100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1973 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, May 2, 1973'

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Thirteen

Fridy, ay 5, 973 HE UMMR DILY ageThitee

Amateurs face mountain
challenge to hunt gold

,__ -i

(Continued from Page 10)
ALTHOUGH gold - producing
technology is much improved
from a century ago, it takes
loads of money these days to re-
open old mines.
Technology is better all along
the line," said consulting geolo-
gist and engineer Jack J. Jutzy.
"But what really counts is labor
costs. Back in the '30s, a miner
cost only $2.50 a day and no
fringe benefits.
"He would produce a tremen-
dous amount of labor for that
price . . . nowadays, a miner
gets a lot more pay, and he also
has to have living quarters,
schools, a telephone, TV, and his
own boat."
IN THE '30s it cost about $40
a foot to sink a shaft. Today, the
costs can run to $200 a foot.

GOLD was frozen at $35 an
ounce by the 1934 Gold Reserve
Act, which also prohibited Amer-
icans from hoarding or trading
gold, except for holding unrefin-
ed gold in its natural state. Users
such as dentists and artists may
he licensed to hold gold.
Amateurs, apparently undaunt-
ed by the challenge of mountains
of flinty dirt that might occa-
sionally yield a speck of the best,
are reported flocking to the hills.
They're buying pans, picks,
shovels, how-to booklets and
rough-country apparel. The ar-
gonauts prowl around mostly on
weekends, nosing around streams
and squinting into pans for a
flash of yellow.
LOU WALKER, a 67-year-old
Sutter Creek Calif., pensioner

who claims to have made five
fortunes in real estate and the
stock market - and blown the
works on futile hunts for gold-
is skeptical.
"If all other costs were held
down and the price of gold went
to $400 an ounce, then the mines
might reopen," he said.
BUT whatever the problems,
and even if the price of gold
settles down to more familiar
elevations, some Californians al-
ways will be looking for the yel-
low stuff.
The gold hunters are a lot like
John Rose, but maybe not so
lucky. The Grass Valley, Calif.,
telephone cable splicer recently
kicked at what appeared to be
a round of cow dung, and came
up with a $2,800 nugget.

TONIGHT ONLY at 7:30 & 9:30
ANNA KARENINA
CLARENCE BROWN directed this 1935 production of Tolstoy's
story of illicit romance in the Imperial Court of Russia. GRETA
GARBO won the New York Critics Best Actress Award for her
performance.
Auditorium A Admission one dollar
TOMORROW NIGHT: LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
NOW "VSHOWING
OPEN SHOWS
DAILY ,AT
AT 1 PM.-3 Fl.M.
4:45
12:45 6:50 & 9 P.M.
231 S. STATE ST.-DIAL 662-6264

SUN SADE
- A
Skylab astronauts
ready for launch
of repair mission
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. A) - Skyla' 1 astronauts, the first
space do-it-yourself repairmen, were poised yesterday for a 9 a.m.
EDT launch this morning and the start of a salvage mission which
must succeed if America's space station is to be saved.
Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., Dr. Joseph Kerwin and Paul
Weitz will be drilled into orbit aboard an Apollo command ship packed
with tools and materials to repair the overheated and underpowered
Skylab station.
ENGINEERS, scrambling to complete the sun shields needed to
shade the space station, raced against the clock to have this devices
ready for stowage on the command ship in time for the launch.
Space Agency officials, meanwhile, hesitated in selecting which
of four sun shade designs to fly on Skylab 1 and in what order to
attempt to deploy them.
"All of the devices work to one degree or another," said William
Schneider, Skylab program director. "All of the devices have draw-
backs to one degree or another."
THE CANDIDATE sun shades include a tmsbrella, a sail-shaped
curtain, an A-frame shade and another shaped like an inflatable life
raft.
The fate of the $294 million orbiting laboratory, the essential ele-
ment in America's new $2.6 billion space program, depends on
whether Conrad, Kerwin and Weitz can erect a shield to shade the
sun-baked vehicle.

THE TOWNS PEOPLE WANTED PROTECTION FROM
A GANG OF BANDITS.
THEN THE STRANGER DRIFTED INTO TOWN, AND
GAVE THEM MORE PROTECTION TI-AN THEY BARGAINED
FOR.
CLINT EASTWOOD
"HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER"

FPIRE
FEDERICO FELLINPLO R WD
* DOUBLE FEATURE NO. 2
"Spirits" "How I Won The War"
Aud. 4 MLB Aud. 3 MLB
7:30 & 9:30 7:30 & 9:30
NEW WORLD FILM COOP

II ill

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan