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August 04, 1979 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-08-04

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Page 2-Saturday, August 4, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Murray to leave A2 position

(Continued from Page D-
But, he emphasized, his career came
first, and thus he could not turn down
the city manager's job in Cincinnati.
His new salary in Cincinnati had not
been finally negotiated, he said, but the
city had offered him "in excess of
$60,000." His present salary is $47,000
a year.
CINCINNATI COUNCIL Member
and Vice-Mayor David Mann explained
yesterday that the city manager's.
position in Cincinnati was one of
"enormous prerogatives and a high
level of visibility."
He said the city manager controlled
the flow of information to city council
and the choice of alternatives among
which council made its decisions.
Mann said the Cincinnati city council
interviewed five candidates for the job
Thursday from all over the country and
one from Cincinnati.

HE SAID MURRAY was "very direct
in his answers to the questions we were
asking."
Mann said Murray's - biggest
challenge would be soothing relations
between the Cincinnati police force and
the city's black community.
Tension between blacks and police in
Cincinnati came to a head on May 8,
when a black man and a white police of-
ficer were both slain in separate in-
cidents in one day.
THE SLAYINGS brought the number
of police officers killed in 1979 to three
and also marked the third time a black
suspect had been shot to death by
police.
The incidents aggravated an already
heated situation, as police had been
working without a contract since
January. Police demonstrated for
heavier armaments on May 9, walking

off the job for a day.
"I don't think they hired a black per-
son because a black person could han-
dle it better," Murray said. Murray
said' the Council asked him what he
could do to reduce racial tension and he
replied, "I don't know."
"THE REALITY is that we collec-
tively ... probably ran him (Murray)
through a tougher process than would
otherwise have been the case," Coun-
cilmember Mann said. "In the long run
his color won't mean a damn thing one
way or the other," he added.
Dewey Fuller, executive director of
the Cincinnati chapter of the National
Urban League, said yesterday he was
"very pleased" that Murray had been
chosen.
Fuller, however, was wary of giving
his unconditional support to Murray.
He said that Murray's appointment

Chrc Wors Se
Cfiurcfi wo4h Sriesm

STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Commuinion in the
Chapel.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship in the
Sanctuary.
Church Sbhool for pre-school and
elementary ages, 10:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-Guest- speaker:
Rev. Ted Katchel-"Clowning Around."
* * * -
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University
and Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor Clayton Libolt
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Robert Kavasch, Interim Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
t663-5560
No midweek Worship.
One Sunday Service at 9:00 a.m.
Holy Communion every other Sun-
day. * * *
LORD OF THE LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday--Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928

"would certainly give more confidence
to the black person (because) problems
will be dealt with a little more sen-
sitivity ...
BUT, HE SAID, just appointing a
black man won't help. "There are some
real problems that need to be dealt
with," he said.
Cincinnati City Council member
Tecumsah Graham said the council
chose Murray because of his record as
a city administrator and because of
"his direct and honest answers" to
questioning.
Graham also said the council was
impressed by Murray's "good fiscal
responsibility."
Ann Arbor Assistant City Ad-
ministrator Patrick Kenney yesterday
credited Murray's "consistent
management" with streamlining the
city's budget during his tenure here.
Bargaining
'crucial' for
book rush
strike vote
SContinuedfrom Page tI
means guaranteed if there is a strike,"
he added. "It could be a crucial blow."
NANATELL SAID the Board had
pushed to reach a settlement since the
start of negotiations so the union
couldn't "hold rush over us," as a
pressure point.
"I'm hoping (negotiations can con-
tinue) so enough of the key issues" can
be settled before book rush, thus aver-
ting a strike, said negotiator Sap-
pington.
Sappington said "everyone would
suffer," including management, em-
ployees and students if a strike took
place. The Cellar controls about 60 per
cent of the campus textbook market
and the other bookstores would not
have enough merchandise in stock to
meet demands, Sappington added.
"We would do everything we could to
keep the store open during rush," Sap-
pington said.
The wage package will be discussed
for the first time this weekend as
negotiators try to cover all of the major
issues in the contract, Sappington said.
"The union is interested in talking
about everything," the manager said,
"to get a sense of where we're coming
from."
Vargo said representatives for the
IWW office in Chicago, Dick DeVries
and Mike Walsh, will attend the
meetings this weekend to assist in the
discussions.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 59-S
Saturday, August 4, 1979
is edited ana iaia ea oy stuuents at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesdaythrough Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POS-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

I think the first recorded words of Christ found in the Bible.
are In Luke 2:42-52: "HOW IS IT THAT YE SOUGHT ME?
WIST YE NOT THAT I MUST BE ABOUT MY FATHER'S
BUSINESS?" And the first recorded words of Christafter His
baptism by John: "MAN SHALL NOT LIVE BY BREAD
ALONE, BUT BY EVERY WORD THAT PROCEEDETH OUT
OF THE MOUTH OF GOD!" Matthew and Luke 4:4.
GOD'S BUSINESS!GOD'S WORDS!Is thereanythingthat
should claim our attention more? The soul created in the
image of God Almighty, and which, after a short span of life
in the flesh will be called forth from the dust tolive eternally
in the Spirit World!
Onetime when the children of Israel were in the wilderness
as they journeyed from Egypt to The Promised Land they ran
out of water. They became riotous and rebellious. God told
Moses to go out before the people and strike a rock with his
rod, and water would pour forth from it. And It did. Atla later
period under similar circumstances God told Moses to
"Speak" to the rock - not Strike with his rod as in the first
Instance. Moses was angrywith the people fortheirrebellion
and unbelief, and instead of speaking to the rock as God
ordered he struck It with his rod In his anger. God honored
Moses before the people, even In his disobedience, and
water poured forth from the rock. However, God told Moses
on account of this disobedience he would not be permitted

to go across Jordan Into the Promised Land.
Later as they drew near to the Promised Land, and God
began to give them great military victories, Moses said:
"AND I BESOUGHT THE LORD AT THAT TIME, SAYING, O
LORD GOD, THOU HAST BEGUN TO SHOW THY
SERVANT THY GREATNESS, AND THY MIGHTY HAND:
FOR WHAT GOD IS THERE IN HEAVEN OR IN EARTH,
THAT CAN DO ACCORDING TO THY WORKS, AND AC-
CORDING TO THY MIGHT? I PRAY THEE, LET ME GO
OVER, AND SEE THE GOOD LAND THAT IS BEYOND
JORDAN. --- BUT THE LORD WAS ANGRY WITH ME
FOR YOUR SAKES, AND WOULD NOT HEAR ME: AND
THE LORD SAID UNTO ME, 'LET IT SUFFICE THEE:
SPEAK NO MORE TO ME OF THIS MATTER!'"
When Mrs. Potiphar tempted Joseph, he said: "HOW
THEN CAN I DO THIS GREAT WICKEDNESS, AND SIN
AGAINST GOD?" Genesis 39:9.
The Apostle Paul asked God three times to "lake away the
thorn in his flesh." God refused, but told him "My grace is
sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in
weakness.
"It is a fearful, a terrible thing to disregardlthe command of
God! Read the third chapter of Genesis, and take heed. What
God says, and does, is best, though all the world is of a con-
trary opinion and against It.

P. O. BOX405 DECATUR,

GEORGA03 t .. -., ' .. I , - . . .

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