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August 02, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-08-02

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday,
Jesse Jackson leaves South Africa;
gov 't protests anti-apartheid remarks

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
(AP) - Black American civil rights
leader Jesse Jackson ended his crusade
here against South Africa's racial
policies yesterday, having brought
feuding black leaders to a tentative
reconciliation and angered the gover-
nment with his comments.
Jackson, considered the most influen-
tial black activist ever allowed into
South Africa, departed for the U.S.
yesterday. He said he plans to ask
President Carter to push as hard for
racial peace in South Africa as he did
for peace in the Middle East.
THE GOVERNMENT already has
protested to the U.S. State Department
over Jackson's anti-apartheid
statements, diplomatic sources said.
The Johannesburg Star said gover-
nment officials considered expelling
Jackson after his remark in a radio in-
terview that South Africa was "a
terroristic dictatorship.".

Jackson arranged a meeting earlier
this week among three black leaders
who have been feuding for years,
nudging them a step closer to peace.
Jackson brought together chief Gat-
sha Buthelezi, head of the 250,000-
member Zulu Inkatha cultural
movement; Bishop Desmond Tutu,
general secretary of the South African
Council of Churches; and Dr. Nhato
Motlana, chairman of the Soweto
Committee of Ten. The committee is
the unofficial representative of the
more than one million blacks who live
in Soweto, the black satellite city of
Johannesburg.
TUTU AND Motlana have spurned
Buthelezi, who has the largest following
among South Africa's blacks, because
he chose to work within the apartheid,
or racial separation, framework. Tutu
and Motlana refuse to take part in any
government activities.
After their meeting earlier in the

week, Buthelezi said: "The spirit was
amicable and we made progress in the
right direction." Tutu described the
meeting as a "turning point."
In several speeches Jackson said he
hoped the trio of black leaders would
unify and push for a national black con-
vention on equal rights for blacks.
THE ONE-TIME adviser to the late
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., also said
he would try to enlist the support of
boxing star Muhammad Ali in blocking
the world heavyweight title fight bet-
ween American John Tate and South
African Gerrie Coetzee. Jackson objec-
ts to the fight because it is to be held in a
rugby stadium that ordinarily is
segregated, although blacks will be
allowed to attend the Oct. 20 World
Boxing Association bout in Pretoria.
The Johannesburg Star said yester-
day that Jackson's bitter attacks on
apartheid and his call for an end to4J.S.
investment in South Africa could end

Jackson
the new "open door" policy that has
allowed many controversial Americans
to visit.
Diplomatic sources here did not view
the South African reaction to Jackson's
comments as a serious threat to U.S.-
South African relations.

100 DELEGATES ATTEND FIRST CONVENTION:
Gay Jews find cold reception in Israel

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) - -
Homosexual Jews from around the
world held their first convention in
Israel and got a cold reception.
Under fierce pressure from Orthodox
rabbis who hold fast to the biblical con-
demnation of homosexuality, hotels and
collective farms turned away the gays,
forcing them to meet and tour in secret.
THE JEWISH National Fund, par-
tron of Israel's forests, tried to refund a
19,000 donation to plant trees in the
name of the International Conference of
Gay and Lesbian Jews.
"This is supposed to be a Jewish
state, not just a heterosexual Jewish
state," said Arnie Newman, 26, of Erie,
Pa., acting as spokesman for the group.
Most of the 100 delegates from 13
countries left Israel this week after a
three-day conference and a week's
tour. Many of them were Americans.
The Americans said they represented
2,500 members of gay synagogues and
social clubs in 16 cities across the coun-
try.
NEWMAN SAID the organization
Senator says
offticial
should quit
(Continuedfrom Pagr3)
Christopher said Fauri plans to
outline at that meeting his proposals for
strengthening the state's hand in
regulating horse racing and reviving
the industry's sagging economic for-
tunes.
FRENCH PAINTINGS
WASHINGTON (AP)-The painting
"Dante and Virgil in Hell" by Eugene
Delacroix has been lent to the National
Gallery of Art by the Musee du Louvre
of Paris for showing in a gallery of
paintings of the French Romantic
period.
Also on loan from the Louvre are
Delacroix's "Portrait of Chopin" and
Gustave Courbet's "Portrait of
Berlioz," as well as Delacroix's
"Paganini," lent by the Phillips Collec-
tion in Washington.

