immediate future."
Following the arrest Tuesday,
authorities raided Small's home
where they found nearly $5,000
in cash, and a small quantity of
drugs.
THREE PERSONS at Small's
residence were taken into cus-
tody. The police released them
after questioning.
Small will receive a prelim-
inary hearing on June 13 before
Judge Sandorf Elden. Stoffer's
hearing has been set for June
20 in a Chelsea court. Neither
has been scheduled for a trial
date.

contingent of the local Senior
C it iz e n s Guild. The Guild's
spokesman, Tim Ryan, told the
board, "We need a new hospital.
There are some who are out to
bury this, not to build it."
Eric Helt, spokesman for the
local branch of the Medical Com-
mittee for Human Rights
(MRHR) spoke on the financial
feasibility of the move. Helt said
the move will cost the average
SJMH patient $200 per one week
hospital stay for the next 25 to
40 years.
HELT CLAIMED the hospital
may not even be able to obtain
the $30 million bonding necessary
for the move, and recommended
the council consider the alterna-
live of renovation and remodel-
ing of the present building.
Kathy Biersak of the Free Peo-
ple's Clinic presented evidence to
show that St. Joseph's does not
serve as a community hospital.
Biersak cited the clinic's experi-
ence with the hospital, claiming
SJMH often tirns away referred
patients who cannot pay.
Biersak also charged the hos-
pital has tried to pretend it offers
community-oriented s e r v i c e s
which it does not offer.
Daily Official Bulletin
THURSOAY, JUNE 7
DAY CALENDAR
Computing Center: J. Cederquist,
'Input/Output 5.-' 413 P-A Bidg., 3
pm.
American Heritage Night: food from
the StephenFoster country, League
cafeteria, 1 pm.
UAC & Sr. Medical School Class: Ben-
jamin Spock, "Society & Health Care,.
League Balroom, 7:30 pm.
U5 Players Guid: Wildes rise Im-
portances ao S:ngEarnest." a benefit
for Simpson Memorial Inst., Lydia
Mendelssohn, 5 pm.

(Continued from Page 1)
Meanwhile, The New York
Times, in today's editions, pub-
lished a series of memorandums
which it said showed Nixon ap-
proved a domestic intelligence
gathering operation in 1970 -
even though he had been warned
parts of it were "clearly illegal"
and involved "serious risks" to
his administration if discovered.
The memos were reportedly
written by Tom Charles Huston,
then a staff assistant to the
president,
THE NEWSPAPER said one
of the memos outlined the scope
of the plan, a second stated that
the plan had been approved by
the President and a third outlined
efforts to enlist the support of
then - FBI director J. Edgar
Hoover.
On May 22, Nixon issued a

statement acknowledging the ex-
istence of such a plan and stated
that it had originally been ap-
proved. But he said it was re-
scinded after Hoover objected to
it, and it was never put into ef-
fect.
Nixon said the plan included
provisions for secret entry but
he mentioned nothing about the
legality of the procedures.
IN ANOTHER matter, Republi-
can campaign finance officials
have offered to settle a civil suit
in which Common Cause demand-
ed full disclosure of all contri-
butions and expenditures in the
1972 Nixon campaign. But a
spokesman for Common Cause
said the proposal "does not rep-
resent a major movement on
their part and we are not prepar-
ed to accept it."

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