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June 01, 1973 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-01

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riday, June 1, 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Eleven

L riday, June 1, 1973 THE SUMMER DAILY Page Eleven

MINERS FOR DEMOCRACY
Union reformers disband

By EVAN M. PATTAK
Associated Press Writer
CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Min-
ers for Democracy, the reform
movement that ousted the Unit-
ed Mine Workers union regime
of W. A. "Tony" Boyle, must be
phased out and forgotten, its or-
anizers say.
"The MFD was a good, viable
orce for what it was intended.
[t got what we wanted: the right
a elect our people. But we are
[nited Mine Workers and not
rMiners for Democracy," said
Jack Perry, newly elected presi-
ent of the union's District 17
4ere.

The movement eventually won
new court-ordered elections; and
last December, Arnold Miller
and his MFD slate won control
of the 200,000-member union.
MFD also came to symbolize
other intraunion fights against
the Boyle leadership, which went
to power in the 1960s with the
blessing of the late John Lewis.
Among them were demands that
Boyle quit appointing local lead-
ers in the UMW's districts and
allow miners to elect them.
NOW, even as miners under
MFD banners win the first elec-
tions in decades for most dis-
tricts, MFD leaders say it is time
to think of the UMW first. Some
observers view it as an effort to
achieve a united front for con-
tract negotiations in 1974.
MFD candidates have won of-
fices in Districts 17 and 31 in
West Virginia, 6 in West Virginia
and Ohio and 25 in Pennsylvania.
Last weekend, an MFD slate won
election in District 12 in Illinois.
However, miners in eastern
Kentucky's D i s t r i c t 30
voted strongly for officers who
are former Boyle supporters.
Other district elections are yet
to be held.
CURRENTLY, about half the
union's members belong to MFD-
controlled districts. Officials say
the distinction should not be em-
phasized.
"We don't care whether he's
a Miller man or a Boyle man,
as long as he's a coal miner,"
said Lawrence Hays, a monitor

in Indiana.
"That's all behind us now.
We're all United Mine Workers."
UNION OFFICIALS note that
the new district - level autonomy
has dispersed power throughout
the union and that any officer
who tries to stir up old antago-
nises will be isolated.
"There will be members on
the International E x e c u t i v e
Board and district officers who
were not supporters of Arnold,"
said a highly placed union
source. "And in that sense you
might say he will have a board
that represents a variety of. in-
terests."

A union official conceded, how-
ever, that the union is not unit-
ed.
"SOME OF the wounds will
stay fresh just because there are
some divisions," he said.
But he said most pnion people
became more optimistic after
the MFD sweep in the 24,000-
member District 17, Miller's
home base. It had been consider-
ed the most dissension - ridden
district.
Some 4,000 miners went on
strike several weeks before the
elections in what they termed a
protest of Miller's interference in
district affairs.
"WE'VE GOT to forget the
past," he said. "Remember,
we're going to have a tough bat-
tle with the coal operators when
the 1974 contract comes up.
We're still union men."

-Last Showing-
TONIGHT
PRIMEi
CUT
Based on a true story - the
bizarre case of a prostitution
rocket on a midwestern farm
where young orphans are held
against t h e i r will. Academy
Award winners Gene Hackman
(French Connection) and Lee
Marvin play the hell out of their
parts as business becomes mur-
der, syndicate style.
MODERN LANGUAGES
BUILDING
Aud. 3
8:00 & 9:30 P.M. $1.25
ALSO-THE CHASE with Mar-
lon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert
Redford, E.G. Marshall, James
Fox. Aud. 4, 7:15 & 9:30,
$1.25. Double Feature $2.00.

!r 'Ci Mackinac Jacks'
MUSIC-DANCING
Live Rock 'n Roll Bands
(6 Nights, Tues.-Sun.)
215 S. Ashley Open 8:30 P.M. 761-6455

political machine was the pri-
mary target of the reformist
Miners for Democracy move-
ment. Now that the movement
has won, it is disbanding.

rr led toe Nners for Democracy
novement after the death of
nion reformer Joseph Yablon-
ki, and recently onseated W.
.Tony' Boyle as union presi-
ent.
MFD WAS FORMED after the
69 murder of Joseph "Jock Ya-
onski, who was killed a short
e after he lost a bid to un-
at Boyle as union president.

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
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polka dot silken Ultressa*
shirt, white cuffed pants
and checkerboard shirt
jacket in sizes 5-13.
The set, $56.
Please park in the adjoining Maynard Street Auto Romp.
- s' Jacobson's will gladly validate your parking ticket.

m . :IV I rg
IN ERNEST LEHMAN'$ PRODUCMON OF
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Saturday & Sunday
Modern Lang. Aud.
$1.25 7:15 & 9:30
-Friends of Newsreel
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MCHauraos WARNER BROS.

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