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May 24, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

page Eight

THE SUMMER DAILY

Thursday, May 24, 197 3

Page Eight THE SUMMER DAiLY Thursday, May 24, 1973

Relaxed govt. standards and
new engine may cut polution
By EDWARD S. LECHTZIN, the Mustang - because of
UPI Auto Writer lower power output.
DETROIT - The Ford in your
future may be powered by an THE STRATIFIED-chargee
engine which the Japanese claim gine is a concept which is ov
can meet stringent federal smog SO years old. It basically s
controls without costly add-n de- rounds the spark plug with
rich fuel mixture in a pre-ig
Instestimony before the Senate tion chamber which ignites a le
Air and Water Subcommittee yes- fuel mixture in the main cha
terday, Ford President Lee Ia- ber, causing more complete bu]
cocca said an alternative to the ing of the fuel than in the cc
present internal combustion en- ventional engine.
gine could be ready for 1977 General Motors plans to hin
models if the government relax- its alternate power source on
es parts of its emission stand- own development of the Wanl
ards. rotary engine, now available
the United States in the Jape
'HE INDICATED that alterna- ese-built Mazda. GM hopes
tive might be some variation rf have it ready as an option on
x the stratified charge engine Chevrolet Vega in mid-1974.
which Honda plans to begin sell- While GM said recently that
ing in its Japanese-built Civic is continuing developmental wi
bodel last year. That engine al- on the stratified-charge engi:
ready has demonstrated it can it appears it can be used only
meet the 1975 pollution stand- lightweight cars and cannot m'
ards. .the 1976 federal standard f+
The engine has several draw- emissions of oxides of nitrog
backs with its inabiilty to meet
the 1976 standards for control- FORD has been working w
ling emissions of oxide of nitro- Texaco, the Defense Departm
gen toping the list as far as the and EPA for several years or
U.S. market is concerned. No stratified charge engine of
other engine has shown it can own which it terms the PROC
meet that standard and the auto- It's a horsepower which it h
makers, as well as former En- ed to put into the Army's je
vironmental Protection Agency type vehicles.
Administrator William Ruckles- But Iacocca said it would h-
bhals, have asked that it can be been impossible to convert
changed. another powerplant for 1975 m
Ford's production estimate in- els even if one had been devel
dicated that, if a stratified engine ed three years ago.
is produced, it will be used on the
company's smaller line of cars- ao si aotany
Ford President Lee Iacocca the Pinto, Maverick and possibly Iacoa 'toa
anin rn-tthat ff rim

its
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Ann Arbor
News hit
inhearing
By GORDON ATCHESON
A public hearing, sponsored by
the Human- Rights Commission,
last night focused on The Ann
Arbor News' failure to comply
with a city ordinance against
printing discriminatory classified
advertising.
The ordinance prohibits publi-
cation of classified ads which dis-
criminate on *the basis of "sex,
religion, race, color, religion, na-
tional origin, marital status, sex-
ual preference or education asso-
ciation" except when such char-
acteristics are bona fide occupa-
tional requirements.
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS al-
legedly has not satisfactorily
complied w it h the ordinance
since City Council enacted the
measure on Jan. 8 this year. The
newspaper refused to send a
spokesperson to last night's hear-
ing.
"The Ann Arbor News is the
most blatant violator of the ordi-
nance, commissioner Colleen Mc-
Gee said. The newspaperis ap-
parently particularly lax in
screening ads which discriminate
on the basis of sex.
Representatives from The Daily
and Herself addressed the com-
mission during the hearing. Both
representatives indicated t h e y
encountered little trouble with
discriminatory advertisements.
"We tell people they can't run
certain discriminatory words in
the ads. People rarely refuse to
change the objectionable word-
ing," The Daily's classified ad-
vertising osanager Patti Wilkin-
son said.
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS has
objected to the ordinance on the
grounds it violates the constitu-
tional right of a free press.
The commission will present
City Council with a report on the
best method of forcing compli-
ance with the law.

NOW SHOWING
OPEN SHOWS
DAILY AT
__ _ __ _ _ 1 P.M.-3 P.M.
T 4:45
12:45 6:50 & 9 P.M.
231 S. STATE ST.-DIAL 662-6264
THE TOWNS PEOPLE WANTED PROTECTION FROM
A GANG OF BANDITS.
THEN THE STRANGER DRIFTED INTO TOWN, AND
GAVE THEM MORE PROTECTION THAN THEY BARGAINED
FOR.
CLINT EASTWOOD *
HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER"
*> g
w -

eng ne nepi tnai errec ve
meets both emissions require-
ments and the practical demands
of reliable, reasonable-cost per-
sonal transportation."

LES-E9s
starg
costarrng
Thursday & Friday-MLB Aud. 3
7:30 & 9:30 -New World Film Coop

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