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May 25, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-05-25

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Page Eight

THE SUMMER DAILY

Friday, May 25, ]973

Deserter testifies, surrenders
at unofficial amnesty hearings

WASHINGTON (') - A 25-
year-old man who said he de-
serted the Army three years ago
gave surprise testimony today
before a group of congressmen
holding hearings on amnesty,
and then turned himself in to
Capitol police.
Edward Sowder of Detroit ap-
peared before an unofficial
hearing and told the panel that
when he joined the Army in 1965
he believed in fighting in Viet-
nam.
"DAZZLING"
William Wolf, Cue
"V
Special
Times: -
1 P.M.-3:30
6:10-8:45
LAURENCE MICHAEL
OLIVIER CAINE
nIOSEPH LMANKIlWICZ i m oi
3rd
Hit
Week r

BUT he said what he witnessed
in Vietnam changed his mind
and "I went on strike against
the war."
"I make no apology for my act
of resistance. I could do noth-
ing else at the time. But under-
ground life has become intoler-
able to me. So I'm here today,
to draw attention to the true
facts concerning my case and
the cases of tens of thousands
like me.
"We are not criminals to be
hunted and imprisoned."
REP. BELLA ABZUG, (D-N.
Y.) heads the panel which in-
cludes Democratic Reps. John
Conyers of Michigan, Ronald
Dellums, Phil Burton and George
Brown of California, Parren Mit-
chell of Maryland and Benjamin
Rosenthal of New York.
When Sowder finished his tes-
timony he joined his mother and
brother in the audience of the
hearing. A few "minutes later he
heard that FBI agents were in
the hallway, waiting for him.
He left the hearing room but
found no agents. He walked down
the hall, accompanied by his
lawyer, looking for the agents
and still couldn't find them. Fin-
ally he turned himself over to
two Capitol policemen who took
him into custody to await the
FBI.
.IN THE BACKDROP of the
hearings were the freed Ameri-
can POWs, whose ,return home
was a condition posed by many
for even discussing amnesty.
And hanging over the session
was the chance that many men

avoiding prosecution for dodg-
ing the draft may not be law-
breakers. Their numbers were
put at an estimated 2,800 in Can-
ada, 550 in other foreign coun-
tries and 1,250 in hiding.
Two weeks ago, draft director
Byron Pepitone said the possi-
bility existed that many may not
have broken Selective Service
law.
WALTER MORSE, general
counsel of the Selective Service
System, said this would include
men whose records have errors
of fact or procedure in the pro-
cessing. He said when such er-
rors are found the man's case is
reopened, automatically wiping
out any possible charge of draft
evasion.
For those who have been pro-
secuted, about one quarter of
them have been convicted and
nearly . three-fourths of these
were put on probation. Recent
figures show that before the
war's end more than 4,000 were
accused but over 3,000 were not
convicted.
President Nixon has said he
is against amnesty. Some liber-
als from both parties have said
they would favor a conditional
amnesty that would include pub-
lic service jobs upon conviction.
THERE has been no recent
barometer of congressional senti-
ment for conditional or uncondi-
tional amnesty, such as proposed
in two bills introduced in the
House. One bill was introduced
by Abzug and the other by Del-
lums.

AP Photo
ARMY DESERTER Edgar Sowder of Detroit surrenders to Capitol
police after appearing before an Ad Hoc Hearing on Amnesty on
Capitol Hill. Sowder told Congress members at the hearing, "I
make no apology for my act of resistance."

PIRGIM,

RITA MESSENGER DIBERT:
RECENT DRAWINGS4
May 23 through June 3
Opening Reception Friday evening, May 25
from 7 until 10 p.m.ne
THE UNION GALLERY
Located on the first floor of the Michigan Union
GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday through Sunday, 12-5 p.m.
also Friday evenings, 7-10 p.m.
- - 4
colorado's natural ice cream
no no
chemical artificial 4
additives flavoring
making history in ann arbor

PRICE SURVEY
FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 22, 1973
Volunteers for the Public Interest Research Group in
Michigan have compiled a price survey on a- standard market-
basket of goods at the following area stores:

Rank Store, Location

% it
ovc
st

1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

KROGER, Westgate
KROGER, Arborland
MEIJER, Carpenter Road
A&P, Industrial
WRIGLEY, Maple Village
KROGER, Packard
GREAT SCOTT, Carpenter
VESCIO, Stadium
AP, Maple
A&P, Plymouth
KROGER, Broadway
WRIGLEY, Stadium-Liberty
WRIGLEY, Stadium-Washtenaw
A&P, Huron
The next PIRGIM price survey will be conducted
on May 30, 1973

ncrease
er no. 1
ore
0.4
1.0
2.3
3.3
3.3
4.6
7.8
9.6
10.8
11.5
11.9
13.3
14.9

C "QUITE
FUNNY"
-Time
THIS
CRITIC
DIDN'T
MLIKE
" TREA TE
tDF BLOD'"
f

VINCENT PRICE
A Shakespearean a c t or gets
revenge on the-critics who vili-
fied him!
with DIANA RIGG
and a 1214 s. university
large
cast of
British'CU
actorsThar Phn66-4
COMING
The controversial but
critically acclaimed
"LAST TANGO IN PARIS"

Applerose Natural
Foods
Capitol Market

Sgt. Pepper's
Soybean Cellars
Village Corners
Meijer Thrifty Acres:

Ralph's Market
Big Ten Party Store
Campus Corners,

..............

F'

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