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July 25, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1979-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 4-Wednesday, July 25 1979-The Michigan Daily
Congestion, peddlers spell trouble

By TIM YAGLE
The crowd of more than a quarter
million people expected to attend the
art fair over the next four days could.
give a policeman nightmares, but Ann
Arbor law enforcement officials say
they'll have the situation under control.
Police officers are predicting that
their biggest headaches this week will
be caused by the congestion created by
illegally parked cars and unauthorized
street vendors, rather than the large
crowds.
City police officers and University
security officials, ready to take care of
any problems that might arise, patrol
the fair areas both on foot and by car. If
severe weather is imminent police cir-
culating on foot with radios can easily
alert people strolling past the exhibits.
If someone suffers a physical injury,
there are enough officers to get to the
scene in a very short time.
"Arrangements are made for an
avenue to be open for an emergency
vehicle to arrive . . . in a very, very
short period of time and for

Police gearfor art fair

professional help to get there," said
University Safety Director Walter
Stevens.
"I FEEL VERY confident that they
(police and emergency personnel) can
do the job," he added.
Officials from both departments say
this is probably the best method to
police the fair. In past years, "we have
not been faced with anything
astronomical as far as problems are
concerned," Stevens commented.
Stevens indicated that the best way
for people to ensure their personal
safety and the security of their valuables
is simple common sense. "The protec-
tion is there, provided they (Art Fair
patrons) take the proper precautions,"
Stevens said. "Don't display a lot of
money and don't lay down your pur-
ses."
ANN ARBOR Police Major Robert
Whittaker said the department will try

to "maintain peace in an area
saturated by a third-of-a-million people
in four days and to keep people from
setting up illegal (vending) booths."
The police will handle the large horde
of fair-goers the same way they handle
the massive football crowds at
Michigan Stadium, said Whittaker,
likening the art fair to "stacking four
football games end to end." But during
the art fair people are constantly
streaming in and out of the area, he
said, whereas on a football Saturday
the pigskin patrons arrive and leave in
a big throng all at once.
Five guards are patrolling the South
University and East University areas
on foot during the afternoon and
evening, he said.
ADDITIONAL GUARDS from the
University's contracted State Security
Service roam through the crowds at
each fair location with a watchful eye.

Sgt. DaveMiller,a veteranof nineart
faira, aaid the police must also deal with
"the kooka who come into town to get an
audience. Its a hassle," he added.
Another major problem the police
confront is people illegally aetting up
bootha to diaplay their "art." Miller
said someone might go to a dime store
and buy something to sell, then set up a
booth to diaplay and hopefully sell his
merchandise.
MILLER SAID the large crowd isn't
as big a problem as most people might
think because the fair promotes festive
atmosphere. "Most people are happy
and jovial," Miller explained.
One of the areas hardest to patrol is
East University because of the large
crowd it attracts, Miller said. "People
get in there so thick," he said. "It's one
solid mass of people."
Police say looters aren't a major
problem. While uniformed officers
patrol the areas by day, most artists
hire people to guard their wares by
night. Others, especially on South
University, place their goods in stores.

5,

I
R
4
'

ART FAIR GUIDE STAFF
Sara Anspach Patricia Hagen
Co-editors
Rosalind Gould
Sales Representative

Lisa Klausner
Photographers
Curt Shoultz
Artist

Jim Kruz

Staff Writers; Marjorie Bohn, John Goyer, Adrienne Lyons, Mark Parrent,
Joshua Peck, Beth Persky, Stephen Pickover, Tim Yogle
Camera Shop, Inc.
ART FAIR SALE
Wed-Thurs-Fri-Sat, July 25, 26, 27, 28
Bargain prices on SAVE on cameras, lenses,
EVERYTHING in our store gadget bags, enlargers, etc.
Xerox color copies IF IT'S IN STOCK, Special store hours
8 x 10 pnIT'S ON SALE Wed-Fri- 9am-9pm
our reg. $1.49 Sat 'til 6pm
now $1.25 Lwhhile-you-wt-service
while-you- 1115 South University
wait-service ,Conero ShopInc, 65-101

20% off all artist materials
and framing supplies.
July 16 thru August 11
MORE THAN A BQOKSTORE
549 E. University at the corner of East U. and South U. 662 -3201

BICYCLE JIM'S
RESTAURANT
& PUB
1301 S. UnIversity
corner of S. Forest

" ..j

I

ARTFANR HOURS:
1010 A M.1.:00 A A
GOOD FOOD AND SPIRITS
yg:VWA T HE

L'

.. .

fik

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