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June 01, 1973 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-01

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riday, June 1, 1973

THE SUMMER DALY

Page Thirteen

I1ioJn ,17 H SM E AL aeTite

SDS leader may
have been spy

(Ocutinued from Page 1)
around Jim Mellen; one Ann
Arbor source said, "If Grathwohl
las the lieutenant pig, Mellen
was the general."
AFTER COMING to Ann Arbor
out of nowhere" in the fall of
96, Mellen almost immediately
moved to the top of a split group
ithin the local SDS chapter.
hile most local radicals con
inued to support much or all of
hS' complex ideological line,
ellen's faction called for vague-
t defined "militant street action'
nd repeatedly attempted to
creak up SDS meetings here.
intft
Mlten was one of severl SDS
-oders who founded Weather-
san in the snring of 1969.
In the fall of that year, he
as one of more than a dozen
rn-level "Weathermen" arrest-
in Chicago. According to The
laily's sources, the entire group
ent several days in jail and
uderwent intense police ques-
oning.
BUT MELLEN was released
nmsediately.
Detroit sources sav Mellen in-
iated a series of Weatherman
'tins aimed at disrupting class-
s and social gatherings at Mc-
omh County Community Col-
ee. In one incident, nine
Weatherwomen" were arrested
i disrupting an exam at Mc-
omb and beating a student and
n instructor
Susoicion again was raised
>it Mellen, whose actions,
'rces claim, "totally destroy-
earlier successful SDS ef-
rts to "radicalize" working-
ass young people in the Mc-
omb area.
SOURCES SAY s supicion
o'nd Mellen intensified when
e local office of the Rairal
duition Project (REP) was
rvalarized in early 1969.
REP. an nmretlt, groi in-
"ding ter'hers and stdents,
-red its office with Ann Arbor
DS. The hirglars removed an
tensie list of SDS regional
rnwats sod an entire documen-
ition of REP's people.
A REP source says the break-
was "clearly an inside job,"
d that susnicion immediately
>inted to Mellen, who was 'ne
only a handful of peole wh
ere highly familiar with the
fice layout.
"WHOEVER BROKE in knew
actly where they were gig,'
e source continues. "They must
ve gone over the place care-
Ily beforehand; they only made
vague attempt to smear around
>me papers to make it look for
1.
"No one could think of any in-
der who had appeared to be
asing' the place, except for
elen."
REP fired Mellen without ex-
anation several weeks after the
eak-n.
DETROIT SOURCES say Mel-
n mysteriously reappeared af-
r other "Weatherpeople" had
anished in 1970 and 71.
H i s reappearance coincided
recisely with a Detroit secret
and jury hearing where
rathwohl testified. One source
ates that he saw Mellen in De-
it with a large man closely
embling Grathwohl at the
me of the hearings.
Mellen apparently made a sim-
ar coincidental reappearance
veral months later in Cleve-
d during another secret fed-
ral probe of Weatherman's ac-
'vities.
A CHECK into Congressional
arings on SDS in early 1969
ay add credibility to some
barges of agent provocateur
imed at Mellen: the House Com-
'ttee on Internal Security out-
ned a massive list of persons
volved at every level of the
adical group.

Sources here and elsewhere
ay that Mellen's name was the
ly important one omitted.
In early 1970 a long list of
reatherman leadership figures

received federal indictments for
conspiracy to destroy public
buildings and attack police. Mel-
len, who was by then widely
known for his Weatherman ac-
tivities in Michigan, Illinois,
Ohio, New York, and oth-r
states, is described by sources
as the only "leader" who was not
indicted.
BY THAT TIME Weatherman
was largely an underground o'-
ganization. Its key figures hive
since been jailed or have sib-
merged themselves sufficentl, to
elude the FBI.
And several have died. An ex-
plosion in a Greenwich Village
townhouse killed Diana Oughtsn,
Ted Gold, and a third uniJenfi-
fied man who is thosght by roo-
cal circles to have been Terry
Robbins of Weatherinas' E"toe-
land collective.
Ted Gold had been active in
forming a Weatherman contm-
gent in New York City. Diana
Oughton, a now-legendar- radi-
cal figure, .spent several years in
Ann Arbor and joined with Mel-
len's group prior -o the ncep ion
of Weathermn.
HER BOYFRIEND, Bill Ayers,
also sone'Yng of a legend, has
disappeared.
Ayers and Oughton were once
both active in Xnn Arbor's (hil-
dren's Communi'y School, a la!e-
60's expe.iiment in alternative
education. One teach:r here de-
scribed them as "warm human
beings; the last people on earth
you would expect to get in'o
bomb-throwing t .nything like
that."

Antioch
strikers
to leave
1,G Ibuildings
Continued from Page 3)
It has already been announced
that the boycott of classes and
administrative services will con-
tinue.
"We want to show the nation
that Antioch has become a re-
pressive school," said White.
The strike was declared on
April 20 by financial aid and
minority "New Directions" stu-
dents who demanded that Antioch
give them a guarantee that their
present financial aid package
would be continued until gradu-
ation-in some cases, a time
period of four years to complete
Antioch's five year program.
COLLEGE OFFICIALS main-
rained they can offer only a two
year contract and are unwilling
to guarantee funds they might
not be able to deliver.
The "New Directions" students
were recruited under a program
designed to achieve "cultural
pluralism" by accepting aca-
demically "high risk" students.
Chaining and barricading dors
of classroom and administration
buildings, an estimated 250 to
300 strikers, including faculty,
blocked all entrances to occu-
pied buildings.
, an activist in Ann Arbor SDS and SEVERAL INSTANCES of sus-
from the far upper lefthand corner pected arson have hit the Antioch
. One source holds Jim Mellen "at campus within t'he last few
or Diana's death in a Greenwich weeks, but no suspects have yet
r later, been found.
BORED')

later in Weatherman, looks on
at a 1969 meeting of SDS here
least indirectly responsible" f
Village explosion nearly a yeai

Nothing's happening, right? Just a lot of useless reading to do.
Well DO something! Frinstance, truck on down to 420 Maynard
(that's the Daily) and say hi. You don't have to be a journalism
major or anything like that to join the staff. If you're sports-minded,
interested in advertising, or like to write, come to the
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Business Staff Edit Staff Sports Staff
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