was founded in 1976 "in response to the
United Nations anti-Zionism resolution.
We wanted a greater identity with
Israel and with Judaism."
But Jewish law, enforced here by the
powerful religious minority, is spelled
out in Leviticus 19:22: "You shall not lie
with a man as with a woman. It is an
abomination."
"We are in violation of a particular
commandment, but what Jew isn't?"
countered Newman. "Mortal man has
no right to decide which of the 613
commandments to keep and no one can
keep them all."
NEWMAN MAINTAINED that many
homosexual Jews "are very
traditional, going to synagogue
regularly and keeping kosher homes.
And we run the whole gamut - doctors,
lawyers, teachers, everything. I met
my first gay Jewish garbageman
here."
A prominent Jerusalem rabbi, Simon
Dolgin, called homosexuality "a tran-
sgression against the law of God. At
best, or at worst, it's a private matter.
ENDS TONIGHTI
"MANHATTAN"
6:20 8:10, 10:00
5th Avenue at Liberty St 701-9700
Formerly Fifth ou mTheater
STARTS TOMORROWI
He had to make a living like
everyone else ... he settled
for what he could get.

But no one should make a convention to
flaunt it in public."
Newman said the conference
originally was booked at a collective
farm he would not name. "The rab-
binate told them they would take away
the dining room's kashrut certificate
attesting that food is kosher and any
food produced by the kibbutz would not

be certified as kosher," he said.
That weapon is a powerful one, used
by the rabbinate before in disputes with
hotels that need the certificate to at-
tract religious customers.
"We don't want to jeopardize
anybody's kashrut certificate,"
Newman explained.

The Ann Arbor Film Coe eraive
Presents at Aud A-$ .50
THURSDAY, AUGUST 2
THE ROLLING STONES RETROSPECT
7& 10:20-AUD A ANGELL HALL
RARE STONES FILMS JUST RECENTLY MADE AVAILABLE WILL SHOW IN PLACE
OF GIMME SHELTER, WHICH WILL BE SHOWN AT CINEMA GUILD, FRI.,
AUG. 24.
THE STONES IN THE PARK
(Great Britain, 1969, 50 minutes)
A sensational concert in London's Hyde Park, July 5th, 1969. The Stones are
MICK JAGGER, KEITH RICHARD, BILL WYMAN, CHARLIE WATTS, and MICK
TAYLOR, who replaced Brian Jones (he drowned two days before the concert,
which emerges as a tribute to him). The film includes concert preparation
and interviews with the Stones preceding their performance before almost
half-million people. Songs performed include "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Hanky
Tonk Woman," "Lemon Squeezer." and "Sympathy for the Devil."
CHARLIE IS MY DARLING
(PETER WHITEHEAD, 1965, 50 minutes
The incredible power and magnetism of the Rolling Stones, at their peak, is
captured during this group's tour of Ireland, Sept. 3rd and 4th, 1965. This
cinema verite account includes interviews, backstage antics and the Stones
performing with BRIAN JONES, a chief creative force in the world's most
famous Rock'n'Roll group. Songs performed include "Get Off My Cloud,"
"Heart of Stone," "Play With Fire," and "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," An
exciting opportunity to observe one of the best Stones' concert on film.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 2
NED KELLY
(Tony Richardson, 1970) 8:40 only--AUD A
Richardson combined his penchants for angry men and interesting locations
for this film, which focuses on the Jesse James-like exploits of Kelly (well
played by MICK JAGGER), his family and his gang of Irish formers battling
an English landlord on the Australian frontier.
WE SUPPORT PROJECTIONIST'S LOCAL 395

GAZZARA
ST
FRIDAY 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
Adults $1 .50 tit 6:30

FIM
RU!

.

4- '.

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