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August 01, 1979 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-08-01

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Page 6-Wednesday, August 1, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Bundy promises to appeal'death
MIAMI (UPI) - Theodore Bundy the apartment of dance student Cheryl so clear and convincing virtually no
was sentenced to death in Florida's Thomas, one of the three coeds who was reasoning person could differ" with the
electric chair yesterday for the savagely beaten. Thomas' skull and death penalty, Cowart said.
strangulation murders of two coeds, but shoulder were fractured in the pre- The judge had these final words for
the flippant defendant said he "could dawn rampage. Bundy:
not accept the verdict" and would ap- Cowart called the pantyhose -IT'S A TRAGEDY for this court to
peal. strangling and bludgeoning of the coeds see you as such a total waste of
Judge Edward Cowart followed the "heinous, atrocious and cruel." One of humanity. You're a bright young man.
recommendation of the trial jury in the victims was bitten and sexually You'd have been a good lawyer. I'd love
sentencing the 32-year-old law school abused. to have you practice in front of me. But
dropout to death in the Florida State "The aggravating circumstances are you went another way, partner. Take

sentence
care of yourself. T don't have any
animosity towards you, I want you to
know that."
He still faces trial in Lake City, Fla.,
in September for the slaying of 12-year-
old junion high school student Kimberly
Leach. He was on trial in Colorado for
the murder of Dearborn, Mich., nurse
Caryn Campbell when he escaped from
jail and made his way to Florida.

Prison electric chair, where John
Spenkelink was put to death last May
25.
Bundy thus became the 135th person
under a death sentence in Florida.
THE DEFENSE team said it would
appeal Bundy's conviction for the
slaying of Chi Omega sorority sisters
Lisa Levy and Margaret Bowman and
the savage beating of three other
Florida State University coeds in
Tallahassee Jan. 15,1978.
Bundy, wearing a grey suit, sat with
his arms folded and looking straight
ahead as the beefy, bespectacled judge
sentenced him to death.
He told Cowart: "I'm innocent of the
charges to which I've been convicted.
I'm really not able to accept the ver-
dict ... and cannot accept the senten-
ce."
THE JUDGE also sentenced Bundy
to two consecutive 99-year terms for
burglarizing the Chi Omega house and

Power Co.
LANSING (UPI) - Consumers
Power Co. must turn over seven
documents to a citizens lobby group
which is fighting the utility's request
for a $314 million rate hike, the
Public Service Commission (PSC)
said yesterday.
The Michigan Citizens Lobby and
the United Auto Workers-
Community Action Program want
the documents to aid their fight
against the utility's request for the
rate hike, which they charge would
pass on the costs of repairs to the
Palisades Nuclear Power Plant to
utility users.
The rate hike, which the com-
mission may act on by the end of the
year, would take effect over a two-

to release 7 documents
The utility must give the lobbyists
year period, the documents by Aug. 6.
IN 1977, Comsumers agreed to a THE PSC SAID that while it is not
$32 million out-of-court settlement in in a position to renegotiate the set-
its suit against the Bechtel Power tlement between Consumers and
Co., the firm which built the Bechtel, it does believe the release
Palisades facility in South Haven. of the documents will make an im-
Consumers charged that Bechtel portant contribution in determining
had used faulty equipment and poor the outcome of the utility's current
insulation and had overrun cost rate hike request.
estimates in its construction of the The PSC denied the lobbyists'
atomic plant. request for an eighth document on
In their request, the lobbyists said the grounds it contained privileged
the documents could contain infor- attorney-client communication.
mation showing that repair costs at The commission also stood behind
Palisades surpassed the amount of its May 1 decision ordering Detroit
the 1977 settlement. They said Con- Edison Co. to turn over to the same
sumers would, in essence, be two lobbying groups the results of a
passing the excess costs on to its 1977-78employee attitude survey.
customers.

S AT BR IARWOOD Kissinger gives onditional
769-8780 {Adjacent to J C Penney)gives
SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30 to SALT H treaty
Cun. , H nls 12 nem til 1:30PM.

...the 1015
fastest fun215:5
in the west! la~ IA

WASHINGTON (AP) - Former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
yesterday said ratification of the SALT
II treaty must be coupled with sharply
increased defense spending to correct a
military balance he said is beginning to
"tilt ominously" against the United
States.
Kissinger also linked his endor-
sement of the pact on a declaration
by the Senate calling the Soviets to task
for political adventurism around the
world.
INTESTIMONY before the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee, he said
the pact is flawed with ambiguities
which must be corrected.
"Rarely in history has a nation so
passively accepted so radical a change
in the military balance," Kissinger
said.
He said the balance has deteriorated
over the past 15 years and blamed it on
taken strategic doctrines, on domestic
turmoil caused by the Vietnam War and
on "choices of the present ad-
ministration."
KISSINGER SAID he himself, must
accept some of the blame.
But he was especially critical of the
Carter administration for stopping
deployment of the B-1 bomber and the
neutron warhead, shutting -down the
Minuteman missile assembly line, and
slowing other strategic programs.
"After much reflection, I have con-
cluded I can support ratification only
with three conditions," Kissinger told
the committee.
"First, if it is coupled with a defense
program representing an obligatory
understanding between the Congress
and the president which overcomes on
an urgent basis the grave peril caused-
by the current military balance.
"SECOND, IF it is accompanied by
amendments - not requiring re-
negotiation - clearing up ambiguities
in the treaty, defining the status of the
protocol, the meaning of non-

"And third, if it is accompanied by a
vigorous expression of the Senate's
view of the linkage between SALT and
Soviet geopolitical conduct."
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
called Kissinger's proposals
"positive," noted Kissinger is "against
any amendments which would kill the
treaty" and predicted it would be
ratified.
STATE DEPARTMENT spokesman
Hodding Carter said: "Although we
disagree with some of the points made
in Dr. Kissinger's analysis, we
welcome his general approach to the
SALT II agreement and his opposition
to its renegotiation or rejection." One
point of disagreement with Kissinger
was on his endorsement of a link bet-
ween SALT and Soviet behavior
elsewhere in the world.
Kissinger urged delaying ratification
until the next Congress if it takes that
long to put a commitment to a stepped-
up defense program into high gear.
But Sen. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.), told
Kissinger: "I don't believe it would
serve our interests to lay this over while
we fight over a suitable arms
program."
UNDER QUESTIONING by Javits
and Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.),
Kissinger said that if his only choice
was to vote up or down on the treaty
without any force modernization
program he would vote no. Sen. George
McGovern (D-S.D.), told Kissinger his
proposals set too higha price for SALT.
"You offer not a formula for arms
reduction but arms escalation,"
McGovern said.
"I am not asking a price for SALT,"
Kissinger replied. "I am trying to in-
dicate a serious problem that has
developed over a long period of time,
and that has to be remedied with or
without SALT." He said the United
States should seek substantial arms
reductions in SALT III hut said they

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LADIES and GENTLEMEN FRI
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