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August 11, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-08-11

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Page 2-Saturday, August 11, 1979-The Michigan Doily
REFUSES CONDITIONS ON GIFTS
'U'says foreign funds accepted with caution

...., i

terest in thestudy of Islam.
"That's a very sincere attitude that
comes in all sorts, shapes, and sizes,"
he said.
THE UAE PLACED no conditions on
acceptance of the money, Windfuhr
stressed. He said his department had
conducted an international search at
over 150 institutions to find a scholar to
fill the assistant professorship. The
University made the final choice of who
would occupy the position, he said, and
the UAE had no influence on the
decision.
He said that apart from a written
agreement that the funds would be used
for Islamic studies, the UAE had no
control over how the money would be
used.
"The Near East is such a controver-
sial area these days, I think we bend

over backwards to make clear that
those gifts do not have any inap-
propriate strings attached," LSA Dean
Billy Frye said Wednesday.
FRYE SAID that a proposed gift
from a foreign government is reviewed
by the LSA executive council and the
department which would receive the
money. In addition, he said, the Univer-
sity president would have to- approve
any funding from a foreign gover-
nment.
Foreign funding is most likely to be
used to support visiting faculty, to fund
student fellowships, to make library
purchases, or to establish an en-
dowment for a department, Frye said.
He said the appointment of a
professor had the greatest potential for
racial or political bias.
FRYE AND others said the Univer-

sity is careful in dealing with foreign
governments because of the lessons
learned at other institutions, notably
the University of Southern California at
Los Angeles (USC).
In October 1978, it was disclosed that
a proposed Center f9r Arab and Islamic
Studies at USC was to be funded by a
group of U.S.-based multi-national cor-
porations, which conducted billions of
dollars in business in Saudi Arabia.
Critics charged that the contract bet-
ween the corporations and USC failed to
specify which party would have control
over research conducted at the center.
The USC Board of Regents cancelled
the contract in June after it was also
disclosed that the would-be director of
the center was a former official of the
Arabian American Oil Co., with close
ties to Saudi officials.

Church Worship Services
r~nnr~~r~n~r~~nrnnnrr~rr~r~~nrnnn~r~n~r~r#n

STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald IR. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Commuinion in the
Chapel.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship in the
Sanctuary.
Church Sthool for pre-school and
elementary ages, 10:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-Guest speaker:
Rev. Ted Katchel-'Clowning Around."
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University
and Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor Clayton Libolt
10 a.m-Service of Holy Communion.
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Robert Kavasch, Interim Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
S1663-5560
No midweek Worship.
One Sunday Service at 9:00 a.m.
Holy Communion every other Sun-
day.* * *
LORD OF THE LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928

USC REGENTS appointed a broad-
based committee to.review the center's
contract and funding.
University officials rejected the idea
that such a conflict of interest could
happen here.
According to Associate Vice-
President for Academic Affairs Davis,
"We were very clear with them (the
UAE) when we worked out the initial
donation, that we were not locking our-
selves into a difficult situation, with
them selecting the professor."
DAVIS SAID she could not remember
a single instance where the University
broke off serious negotiations over a
donation because of strings attached to
the gift.
When foreign students apply to the
University, they must compete for ad-
mission with American students, in ad-
dition to fulfilling an English language
requirement.
"If an individual country or univer-
sity tried to be totally proscriptive in
their selection of an individual to come
here, we would not agree to that,"
Davis said.
SHE SAID THE University is
"safeguarding its commitment" to af-
firmative action and political neutrality
through this position.
As an illustration of how sensitive
University faculty and administrators
are to the issue, one source who refused
to be identified said he had been asked
casually once by a foreign professor if
he would help the professor's home
university find American scholars
willing to teach in his country.
The source refused diplomatically by
putting the matter off indefinitely. He
said the professor's query was a
request for a favor from him in-
dividually, which had nothing to do with
the University or the money that the
University received from that
professor's government.
BUT THE source staunchly refused
to be identified, saying that he would
not want the incident to be miscon-
strued and endanger the foreign fun-
ding.
He stressed the academic nature of
the program, and the overwhelming
need to increase understanding bet-
ween the U.S. and foreign countries.
But, he said, "We would reject
anything (money) that carries with it
any pressure or conditions."
"THAT GOES ON all the time,"
Davis commented. She said the Univer-
sity regards such requests from foreign
professors as a matter between the in-
dividuals concerned and the foreign
country. "That's not anything we get
into asa University," she said.
Davis said the heyday for Middle
Eastern countries approaching the
University was about three or four
years ago. She said the University was
"pretty firm" in stating it would accept
no gifts with conditions.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 64-S
Saturday, August 11, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Manard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
4819. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesday.through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109,

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

GOD'S BUSINESS! GOD'S WORDS!is there anything that
should claim our attention more? The soul created in the
image of God Almighty, and which, after a short span of life
in the flesh will be called forth from the dust to live eternally
in the Spirit World!
I think the first recorded words of Christ after His baptism
by John: "MAN SHALL NOT LIVE BY BREAD ALONE, BUT
BY EVERY WORD THAT PROCEEDETH OUT OF THE
MOUTH OF GODI" Matthew and Luke 4:4.
King David, the man after God's heart, stayed at home one
time when his army was out fighting. We are not told that he
was sick, but we are told he was laying on his bed. He got up
and saw a beautiful woman taking a bath ina nearby house.
He was King, he had great power, and he sent for her. She
became pregnant. Her husband was a soldier, one of David's
great soldiers and he was away fighting in the war. David so
arranged things that it appeared he was killed in legitimate
warfare. God's love for David did not cause Him to fail to
faithfully and terribly deal with him: "Now therefore the
sword shall never depart from thine house: because thou
hest 'despised Me,' --."
"And The Lord STRUCK the child that Uriah's wife bare
unto David, and it was very sick, - - And it came to pass on
the seventh day the child died." -2nd Samuel, chapters 11,

12.
His son Amnon raped his half-sister Tamar. Absalom, her
brother, killed Amnonl Later on Absalom usurped his
father's throne and drove him out, etc., etc. Yet David was a
"man after God's heart" - a man after God's heart in the way
he repented and accepted the severe judgment of God,
reminding one of the words of Job: "Yea, though He slay toe,
yet will I trust Him!"
King Hezekisah was sick unto death. Isaiah the Prophet
came unto him and said: "Thus saith-The Lord, Set thine
house in order: for thou shalt die, and not live!" The King
turned his face to the wall and began to pray, and cry, and
complain, and tell God why he thought he ought to have a
longer time to live. God heard his cry, and granted him 15
years more time to live. Three years later his son Manasseh
was born, who succeeded him as King. "But (Manasseh) did
that which was evil in the sight of The Lord, like unto the
abominations of the heathen, whom the Lord cast out before
the children of Israel." - 2nd Chronicles 33:2. - -
Therefore thus saith The Lord.God of Israel, Behold, l am br-
inging such evil upon Jerusalem and Judah, that whosoever
heareth of It, both his ears shall tingle. --
it Is a fearful, a terrible thing to disregard the command of
God!

P.O. BOX 405 DECATUR, GEORGIA 30034

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